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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent characters, engrossing mystery.
Familiar with his stories for years, I finally decided to buckle down and read one of Arthur Conan Doyle's stories of Sherlock Holmes, and "The Hound of the Baskervilles," the most famous of the novels, was the one I decided to pick up. To my surprise, I tore through it. It was a simple read, yet a complicated and satisfying mystery.
As with all the Holmes stories,...
Published on Jan. 15 2003 by Benjamin

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3.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as Holmes' short stories.
A mysterious hound is haunting a family estate, and the new heir has employed Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson to investigate the hound, find out the death of his relative, and save the heir's life. Throughout the book, the neighbors, the townspeople, an escaped convict and are all suspects.
While not a large book, the Hound of the Baskervilles does trudge along at...
Published on June 24 2003 by sporkdude


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4.0 out of 5 stars A Great Sherlock Holmes Novel, Dec 3 2003
By 
Jim Lyons (Gibsonia, PA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Hound of the Baskervilles (Paperback)
The novel I read is called "The Hound of the Baskervilles" by Arthur Conan Doyle. I liked this book because of the characters, how the story developed, and how it was written.
The main characters in the book are Sherlock Holmes and Watson. Together they solve the mystery of who killed Sir Charles Baskerville. I think they make a good team because Sherlock does more of the thinking about evidence and theories and Watson goes out and does the leg work of asking questions and gathering information. Even though Sherlock knows the answer to the mystery, he wouldn't be able to do it without Watson and he doesn't act like the superior of the two.
I also liked the book because it was a mystery so the more I read, the more exciting it got as the killer's identity was revealed. I did not know who the killer was or what his motive was until the end.
Finally, I liked the way the author wrote. When Sir Henry was being chased by the hound, I almost felt like it was after me. He had the characters say things like "By Jove" and "Good Heavens". Also, instead of writing "he said" all the time, it was sometimes written as "said he". Lastly, words would be repeated which I thought made it funny such as: "The brute, the brute", "His wife, His wife", and "A beard, a beard".
In conclusion, I enjoyed this book and agree with those who say that this is one of the best detective stories ever written.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as Holmes' short stories., June 24 2003
By 
sporkdude "sporkdude" (San Jose, Ca United States) - See all my reviews
A mysterious hound is haunting a family estate, and the new heir has employed Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson to investigate the hound, find out the death of his relative, and save the heir's life. Throughout the book, the neighbors, the townspeople, an escaped convict and are all suspects.
While not a large book, the Hound of the Baskervilles does trudge along at some points. The someone antiquated language aside, it does delve into more detail and much more build up than a typical Holmes' short story does. So while in a short story, the mystery would be solved in minutes, in this book, the mystery takes a while to come forth. For example, in the beginning there is a mysterious person in a stagecoach following the heir. The mystery is only solved at the end, but with all the other events that took place, the reader has already lost interest in that particular person. I personally forgot about it, thus it did not intrigue me at all.
Also, in much of this book, Holmes is not even present. The wit and mystery are substituted with settings and descriptions instead, not Doyle's strongest points.
While a classic mystery which is still good, it can come out as somewhat unsatisfying.
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3.0 out of 5 stars The Worst Sherlock Holmes's Novel Ever., April 10 2003
By 
Khalifa Alhazaa "a_mathematician" (Doha, Qatar) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Hound of the Baskervilles (Paperback)
I read this novel after an almost chronological reading in the Sherlock Holmes's novels and short stories.
I certainly started with "a study in scarlet" which was fine, then went to "the sign of four" which was even finer. These two novels where enough to get me hooked on the world of Doyle's Holmes. Then to make things even better, I read the "adventures of Sherlock Holmes," a collection of short stories, which were excellent, followed by "the memoir of Sherlock Holmes" which was on the same lines as the adventures, but Sherlock Holmes was finally killed by Moriarty in the last short story of the collection. I was not afraid, because the remaining pages of the collection of stories I had was still thick, so I knew something was going to happen. Sure enough, Sherlock Holmes was resurrected in the next collection (not before "the hound of Baskervilles", although it is traditionally given before it in the complete works) which was called "the return of Sherlock Holmes." Up to this point I was a big fan of Holmes, but this story: "the hound of Baskervilles," came to destroy everything.
The first aspect I hated about it, was that it wasn't a mystery. It was a quest behind the villain, who was knowen by the middle of the story ... and no wonder, for Doyle wrote this after the acclaimed death of Holmes. He was not ready yet to bring back his detective, and he was actually going to write this story with different characters, until he was struck by Holmes as an already existing character of his, and that he needn't waste his time creating some new character line.
The story is not totally bad, but the idea of having Holmes in a non mystery novel did not strike me as plausible.
I recommend you to read it. It seems, from the review, that I was the only one not to like it, but I can't control that. What I do not like is what I do not like, and I hope you found something useful in this review.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent characters, engrossing mystery., Jan. 15 2003
By 
Benjamin (ATLANTA, United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Hound of the Baskervilles (Paperback)
Familiar with his stories for years, I finally decided to buckle down and read one of Arthur Conan Doyle's stories of Sherlock Holmes, and "The Hound of the Baskervilles," the most famous of the novels, was the one I decided to pick up. To my surprise, I tore through it. It was a simple read, yet a complicated and satisfying mystery.
As with all the Holmes stories, his assistant Dr. Watson is charged with telling the tale of the bloody Baskerville curse. Sir Charles Baskerville, who was the charge of the family estate, has recently been gored to death by some sort of animal, and Sir Henry, the new heir to the household and the family fortune, fears that the mythic curse of a hellhound stalking the family grounds is true.
A strange twist occurs in this investigation, though, for it's not Holmes who goes to investigate the house. It's Watson, who studies the suspicious neighbors and staff, keeps close watch over Sir Henry and begins to notice that some very odd things are lurking about the moor.
Is the curse behind this killing, or is it a villain of flesh and blood?
The lead characters are defined well, and, though this is my first Holmes story, I understood the basics and the rhythm almost immediately. The narrative structure that Doyle is famous for is, as expected, charming, and the characters are well-defined. The mystery is properly twisted, and I didn't really guess the middle or the ending.
The best twist, to me, wasn't the reveal of any villain or method. It was the twist involving the shadowy figure on the moor. I didn't see it coming at all, and, when I read it, I realized that this old novel still had the narrative tools to surprise me.
It's a classic for a reason.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Men of science investigate the supernatural, Nov. 21 2002
By 
This review is from: The Hound of the Baskervilles (Paperback)
"The Hound of the Baskervilles" is among the most famous of the Sherlock Holmes stories overall, and certainly the most famous of the four Holmes novels. Perhaps this is because of its ingenious plot premise. In this story, the famous deductive detective and his friend Dr. Watson are called upon to investigate at Baskerville Hall, a remote country mansion where the new heir to the property fears for his life. Apparently an old family legend has come true, and a horrible hound who haunts the moors is thought responsible for the deaths of the previous landowners. I know of no more chillingly atmospheric and mysterious setups for a mystery than this one. Unfortunately, large portions of the book feature yawning gaps in which Holmes himself does not appear, and we are forced to subsist on less interesting characters. Still, it *is* a Holmes story (fans of Holmes were delighted when this novel first appeared, since it was the first new Holmes story in some years, the author having previously killed off his famous hero in "The Final Problem") and the mystery is a good one, featuring red herrings, suspicious goings-on, and clever sleuthing by the great detective. The climax of the tale, when it finally comes, is as exciting as any Conan Doyle ever wrote. A must for mystery fans.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Still Magnificant! The Mystery Novel that Started it All, July 19 2002
By 
Oddsfish (United States) - See all my reviews
I just read Laurie King's wonderful "The Beekeeper's Apprentice" in which she writes her take on Sherlock Holmes. That just wasn't enough Holmes for me, though; so I picked up Doyle's only Sherlock Holmes novel to read. I had somehow missed it, though I've read so many of the original tales. I expected this to be good and it was.
In "The Hound of the Baskervilles," Holmes and Watson are confronted with an interesting case. On the moors of Wales, the Baskerville family has long told of a legendary hound who's purpose is to plague the family. It has always been considered only a legend, but then Charles Baskerville is killed, and it could be by that hound. It seems someone wants to be rid of the Baskervilles, and the heir of Charles Baskerville is in danger on the moors. Watson and Holmes, of course set out to solve the mystery.
The novel is a success. It is short with easily flowing prose. The case is classic Holmes; it's always intriguing. The atmosphere of the moor Doyle creates is compelling. The novel remains fairly intense until the climactic end. There's not much bad to say about it, except maybe a little more Holmes and a little less Watson would have been nicer. But overall, this is a fun and worthy read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Sleuth of Secrecy and Sensationalism, June 6 2001
By 
George R Dekle "Bob Dekle" (Lake City, FL United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Hound of the Baskervilles (Paperback)
"The Hound of the Baskervilles" ranks as the most famous and also the best of the four Sherlock Holmes novels. It is the first Holmes novel I read as a child, and the combination of ancient curse, foreboding moor, and modern danger kept me turning the pages.
"The Hound" is unique among the Holmes novels because for a large part of the mystery, Holmes' character is offstage, appearing only at the last moment to bring events to a hair-raising denouement.
Holmes is a brilliant but eccentric detective. Sometimes his personality quirks lead him into danger. Holmes is both tenacious and audacious, and the interplay of those two qualities almost bring him to grief. He loves to hold his cards close to his vest, and sometimes excludes others from information vital to their safety. He also loves to engineer dramatic climaxes to highlight his deductive powers. Holmes' joint penchants for secrecy and sensation almost gets his client killed, but all's well that ends well.
The Dover Thrift Edition offers quality entertainment at a rock bottom price. Inexpensive, but definitely not cheap.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Classic book, can't beat the price!, Sept. 20 2000
By 
John DiBello (Brooklyn, NY) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Hound of the Baskervilles (Paperback)
[This is a review of the Dover thrift Edition of 'The Hound of the Baskervilles'] Dover Thrift Editions have done a lot to get me to read great literature: classic lit at an *incredibly* affordable price (at the time I'm writing this review the book retails for a *buck fifty*...even if it goes up, that's still one of the best book values you'll ever find!).
Dover's no-frills approach (generic jackets, inexpensive paper) belies the classic range of their thrift editions, and this is one of my favorites: Conan Doyle's best-known Sherlock Holmes adventure, genuinely chilling and moody. If you haven't read it in a long while, you might have forgotten how well-drawn and detailed this is. Conan Doyle's characters, dialogue, cliffhangers (Chapter Two's end is, in my opinion, one of English lit's best example of suspenseful cliffhangers that will have you flipping the page), setting and the suspenseful climax have made this a mystery classic for over a hundred years. If you're familiar only with Nigel Bruce's humorous but bumbling portrayal of Doctor Watson, you'll enjoy the *true* Watson of the novel...intelligent man of action, trusted by Holmes to investigate the scene ahead of him.
The price makes this an excellent gift (aw, at this price, go ahead and pick them up a few more Dover Thrift editions, including 'Six Great Sherlock Holmes Stories') or a great book to take on a trip (at this price, you can afford to give it away to a fellow traveler when you've finished).
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of the best mysteries ever!, March 7 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Hound of the Baskervilles (Paperback)
The Hound of the Baskervilles was an excellent book, and one of the best mysteries I have ever read. Holmes, the superhuman detective, is asked to investigate the death of Charles Baskerville, which many believe to be the work of the ferocious hound, a curse brought about by the misdeeds of Hugo Baskerville. When Sir Henry inherits the estate, Holmes must solve the mystery before another Baskerville meets his end!
This novel has one of the most complex plots of any mystery, with many unexpected twists, and is one that will keep you reading until its suspenseful, engrossing climax. The setting is also well put together, and the danger of the foggy moor only adds to the drama.
This story had huge appeal for me, largely because of the believability of the characters. Holmes, Watson, and Henry are very realistic - and people that I would want to know. Holmes was so real to many readers, that they actually wrote to 221 Baker Street, his fictional address!
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle was not only a great mystery writer, but a wonderful novelist as well. This novel is proof that he really deserved the title of knight!
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4.0 out of 5 stars NOT the best about sherlock holmes, but good!, Jan. 4 2002
i've read a fair chunk of sherlock holmes's adventures, and i must say, doyle is at his best when he's writing short stories. although this book has it's merits (it's still classic doyle about classic sherlock holmes) it's too long and doesn't pack the punch of his shorter works.
to whom i would recommend this book: to real sherlock holmes enthusiasts, who have read pretty much everything else by doyle about him and want to finish up the last few still-nutritious table scraps.
to whom i would recommend avoiding this book: pretty much everybody else, but especially those who are new to sherlock holmes. you'd be much better off reading "the adventures of sherlock holmes," "the memoirs of sherlock holmes" (though the ending of was weak weak weak!) or "the return of sherlock holmes."
happy reading, and if you happen to stumble upon this book before reading any of the others, don't worry, it's still pretty good!
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The Hound of the Baskervilles
The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Paperback - Oct. 21 1994)
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