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5.0 out of 5 stars Kipling's original masterpiece
I've been looking for the "Jungle Book" book since I watched both Disney films. Both are wonderful but I do understand what reviewer rockdoc28 meant by there being a watering down of Rudyard Kipling's work.
However, has anyone watched a Chuck Jones' cartoon?
Known as Charles Jones during the earlier cartoon age with Merry Melodies and Loony Tunes, when Jones...
Published on June 19 2004 by Ck

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars A disgusting book
I was very disappointed when I read "The Jungle Book." I had heard wonderful things about it, and I was looking forward to reading a good book. It was NOT a good book, to say the least! Rudyard Kipling is horribly sexist and racist. His writing is terrible. (Have you ever tried to read cardboard? That's what his writing is like, only about a hundred...
Published on April 6 1999


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5.0 out of 5 stars Kipling's original masterpiece, June 19 2004
By 
I've been looking for the "Jungle Book" book since I watched both Disney films. Both are wonderful but I do understand what reviewer rockdoc28 meant by there being a watering down of Rudyard Kipling's work.
However, has anyone watched a Chuck Jones' cartoon?
Known as Charles Jones during the earlier cartoon age with Merry Melodies and Loony Tunes, when Jones took over directing the Tom & Jerry cartoons during the 60's, he took a well-gifted hand at directing animated films based on Kipling's stories. Namely "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi" and even "The White Seal"(the latter I didn't know was within "The Jungle Book"). Chuck Jones really did these stories more justice than even Disney and he should have been given the right to redo the entire collection but, I digress... However, to rockdoc28,- and others- I found the comparison/contrast of original and adaptation helpful! So thanks! Also, to Jorge Frid and rockdoc28, the particualr edition I own I found when I attended Downtown Miami's annual Book Fair International.
It's called the Illustrated Junior Library by Grosset & Dunlap Publishers (c) 1950.
It is Kipling's original voice and style and it's simply magnificent.
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5.0 out of 5 stars WELL BEYOND DISNEY, Nov. 16 2003
By A Customer
The Jungle Book
When we say "The Jungle Book" most of us invariably think of Disney's films, both animated and live action, that have become the norm for Rudyard Kipling's immortal children's stories. While the Disney interpretation is fun and enchanting, it makes a dramatic departure from the actual stories and takes considerable creative license in telling just a part of the Kipling stories. Even what we get from Disney falls considerably short of the applicable parts of Kipling's original that Disney used. What? Kaa, the snake, as Mowgli's friend and powerful ally? What? A deeper story of Mowgli's experience as a wolf and his relationships with Mother wolf and Father wolf? Oh yes, much, much more.
Kipling's original masterpiece also includes several other wonderful chapters about the continuing adventures of Mowgli and also adds the marvelous tale of "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi," the heroic mongoose whose battles with wicked cobras in an Indian garden easily matches Mowgli's showdowns with Shere Khan.
The book also includes the tale of "The White Seal." This short chapter of "The Jungle Book(s)" provides a wonderful commentary, in the form of animal parable, on human society, competition, male ego and human pride. Our hero, Kotick, the white seal, through his fearless explorations and his willingness to fight for a dream, changes the minds of his parents, his peers and his society for the better. The invitation to each of us is very clear to find and free the white seal that exists in all of us.
Don't get balled up in the notion that "The Jungle Book" is just for kids. A look beneath Kipling's wonderful prose reveals, like most great children's classics, that the author is using the unintimidating forum of children's literature to speak to kids of all ages with the hope that somehow we'll all finally get it.
Buy the book, read it, read it to the kids you know and learn the lesson.
Douglas McAllister
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not as marred in adaptation as others, Oct. 22 2002
By 
Glen Engel Cox (Columbus, Ohio) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Jungle Book (Hardcover)
While I admire Disney's animation (and am looking forward to their Hamlet-ish The Lion King), I usually gripe about the changes they make in their movies from their source material. All one has to do is read the original Pinocchio, Peter Pan, or, supposedly, Bambi, to berate them for destroying classics. I probably should be bothered as well by their Jungle Book, except that I think that it was one of the cases where the marriage of animation, story and music achieves more than the original. Without the source material, it would be nothing, of course, but the wonderful songs (who can forget "Bare Necessities," "Trust in Me," or "I Wanna Be Like You"?) and the structure that turned Kipling's short tales into a two-hour movie create a gestalt that I'm not sure Kipling's tales do by themselves. This is probably sacrilege to the ears of the true Kipling fan, but I'm nothing if not opinionated.
The stories that make up the Jungle Book aren't solely about Mowgli, though, and it's the others, especially "Rikki-Tikki-Tavi," that make this a definate must have.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Jungle book showed be sooo much, Jan. 4 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Jungle Book (Hardcover)
There were some things I didn't like in the Jungle Book and that was that some people discrimanted at Mowgli because he was a human and not an animal. For example, the big elephants always didn't like Mowgli because he was a human but the little elephant always stayed his friend no matter what. I like the part that the little elephant was his friend but what about the others. His friends see whats on the inside and not what's on the outside.
Also we see how the bad guy wants to get the good guy. But it's not only in Jungle Book it's always. This book shows the ignorance of people towards animals. We see how different things show new things in life. For example, you can't be plain and boring all the time, you have to try new things in life to explore. But it's not only about life but also other things.
It's sad to notice that sometimes in life, people take advantage of you and in the Jungle Book that is clearly stated. You can see the love between animals and humans and that is what I think is the most important part of the book. The monkeys say thier Mowgli's friend but they aren't there when he needs them only the bear, Baloo is. And I think kids should be read this book becuase, It shows that if you try anything can be overcame. I loved this book, it was one of the most exciting and interesting books I have read in a while.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Jungle Book was great, Jan. 4 2002
This review is from: The Jungle Book (Hardcover)
The Jungle Book was a wonderful novel. It is about an Indian infant called Mowgli who is lost in the jungle, but then was placed in a wolf family. He grows up in the jungle therefore having no manners or any sense of human life. The Jungle Book show how friends can always be mad but then they come around. And they will always be there for you no matter what, if not then they aren't true friends. There is great ambition in Mowgli.
His story is great for all ages. A lot of the characters are explained in detail and you grow to actually love the animals. I think all kids should have read the book rather than see the movie becuase the book is much better.
Some of the values showed in this book are loyalty, trust honor, and courage. This book is valued by many children and it should be read to them as young kids to also expand their imagination. I think that this book was better than a lot of the books that Kipling has written before like "Rikki-tikki-tavi" or "Kim". I guess that I love the whole jungle scene better than any other of his books.
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5.0 out of 5 stars My favorite story: Rikki-Tikki-Tavi! Was perfectly GREAT!!!!, Nov. 27 2001
By 
This review is from: The Jungle Book (Hardcover)
This book was many short stories in it; most of the stories are about Mowgli and a few of them are about other animals and their adventures. My favorite one was Rikki-Tikki-Tavi.
Since this book is mostly about Mowgli, I should say something about it. Mowgli is a boy who was adopted by wolves and grew up to live with them all his life. He can speak their language and they love him. But Mowgli has one enemy, a lame tiger named Shere Kan. The Mother wolf had saved Mowgli from the evil tiger so Shere Kan hates him. Of course, there's a battle at the end. It is a pretty interesting story or, more like, pretty interesting stories.
My favorite story, like I said before, was Rikki-Tikki-Tavi. Rikki, the mongoose who is washed out by a heavy rain and is found by a human boy named Teddy. Rikki is cared for and soon becomes healthy and fit again. One day, Rikki goes out to the large and rather uncultivated garden when he hears two birds chirping sadly. Rikki asks what had happened and one of the birds, named Darzee, tells him that one of their eggs had fallen out and was eaten by the black cobra Nag. At that moment, Nag comes out and tries to kill Rikki by making him pay attention to him while Nag�fs wife, Nagaina, creeps up on Rikki. At the last moment, Rikki notices that Nagaina is behind him and he runs away.
After that incident, Rikki vows to kill the two evil cobras. One day, Rikki overhears Nag and Nagaina discussing on how to kill him. They plan to break into the house, kill the humans with their deadly bite, and then, kill Rikki. Rikki quickly runs back to the house and waits till nightfall. Soon, he hears a drainpipe rattling and sees Nag�fs hooded head creeping towards him with Nagaina right behind him. Rikki hides and waits till Nag comes out. When Nag turns his head towards the beds, Rikki pounces and bites Nag�fs head. Rikki is nearly killed then, but the master of the house, Teddy�fs father, wakes up from all the noise and shoots Nag.
Nagaina, seeing all this, slinks back to her nest. While Rikki regains his strength, he finds out that Nagaina has eggs in her nest and starts searching for her with the aid of Darzee�fs wife. When Rikki finds her, Darzee�fs wife pretends that her wing is broken and hops around Nagaina. Nagaina moves to kill Darzee�fs wife when Rikki runs from behind and takes one of the eggs away. Nagaina turns and tries to strike out at Rikki but Rikki breaks all of the eggs but keeps only one egg unbroken. Rikki threatens Nagaina to get away and Nagaina obeys him. As soon as Nagaina moved away, Rikki breaks the last of the eggs. Rikki and Nagaina battle, both finally falling into Nag and Nagaina�fs hole.
Will Rikki win? Will he survive Nagaina's terrible strenght? If Nagaina wins and is still alive, would she marry again with another black cobra and lay eggs? You'll have to read the book to find out.....
This story was sooo fun and exciting. That is mainly my reason for liking this story better than the others. But I'm not saying that the other stories are not fun. Those other stories were really interesting, especially "The White Seal". This is a book you have to read!
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5.0 out of 5 stars great stories for young and old, Nov. 18 2000
By 
Orrin C. Judd "brothersjudddotcom" (Hanover, NH USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Jungle Book (Hardcover)
Since he wrote these stories during the several years he spent in Brattleboro, VT, we of the North Country have a particular affinity for Rudyard Kipling's Jungle Books. The most familiar are the Mowgli tales, basis for the very good Disney movie. Mowgli is an Indian infant who is lost in the jungle after Shere Khan (the tiger) kills his family. Bagheera (the black panther) places him with a wolf family that has a newborn litter. Mowgli's new "parents" and Bagheera and Baloo (the brown bear) sponsor him for membership in the Wolf Pack and, much to Shere Khan's chagrin, he is admitted. Mowgli is raised according to Jungle Law, but all the while Shere Khan is plotting his revenge and ingratiating himself with the younger wolves. Eventually, he leads a rebellion against Akela, the pack's aging leader and attacks Mowgli, who beats him away with a burning firebrand. In these and the several other Mowgli stories--there are some prequels--Kipling strikes a nice balance between anthropomorphizing the animals and understanding Mowgli's natural superiority.
Also appearing in this collection is a story I've loved since I first saw the Classic Cartoon version--Rikki Tikki Tavi. It tells the story of an intrepid young mongoose and his life or death battle to protect an Indian villa from a couple of particularly unpleasant cobras. Rikki Tikki Tavi has always seemed to me to be one of the great heroes in all of literature.
These are great stories for young and old. For folks who worry about Kipling's potentially imperialist, racist or racialist overtones (see review), rest assured, these tales are free of such themes. They offer an excellent opportunity to introduce kids to the work of a true master storyteller.
GRADE: A
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Jungle Book is a good book with a great reputation., July 2 1999
By 
Bruce Campbell "BruceHawick" (Cleveland, Ohio, USA) - See all my reviews
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I looked foward to reading the Jungle Book, after reading Kim and seeing how well Kipling wrote. And in the Jungle Book I found absolutely nothing, besides what I venture to mention, that slights my opinion of the quality of Rudyard Kipling's writing. I felt that in this book Kiplng was trying to exercise a mode of writing that was supposed to be at an elementary level, and therefor more suitable for children. I claim the same excuse for the length of the book. Yet I feel that Kipling's mode was not the best that could have been chosen. Instead, the book seemed to have a choppy quality, let me explain myself by saying that one chapter was used on a small event in Mowgli's life, and then several years were skipped, so the contents of the next chapter forced you to use an element of brain power for comprehension. I do not know the reader's, nor the general public's, feelings toward this use of brain power, I only know mine, which are that this usage distracts my from the story, and slightly takes me away from the spell any good book ought to have. I do not for one minute say that any of the contents of the book, extracting to the very singular word, were not put down without great thought, creativity, and originality, which all together produce a degree of brilliance. That degree, however, may alter, and I feel that although the brilliance is most definately there, it is not at it's utmost level. I find no fault of that with the author, except that of Kipling's trying to overtake a goal so difficult even he, with all his brilliance, was not able to peform to allow it to be rated as high as five stars. I do, though, sincerely applaud Rudyard Kipling's, original and, absolutely, in every possible way, amazing work, although I feel it to contain too many small faults to call it equal to its extroadinary reputation. I place the fault of it's too high reputaton sincerely upon those who read the book without knowlegde of it beforehand.
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1.0 out of 5 stars A disgusting book, April 6 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Jungle Book (Hardcover)
I was very disappointed when I read "The Jungle Book." I had heard wonderful things about it, and I was looking forward to reading a good book. It was NOT a good book, to say the least! Rudyard Kipling is horribly sexist and racist. His writing is terrible. (Have you ever tried to read cardboard? That's what his writing is like, only about a hundred times worse.) The only reason that Rudyard Kipling's books are called classics today is that they were almost the only children's books in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Children loved them because they were the only books at their reading level that were available. But now that there are millions of children's books on the market, Rudyard Kipling does not deserve any acclaim as an author. His books teach children to be sexist and racist. If libraries are banning "Huckleberry Finn," then they should certainly ban "The Jungle Book."
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4.0 out of 5 stars Classics then and now, Oct. 3 2007
By 
V. G. Gaudio "bibliophile" (Montreal, QC Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Jungle Book (Paperback)
Not being able to recall a time when the Jungle Book tale was not apart of my life, it was a shock when I realized in my third decade that Kiplings words had yet to be read by my eyes anyways.

The surprise was that, unlike Treasure Island, Kipling's book doesn't spark the adventure in the later years. Though perfect for storytelling time before bed or in class, as an adult the narration was too repetitive to be engaging. The story, of course, is an imaginations feild day and that is what makes this story survive after all this time.

Word of Caution: it reads biblically (thou, art, etc.) So in class, you may wish to preempt your lesson with some explanation. A great way though of introducing old english I thought - just enough for them to become familar with the vocab but not so much where they can not follow the story.
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The Jungle Book
The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling (Paperback - March 24 2000)
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