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5.0 out of 5 stars Justina's Review
I think this book is a superior book because it is full of action. This book is about a man named Mr. Phileas Fogg, and his faithful servant, Passepartout, that wager a bet that They can travel the whole world in eighty days stopping at Suez via Mont Cenis and Brindisi, then to Bombay, then Calcutta, Hong Kong, Japan (Yokohama), San Francisco, New York, back to London,...
Published on Nov. 23 2000

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Nice ending, a wonderful book journey
Actually, this book is more of a 3.5 stars for me. I was a little handicapped reading it because I was actually reading the book on my palm (Zire 71), therefore I'm limited with just words. My imagination wasn't aided by visuals from paperback materials. Nevertheless, I enjoyed the journey with Mr. Fogg and Passepartout.
Although there were a lot of boring scenes,...
Published on April 12 2004 by Gerald Sioco


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4.0 out of 5 stars Very Good Even If No Balloon Rides, July 9 2004
By 
Brian P. McDonnell (Holbrook, MA USA) - See all my reviews
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The story is about an eccentric Englishman named Phileas Fogg who makes a twenty thousand pound bet with five of his rich country club friends to travel around the world in eighty days with his trusty servant Passepartout a Frenchman. Along the way they have to overcome many obstacles. Fogg spends most of his fortune overcoming these obstacles and if they don't win the bet he will be ruined. There are some things however that even money can't overcome and several times Fogg is faced with a moral decision that if he pursues the right thing to do will significantly set him back on time.
Their travels take them through England, Paris, the Suez Canal, Egypt, India, Hong Kong, Japan, America, and Ireland. In India they rescue a princess who stays on with them throughout the rest of their journey and a love interest grows between her and Fogg. There is also another subplot involving a bank robbery in England where 55 thousand pounds have been stolen, and Fogg is considered to be the main suspect. A detective Fix is assigned to follow Fogg and to arrest him once he sets foot on English territory.
This book seems to be split into two parts. During the first part of the book when things are going smoothly the servant Passepartout seems to be the main character. At each port Fogg stays in his cabin and just focuses on the next leg of the trip while Passepartout ventures out and gives you a description of the land. It would seem a shame to travel all around the world and not pause to take in any of the sights as Fogg does. I found most of these early chapters pretty mundane and uneventful.
The subplot with Fix at times becomes annoying, and it isn't until they are all working towards the same goal, that this line of the story improves. I also found the exchange rate between dollars and pounds confusing at times. The pound must have been about four or five times greater than the dollar at the time this story was written. Fogg leaves England with around twenty thousand pounds and spends it seems over a hundred thousand dollars on the trip.
Later on as the story progresses and things start to go wrong the focus changes over to Fogg. Passepartout still does some heroic things, but Fogg takes charge and shows some redeeming qualities. The pace of the story quickens and becomes more enjoyable with a few skirmishes taking place in India and America. Fogg seems a different person upon returning to England, and his life is changed forever.
My wife has a framed poster that hangs on one of our walls with a collage of all of the movies that have won the best picture of the year award. "Around The World In Eighty Days" won the award in 1956, and the picture is represented in the collage with the main character Phileas Fogg and his trusty servant Passepartout taking a balloon flight. Based on this picture for years I always assumed the book was about a trip in a balloon around the world. I was surprised then to find out once I finally got a chance to read the actual book that they travel by boat, train, car, sled, and even elephant, but that they never travel by balloon. It turns out that the most memorable scene from the movie was made up by the director and added on to the story. The director seemed to have come to same conclusion that I did, that the written story itself was very good, but I was expecting something a little more.
The book was written in 1873. Jules Verne the author is a Frenchman. In this day and age it was pleasing to see both England and America looked upon in such a favorable light. Englishmen were portrayed as noble and Americans were portrayed as wild and adventurous.
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4.0 out of 5 stars by David Laing, June 28 2004
By A Customer
If you saw the movie that was alledgedly based on the book, and now want to read the book, don't, the movie and book have nearly nothing in common. Phileas Fog is a rich English man who during a card game makes a bet that he could go around the world in 80 days. He buys train ticket, and goes to France where he meets his personal assistant on his journey. Phileas and his French friend begin to journey around the world, but people are after Fog, because they think that he is a thief. Along the way, Fog helps out an Indian princess, who accompanies him the rest of the way, and his assistant gets lost in Japan, and joins a circus troupe accidentally. My only gripe about this book is that the ending is kind of stupid, and you feel that Verne just pulled something out of a hat at the last second for the ending. But, in the end this is a legendary adventure, and you should read it. As you could tell, I couldn't remember the French guy's name, and some other details, because I read this book about a year ago, but you should read it.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Nice ending, a wonderful book journey, April 12 2004
By 
Gerald Sioco "jigsss" (Manila, Philippines) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Actually, this book is more of a 3.5 stars for me. I was a little handicapped reading it because I was actually reading the book on my palm (Zire 71), therefore I'm limited with just words. My imagination wasn't aided by visuals from paperback materials. Nevertheless, I enjoyed the journey with Mr. Fogg and Passepartout.
Although there were a lot of boring scenes, the part where Mr. Fogg rescued Aouda and when Passepartout got lost because of Mr. Fix, these episodes were enough to keep the story moving.
I like that Jules Verne didn't make the book very linear. His way of storytelling does not leave its reader in the dark. Everything has an explanation for what is happening. For me, I believe the ending was the best part in this book. I was almost disappointed because I thought their journey failed but the author just tricked us a little. And although Mr. Fogg did not gain financially with the wager, it was more than material possession that he has gained. And that is a lovely lady whom he shared an exciting adventure.
This book is well-recommended.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Around the World in 80 Days, March 8 2002
By A Customer
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne

The classic Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne, is a story about a wealthy man by the name of Phileas Fogg who bet s half his fortune that he could tour the world in 80 days (it's 1872!). With his servant, Passepartout, Fogg embarks on a journey against time and an adventure he'll never forget, to accomplish some thing never done before.
The characters are very interesting. I liked Passepartout because he kept messing up and doing things wrong. I dislike Fix because he seemed like trying to stall Fogg. The theme is that "Hard work leads to great achievements." What liked most was when Passepartout gets in trouble with three Hindu priests while in India. I didn't really like it when they were in Japan, though. I was satisfied with the ending because Fogg gets a big surprise in the end.
The book can keep you interested for a while. It tells you all you need to know. The vocabulary is difficult though because some of it's French. I dislike how some of it is French. I think the age should be ages 10 and up for some mild language. I recommend this book for people who like adventure. I give this book **** for being a little slow in some areas.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Around The World In Eighty Days by Jules Verne, Dec 10 2001
The book stars out by describing Mr.Fogg. Then Passepartout takes the place as his servent because the other had broughten his shaving water too cold. Fogg decides to travel around the world in 80 days or less after his friends bring up the conversation. He brings his newly hired servant w/him. Before they leave there has been a robbery discovered @ the bank. The first days are smooth riding, then a detective,Fix comes to the conclusion that Fogg is the culprit. He befriends Passepartout to find out info. on Fogg. They encounter many difficulties including broken tracks and herds. They mustcut aross India where they pick up an Indian Lady named Aouda. They also must buy ships too, because they are late. They @ one time purchase an elephant. They get attacked by Siox indians which causes Passepartout to get lost, which slows them down. They rush back to England only to find that they were 5 mins. late or were they? Verne's moral? Love and its' attaintment is more important then all the challenges and money in the world.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Enjoyable but not enthralling, Dec 5 2001
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
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For some reason, I always envisioned a hot air balloon when I thought of Around the World in Eighty Days; in point of fact, a hot air balloon is about the only means of transportation not employed by Phileas Fogg in his circumnavigational sojourn (though it is given a fleeting thought by the hero at one point). Fogg is an interesting character, a man who takes punctuality to an unheard of degree. Basically, his whist partners at the Reform Club tell him there is no way to go around the globe in just 80 days, notwithstanding the fact that a detailed itinerary involving specific boats and trains promises to make it possible. Fogg immediately bets half his fortune that he can do it, setting out on his journey that very night. Passepartout, his newly hired manservant, finds himself dragged along on this historic journey. It so happens that someone matching a description of Fogg has just robbed the Bank of England of 55,000 pounds, and a detective named Fix "discovers" his robber when Fogg arrives in Suez. He wires England with the news and asks for an arrest warrant to be issued; before it arrives, Fogg is off again. Fix finds himself joining in on Fogg's epic journey, waiting for the warrant to reach him on his way, then waiting to arrest Fogg when he steps back on English soil. The travelers face many perils and stumbling blocks along their way, many brought about by Passeportout's naivete and later on by his selfless act of heroism. At every turn, Fogg finds himself in need of alternate transportation methods; he employs, among other vehicles, an elephant, a bridge-jumping train, and a wind-propelled sled. A series of uncommon adventures unfold, involving damsels in distress, Indian attacks, matters of honor, etc. All these events come to a climax the day on which he is due back at the Reform Club.
There is not really much science in this fiction; instead, there is a good bit of geography; the stretches of text explaining the route from one place to another is rather boring to me personally. Luckily, most of the book is full of action. Throughout, the interesting Mr. Fogg remains as calm and placid as a cucumber while Passepartout provides some comic relief by continually finding himself in some sort of trouble. Most of the actors come across as rather wooden and artificial, but the story is good and the ending is quite satisfactory. The reading of this book led me to conjecture that this was one of Verne's earlier works because the characters here are rather drab compared to those in From the Earth to the Moon and because the pages are not weighed down by scientific terminology as in 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea; actually, it is one of his later novels.
Around the World in Eighty Days would well serve the purpose of introducing a Verne newbie to his writing. If you want to see glimpses of Verne's prophetic scientific ideas, though, this is probably not the book for you; it is best suited for recreational reading.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Right Stuff, 19th Century Style, Oct. 28 2001
By 
James Gallen (St. Louis, Missouri, U.S.A.) - See all my reviews
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I decided to read "Around the World in Eighty Days" after encountering an essay about Jules Verne's deep interest and belief in science as an almost God-like vehicle to carry mankind into a brave new world. I then decided to see how this work fit into this theme of Verne's world view. I found a story which, to the reader of Verne's day, may have seemed as inspiring as the tales of astronauts to contemporary readers.
Without giving too much away, "Around the World" is an improbable tale of Phileas Fogg, an English gentleman who carries his regularity to the extreme of eccentricity. After engaging a new servant, the Frenchman, Passepartout, Fogg engages his fellows at the Reform Club in a discussion over the possibility of the completion of an around the world journey. Immediately, Fogg engages in a bet that he can circumnavigate the globe in an eighty day period. Collecting Passepartout, they set off that very night on a journey which will take them, truly, around the world.
Verne's writing was driven, in large degree, by a desire to promote the public acceptance and advancement of science among the French people. In his journey of 1874, Fogg employs many types of conveyance, from the most primitive to the most technologically advanced of the day. Verne uses this novel to contrast the industrial might of the United States with the traditional cultural mores of India.
We can only try to imagine how this novel would have affected the reader of 1874. To a modern reader, the book is a light, fast moving novel with a stimulating thread of suspense and just a touch of romance. What little character development takes place is dwarfed by the demonstration of technological wonder which is depicted throughout the journey. We do, however, come to know a little about the main characters. We see Fogg as an eccentric, phlegmatic Englishman, seemingly single-mindedly devoted to achieving his goal of circumnavigation of the globe within the prescribed period. When Fogg does abandon his single-minded drive it is sidetracked and overwhelmed by his innate senses of honor and duty, almost leading to grave consequences. Passepartout comes across as a fairly simple-minded servant whose sole purpose in life is the faithful service of his master. Add in a beautiful damsel and a determined but feckless detective and we have the makings of a most entertaining read with a most unpredictable hero.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Overated!, Aug. 20 2001
This is certainly not the best of Jules Verne. It is slow, boring, and predictable. (Isn't it obvious that Phileas Fogg is going to get the Aouda in the end?) In fact this book proves that romance is not Jules Verne's strong suit. There are very few exciting moments (though the Indian attack was rather entertaining). And moments that could have been exciting are squandered with a predictable solution and outcome. Then there is the detective, chasing Fogg across the world assuming he is a bounty hunter. To me the detective wasn't ruthless enough, and mostly played by the rules (except for knocking Fogg's assistant out on the boat, which was tense and had a hilarious outcome) of capturing a theif. (waiting for the warrant to reach every British territory and then America for example) As for Phileas Fogg. For a man who has these many adventures Fogg is a very bland persona who isn't very exciting to read about. You'd expect more from someone with a name like Phileas Fogg. In conclusion this is an average book from a very above average writer. Though it has its moments its an unexciting read. Get 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Justina's Review, Nov. 23 2000
By A Customer
I think this book is a superior book because it is full of action. This book is about a man named Mr. Phileas Fogg, and his faithful servant, Passepartout, that wager a bet that They can travel the whole world in eighty days stopping at Suez via Mont Cenis and Brindisi, then to Bombay, then Calcutta, Hong Kong, Japan (Yokohama), San Francisco, New York, back to London, all within eighty days, and by steamboats, and trains. However, a nosy detective, Detective Fix, tracks them down, and tries to arrest Mr. Fogg because he believes that Fogg stole fifty-five thousand pounds. As one may guess, this greatly detains Mr. Fogg, and it seems like he may not make the trip around the world after all. However, the Fix never seems to catch up with Fogg, and Fogg triumphs over most of the obstacles that come his way, like missing boats, missing trains, missing people, and Fogg even meets and rescues a beautiful Indian Princess called Aouda. However, Fix finally catches up to the detective, and everything seems lost for Fogg until Fix discovers that Fogg was not the robber, and Fogg is released. Even so, Fogg is one day late, and in doing so, misses the train that would have taken him to London precisely to win the bet. He ordered a special train, but even in doing so, still misses the bet...or so he thinks. The ending of the book is a very unexpected one. Read this book and find out!
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5.0 out of 5 stars grand adventure, Oct. 1 2000
By 
Orrin C. Judd "brothersjudddotcom" (Hanover, NH USA) - See all my reviews
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It is exceedingly unlikely that the critics will ever consider Jules Verne to be one of the world's great authors. And yet who ever came to a love of books and reading because of the works of Joyce and Faulkner ands their ilk? Not a damn soul. In fact, The Sound and the Fury and Ulysses can make you rue the day you learned to read. Meanwhile, there are literally millions of us who became avid readers and fell in love with books thanks to the magnificent adventure novels of Jules Verne.
The halls of academia may not overflow with earnest Literature majors studying his work and his prose stylings may not have transformed generations of authors, but, as one of the creators of Science Fiction, he is certainly one of the most influential authors of all time. And in terms of the pure innovation of his plot lines and the imagination and excitement of the stories he told, he is without peer.
But returning to this classic travel tale as an adult, the most pleasant surprise was just how funny a book this is. The phlegmatic Phileas Fogg and Passepartout, his own intrepid Sancho Panza, play off of each other to great effect. And the excitable and dedicated, though badly misguided, Detective Fix makes for an amusing foil for the heroes as he pursues them around the globe and very nearly loses Fogg his wager.
This is simply a grand adventure for readers of all ages.
GRADE: A+
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Around the World in Eighty Days
Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne (Paperback - June 20 2000)
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