Customer Reviews


332 Reviews
5 star:
 (168)
4 star:
 (102)
3 star:
 (21)
2 star:
 (16)
1 star:
 (25)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An American classic that must be read by all (and never banned)
If there's any book out there that needs no introduction (or review, to be honest), it's Mark Twain's The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Yet here I am reviewing it, anyway. I must admit (not without a fair share of embarrassment) that I just now got around to reading this American classic for the first time. I never had to read it in school, and to some degree I felt...
Published on May 5 2007 by Daniel Jolley

versus
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great story, but...
...the dialect is irritating. On one hand, I can't deny that the dialect adds character to the first-person narrative, and is, in that respect, functional. On the other hand, it's *irritating*! I had to re-read countless sentences because of it. I can only imagine what reading this book must be like for someone who's first language isn't English. The story itself is...
Published on June 21 2004 by Caradae Linore


‹ Previous | 110 11 1234 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

4.0 out of 5 stars Huckleberry Finn, Nov. 10 2002
By 
Jessica (Boise, ID USA) - See all my reviews
I thought that this was an exciting book, and I would recommend it to anyone who likes adventure. Southern dialect is used throughout the entire novel, and it was difficult to understand at first, but once I had read a little ways into it, the language added tremendous reality to the story. This book is about a young boy who runs away from his dad, the town drunk, and is later joined by a slave, Jim, who is running aways at an attempt for freedom. It questions a lot of the values that Americans had when it was written (before the Civil War), and it's message is timeless. It was an awesome book, and you should definitely check it out!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Huckleberry Finn, Nov. 10 2002
By 
Jessica (Boise, ID USA) - See all my reviews
I thought that this was an exciting book, and I would recommend it to anyone who likes adventure. Southern dialect is used throughout the entire novel, and it was difficult to understand at first, but once I had read a little ways into it, the language added tremendous reality to the story. This book is about a young boy who runs away from his dad, the town drunk, and is later joined by a slave, Jim, who is running aways at an attempt for freedom. It questions a lot of the values that Americans had when it was written (before the Civil War), and it's message is timeless. It was an awesome book, and you should definitely check it out!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars An Enjoyable and Educational Read Despite Controversy, Nov. 10 2002
By 
"erinschietinger" (San Francisco, CA United States) - See all my reviews
Despite the fact that The Adventure of Huckleberry Finn has been the subject of conflict and controversy since its publication over a century ago, it has remained a favorite for a wide range of audiences. Between the rollicking humor and a series of outrageously unexpected adventures, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn could be categorized as a Dennis the Menace style epic. Mark Twain uses local dialects and detailed descriptions to recreate each of Huck's extraordinary experiences. However, beneath the quaint language and good humor that characterize small town life in antebellum Mississippi, Mark Twain reveals the horrors of the slave trade. The book has been banned in a number of schools and libraries on account of Twain's straightforward treatment of such a delicate topic. Huck's growth and development throughout the novel lead him to reject the culturally predominant attitude toward slaves and he eventually embraces Jim not only as person but also as a friend. Though the words Twain uses to refer to slaves are offensive, his portrayal of the deepening relationship between Huck and Jim is a harsh critique of the attitudes and practices of the slaveholding class. Whether it is read as a purely entertaining tale of juvenile mischief or a biting criticism of slavery, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn will continue to excite and inspire audiences for decades to come.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Up and Down the Mississippi, Nov. 6 2002
Huckleberry Finn, a boy in the Deep South, is living with the Widow Douglas and is finally becoming civilized, when all of the sudden, Huck's father comes back to town. He decides to take Huck back into the wilderness to live with him. He keeps Huck under lock and key, so Huck decides to escape. Huck plans his own "murder" and takes a raft down to Jackson's Island, where he meets Jim, Miss Watson's slave who ran away. Jim and Huck head up north, where they will both be free. Once there, they begin to get homesick and head back down south. On the way down, they meet two bums who think of themselves as a duke and as a king. The foursome continue down while the bums trick all the towns along the way out of their money. Eventually, being broke, the bums sold Jim without Huck's knowledge. Huck finds out, and goes to find Jim at the Phelps' farm. Sally Phelps mistakes Huck to be her nephew, Tom Sawyer. Tom later arrives and Huck convinces him to help him steal Jim back and to play the part of Sid. The two of them work out a plan to get Jim out and cause one very large headache for Aunt Sally. In the middle of freeing Jim, Aunt Polly comes and Tom gets shot in the leg. At the end, Jim is set free under the orders of his owner in her will, Tom recovers and Aunt Sally threatens to take in Huck and civilize him.
I thought this book was very funny, though a little hard to get into during the first 49 pages, and some parts must be read aloud in order to understand the dialect. I recommend that this be read by everyone ages ten and up.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Huck Finn is the greatest, Oct. 28 2002
As I read Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, I was in love with Mark Twain once again, because this is such a literary wonder. The protagonist, Huck, has to face many issues in his life. He has many adventures and many moral problems to face. He has to go through "Rights of passages" throughout this story, which give children great morals to follow. He is a great role model in my opinion (but not his shenanigans...). Find out about Jim, the black slave, who is caught between the social choice of Huck or Huck's individual decision on setting him free or turning him in. You just have to read this book. Many others have. Will you?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Oct. 17 2002
By A Customer
I would recommend this book to 15 year olds and up or if you have a good vocabulary. This is a spectacular book. This book kept me in suspense almost the whole book. This book teaches you about slavery. They have a lot of people that think African-Americans should be slaves. It is an adventurous book that takes you along the Mississippi & The Ohio River before the civil war. I liked the book, because most the time when I start a book I get bored with it then I don't finish it. I really recommend that teachers have this book for there students and parents have there children read this book, I hope people wont ever be prejudice.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Something to Keep in Mind, Oct. 9 2002
By 
Kat (San Francisco) - See all my reviews
With this novel Mark Twain confidently changed the way Americans read as well as viewed literature. Through the careful construction of the two main characters Huck and Jim, Twain explores the questionable moral values and hypocrisy of society. Against all odds Huck and Jim form an honest relationship that rises above race, slavery, and southern society. Twain's story is told through the voice of boy who has not yet been "sivilized" by society, and is still able to live outside of convention. This novel combines the strong language that Twain has been remembered for, and a message that is as relevant today as it was in the early nineteen hundreds. As a college student who has read this book in middle scool, high school, and college, I can say that The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was written for all ages and is an important and necessary educational tool.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A joy to read and cornerstone of American literature and art, Sept. 11 2002
Mark Twain is rightly regarded as an icon of American literature. Of his works, Huckleberry Finn and Tom Sawyer are the most famous, and of the two Huckleberry Finn is generally held to be the finer. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book as part of my introduction to American literature. Mark Twain had a sharp wit and his stories are rich with character, personalities, language, irreverant humor and situations. The historical aspect of the story is also interesting and important. The story gives a human-level view of Mississippi towards the end of slavery. The N-word is in common usage, but in an everyday context not as a derogatory term. The story shows some interesting and perhaps unexpected relationships and allegences. The wisdom and ignorance of the two main protagonists is a constant source of joy and humor. Highly recommended for adults and teenagers alike.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars It's Mark Twain Say No More!, Aug. 1 2002
This timeless classic by Mark Twain should be a must read for everyone. I am so happy to know that most schools you have to read this for at least one class before you graduate high school...This should be a bedtime story for younger ages above the age of 8 and a book that all adults and children should read over and over again!
As always Mark Twain writes in pen how the people talk and gives you such a mental picture of their surroundings and as you read you can actually feel their emotions in your head,heart,stomach, and soul!
I won't however tell you any of the plot, it is far too interesting and you have to read (see) it for yourself!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, July 27 2002
By 
Caroline (United States) - See all my reviews
I must say, I read Huckleberry Finn the first time when I was too young. However, this summer, it was on my summer reading list, so I started it once again. For the first half, I enjoyed it immensely- it was exciting, well written and interesting. However, this book seems like it goes on forever- and it stays the same, for me, after I'd read the first half, the second half was very similar- and by the end, I was very ready for the book to be finished.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 110 11 1234 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain (Paperback - May 26 1994)
CDN$ 6.00 CDN$ 2.97
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews