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5.0 out of 5 stars Timber Wolfs...Ya!!!
I recommend this product to all Cub Scout and TimberWolf Scout Leaders! It is the original version by Baden-Powell's good friend Rudyard Kipling. Delivery was very prompt. The book is good quality.
Published 5 months ago by Mary R. Fisher

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3.0 out of 5 stars Try it!
It depicted the culture and feelings of different animals standing on their sides. Also, it provides the view from them to forest and to human. It contains exciting stories of Mowgli growing up. A very good book for education.
Published on July 19 2000


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5.0 out of 5 stars Timber Wolfs...Ya!!!, Jan. 26 2014
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This review is from: The Jungle Book (Paperback)
I recommend this product to all Cub Scout and TimberWolf Scout Leaders! It is the original version by Baden-Powell's good friend Rudyard Kipling. Delivery was very prompt. The book is good quality.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book, Aug. 22 2012
By 
Angela Sheppard (alberta, canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Jungle Book (Paperback)
My 8 year old son really enjoyed reading this book. He keeps talking about Mowgli and wishes the story was longer. Great book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Kipling's Fables, Aug. 22 2011
By 
Dave_42 "Dave_42" (Australia) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Jungle Book (Paperback)
"The Jungle Book" is a collection of stories (or fables) and songs/poems by Rudyard Kipling, and was originally published in 1894. The book consists of 7 short stories, separated by seven poems. The first three stories involve Mowgli, but the other four stories are not part of that series, nor do they all take place in the same jungle or any jungle at all. What these stories do have in common is the anthropomorphizing of animals as characters in these stories. As with all fables, these stories impart a moral message to the reader.

"Mowgli's Brothers" is the first story in the book and was originally published in January of 1894 in "St. Nicholas Magazine". The story is about Mowgli being adopted by the wolf family which then raises him. With Shere Khan hunting in their area of the jungle, the Father Wolf (Akela) and the mother (Raksha) find and take in a human baby. At the wolf council, Baloo speaks for the cub, and Bagheera buys his life with a fresh kill. As time passes, Shere Khan turns most of the wolves against Mowgli, and they plot to overthrow Akela as the leader. Mowgli is then sent away from the wolves, vowing to return with Shere Khan's hide. This story is followed by the "Hunting-Song of the Seeonee Pack".

"Kaa's Hunting" is a short study from March-April of 1894. It takes place sometime during the period covered in "Mowgli's Brothers", though it isn't mentioned in that story. It is a story about Mowgli's abduction by monkees, a.k.a the Bandar-log. Baloo and Bagheera, rescue Mowgli with the aid of Kaa. This story is followed by the "Road Song of the Bandar-Log".

"Tiger! Tiger!" was a short story published in February of 1894 in magazines before being published in this collection. This covers the confrontation between Mowgli and Shere Khan. Mowgli has been kicked out of the jungle and has been adopted by a couple who believe he is Nathoo, the child that they lost. Mowgli tries to fit in, but he alienates himself from the others because he doesn't accept their misconceptions about the jungle. Shere Khan returns and is plotting to kill Mowgli, but he is warned by one of his wolf friends (Grey Brother) whom he goes to visit regularly. Mowgli comes up with a plan to kill Shere Khan, but when successful he gets into an argument with Buldeo, the hunger. Buldeo tries to take Shere Khan's skin, but Mowgli refuses to give it to him, so Buldeo turns the entire village against him and Mowgli finds himself an outcast of both the jungle and the village. This story is followed by "Mowgli's Song".

"The White Seal" is a short story published in August of 1893. The story is about Kotick, a rare white-furred seal who spends his life searching for a home where seals will not be hunted by humans. He is isolated from the other seals by his goal, but he finally discovers a place that the Sea Cows know which is free from man. This story is followed by "Lukannon".

"Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" is a story from November of 1893. In this story an English family save a young mongoose (Rikki Tikki) who becomes their pet. Rikki Tikki first saves the families young boy Teddy from a dust brown snakeling. Rikki Tikki takes to patrolling the house while the family sleeps, and it is during this that he is warned by Chuchundra that there are two cobras (Nag and Nagaina) that are planning to kill the family. Rikki Tikki first takes on Nag, waking the father who kills Nag. Nagaina then swears vengeance, but Rikki Tikki gets help from Darzee (a tailor bird) and locates Nagainaj's nest and then uses the eggs to distract Nagaina to save Teddy again. This story is followed by "Darzee's Chant".

"Toomai of the Elephants" is a short story from the December of 1893. In this story little Toomai is told that he cannot be an elephant handler unless he sees the dance of the elephants. When the great elephant Kala Nag hears the call of the elephant from far off in the jungle, he goes to find the elephants, taking little Toomai with him. This story is followed y "Shiv and the Grasshopper".

"Her Majesty's Servants" was originally published in March of 1894. This story is about the various animals used to support Her Majesty's armed forces in India. The animals discuss their roles in the army, each taking pride in the function they perform. This is followed by "Parade-Song of the Camp Animals" which closes out the book.

This is a good collection of short stories, though there is a definite variability in the quality, and of course they don't all take place in the jungle. Rudyard Kipling wrote poems, short stories, and novels. Having lived in India, England, and the United States, and also spent a fair amount of time in South Africa. He drew on the rich cultural history that he enjoyed to create some wonderful tales. He remains one of the best known writers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. "The Jungle Book" is one of his best known works, though most know it through films which do not accurately represent the stories within. It blends his short fiction with some of his poems, but I find it a bit too uneven to give it five-stars.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Classics then and now, Oct. 3 2007
By 
V. G. Gaudio "bibliophile" (Montreal, QC Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Jungle Book (Paperback)
Not being able to recall a time when the Jungle Book tale was not apart of my life, it was a shock when I realized in my third decade that Kiplings words had yet to be read by my eyes anyways.

The surprise was that, unlike Treasure Island, Kipling's book doesn't spark the adventure in the later years. Though perfect for storytelling time before bed or in class, as an adult the narration was too repetitive to be engaging. The story, of course, is an imaginations feild day and that is what makes this story survive after all this time.

Word of Caution: it reads biblically (thou, art, etc.) So in class, you may wish to preempt your lesson with some explanation. A great way though of introducing old english I thought - just enough for them to become familar with the vocab but not so much where they can not follow the story.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Kipling's original masterpiece, June 19 2004
By 
I've been looking for the "Jungle Book" book since I watched both Disney films. Both are wonderful but I do understand what reviewer rockdoc28 meant by there being a watering down of Rudyard Kipling's work.
However, has anyone watched a Chuck Jones' cartoon?
Known as Charles Jones during the earlier cartoon age with Merry Melodies and Loony Tunes, when Jones took over directing the Tom & Jerry cartoons during the 60's, he took a well-gifted hand at directing animated films based on Kipling's stories. Namely "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" and even "The White Seal"(the latter I didn't know was within "The Jungle Book"). Chuck Jones really did these stories more justice than even Disney and he should have been given the right to redo the entire collection but, I digress... However, to rockdoc28,- and others- I found the comparison/contrast of original and adaptation helpful! So thanks! Also, to Jorge Frid and rockdoc28, the particualr edition I own I found when I attended Downtown Miami's annual Book Fair International.
It's called the Illustrated Junior Library by Grosset & Dunlap Publishers (c) 1950.
It is Kipling's original voice and style and it's simply magnificent.
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5.0 out of 5 stars WELL BEYOND DISNEY, Nov. 16 2003
By A Customer
The Jungle Book
When we say "The Jungle Book" most of us invariably think of Disney's films, both animated and live action, that have become the norm for Rudyard Kipling's immortal children's stories. While the Disney interpretation is fun and enchanting, it makes a dramatic departure from the actual stories and takes considerable creative license in telling just a part of the Kipling stories. Even what we get from Disney falls considerably short of the applicable parts of Kipling's original that Disney used. What? Kaa, the snake, as Mowgli's friend and powerful ally? What? A deeper story of Mowgli's experience as a wolf and his relationships with Mother wolf and Father wolf? Oh yes, much, much more.
Kipling's original masterpiece also includes several other wonderful chapters about the continuing adventures of Mowgli and also adds the marvelous tale of "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi," the heroic mongoose whose battles with wicked cobras in an Indian garden easily matches Mowgli's showdowns with Shere Khan.
The book also includes the tale of "The White Seal." This short chapter of "The Jungle Book(s)" provides a wonderful commentary, in the form of animal parable, on human society, competition, male ego and human pride. Our hero, Kotick, the white seal, through his fearless explorations and his willingness to fight for a dream, changes the minds of his parents, his peers and his society for the better. The invitation to each of us is very clear to find and free the white seal that exists in all of us.
Don't get balled up in the notion that "The Jungle Book" is just for kids. A look beneath Kipling's wonderful prose reveals, like most great children's classics, that the author is using the unintimidating forum of children's literature to speak to kids of all ages with the hope that somehow we'll all finally get it.
Buy the book, read it, read it to the kids you know and learn the lesson.
Douglas McAllister
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5.0 out of 5 stars A book of wonder, March 24 2003
By 
Jon Bowling (Indianapolis, IN USA) - See all my reviews
This was probably one of my most favorite books as a young child if not my favorite. The way Kipling shows the struggle of this young boy in the jungle is amazing. He fails to leave out any detail and throughout the whole story your totally caught up in it without one point of boredom. I recommend this to any parent looking for a good book to read to their children or to have their kids read. Kipling is a great author and after doing a report on him and reading some of his other works I recommend those as well, especially A White Man's Burden. If your looking for books by a author who mixes fiction with truth, action and adventure with tales that bring in more serious aspects Kipling is the author for you.
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5.0 out of 5 stars All time favorite, Feb. 25 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: The Jungle Book (Hardcover)
The Jungle Book is now one of my all time favorite books. When you read the book it makes you feel like you're there too. I like the way Rudyard Kipling has the animals talk. The main character in the story is a boy named Mowgli. Mowgli was abandoned by his mother and father and raised by wolves. I think
Mowgli is the perfect character for the story because he is brave, smart, and kind.The part I disliked the most in the story is when they keep going to the council rock. I thought it was boring. I liked the excitement in the book and the cliff hangers. Once I picked up the book I couldn't set it down again. I definitely recommend this book to anybody who is in for a challenge!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Classic, Oct. 24 2002
Kipling's Jungle Book is one of the great classics of children's literature. The central story, that of Mowgli, is an engaging adventure with a much deeper theme of alienation, abandonment and the struggle to find a place for oneself in the world. This partially reflects Kipling's own conflict as a Briton who was both extremely racist and imperialistic yet tied very much to India. Mowgli's story also reflects Kipling's views of race through the racialization of the animal characters. Parents should be warned that in other parts of the book, Kipling's very outdated view of race is much more overt.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not as marred in adaptation as others, Oct. 22 2002
By 
Glen Engel Cox (Columbus, Ohio) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Jungle Book (Hardcover)
While I admire Disney's animation (and am looking forward to their Hamlet-ish The Lion King), I usually gripe about the changes they make in their movies from their source material. All one has to do is read the original Pinocchio, Peter Pan, or, supposedly, Bambi, to berate them for destroying classics. I probably should be bothered as well by their Jungle Book, except that I think that it was one of the cases where the marriage of animation, story and music achieves more than the original. Without the source material, it would be nothing, of course, but the wonderful songs (who can forget "Bare Necessities," "Trust in Me," or "I Wanna Be Like You"?) and the structure that turned Kipling's short tales into a two-hour movie create a gestalt that I'm not sure Kipling's tales do by themselves. This is probably sacrilege to the ears of the true Kipling fan, but I'm nothing if not opinionated.
The stories that make up the Jungle Book aren't solely about Mowgli, though, and it's the others, especially "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi," that make this a definate must have.
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The Jungle Book
The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling (Paperback - March 24 2000)
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