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5.0 out of 5 stars Another great book in this series
Anita Blake and Richard are broken up again. He can't seem to deal with his lycanthropy or her relationship with Jean Claude. He is spending the summer finishing up his master's degree, studying the trolls of Tennessee. One day Anita gets a call from his brother Daniel. Richard is in jail for rape. This is totally out of character for Richard, and worse yet, he won't...
Published on Sept. 8 2002 by Moe811

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Once in a...
Apparently the love triangle between Richard Zeeman, Anita Blake and Jean-Claude isn't QUITE over, despite Anita dumping the werewolf to boink the French vampire. Lovely.

But apparently the melodrama is not over yet in "Blue Moon," the eighth novel of the Anita Blake Vampire Hunter series. Laurell K. Hamilton does succeed in creating some suspense and some...
Published on July 5 2009 by E. A Solinas


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Once in a..., July 5 2009
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
Apparently the love triangle between Richard Zeeman, Anita Blake and Jean-Claude isn't QUITE over, despite Anita dumping the werewolf to boink the French vampire. Lovely.

But apparently the melodrama is not over yet in "Blue Moon," the eighth novel of the Anita Blake Vampire Hunter series. Laurell K. Hamilton does succeed in creating some suspense and some intriguing supporting characters with their own woes and worries, but her writing alternates between choppy and painfully florid, and her heroine rapidly ascends the ladder of Mary-Suedom -- she's allegedly smarter, sexier, stronger and more powerful than anyone else.

Anita receives a call from Richard's brother -- Richard is now in jail in Tennessee, accused of raping a local woman. So Anita heads out to Tennessee with a band of vampires and weres, including Asher, Damian and Jason. They're all intent on proving Richard's innocence, and there are only a matter of days until the "blue moon" exposes him as a werewolf.

Oh yeah, and because of Anita's charming and polite personality, the Master of the City regards their arrival as an act of war. Can't blame him, considering what a reasonable, diplomatic person she is. Uh huh.

Unfortunately Richard's frame-up is at the center of a town-wide conspiracy, and a search for an ancient artifact using illegal means. And Colin (aforementioned Master) is determined to mess with the invading group, even to infecting one of the weres with a corrosive decay, while a werewolf first-one-to-catch-Anita-gets-to-rape-her jaunt in the woods leads to a new encounter with Richard. Unfortunately, his family has gotten drawn into this mess.

"Blue Moon" is one of those novels that is overflowing with promise, but only turns out mediocre. It actually is quite strong for the first half -- obviously-untrue rape charges, a sinister town conspiracy, and brewing tensions between two groups of werewolves and vampires. You can almost overlook Hamilton's obvious contempt for women, cops, and anyone who doesn't live in a major city (according to Hamilton, Tennessee is entirely populated by misogynist racist rednecks).

Unfortunately, halfway through everything comes unravelled -- instead we get an endless stream of absurd situations that emphasize one thing: "Anita is the awesomest most powerful person ever, and everyone wants to have sex with her." Rapist werewolves, sneering at her ex-boyfriend's new woman, being possessed by sex-mad werewolf ghosts, and magically fixing everything just by being so awesome and loving. It's actually pretty nauseating to read someone so spectacularly Mary Sueish.

And Hamilton's writing isn't up to saving the story either. The more hardboiled bits are pretty passable although rather choppily written. But when she tries to wrap that hardboiled prose in lush, sensual prose the results are laughable and appallingly awkward ("The two of us knelt bathed in power. A wind trailed Damian's hair across my face, and I knew the wind was us"). And it doesn't help that Anita constantly tosses off clunky fortune-cookie witticisms ("Love sucks. Sometimes it feels good. Sometimes it's just another way to bleed") and appalling similes (a vampire sucking blood is "like a feeding thing." Well, what else would it be?).

The biggest millstone is Anita: abrasive, arrogant, absurdly hypermacho, and pulls superpowers out of her butt at least twice a day. She's also as airheaded as a ping-pong ball. She causes all the plot's problems by howling verbal abuse at the Master of the City, but it never seems to occur to her that this trouble might be her fault. And it's hard to sympathize with someone who whines about how angry it makes her that her ex-boyfriend, whom she cheated on, is having sex with someone else.

The supporting characters are far more likable -- the fragile vampire Asher manages to be far more endearing than Anita ever does, and the werewolf Jason is quite charming at times. Unfortunately most of the vampires are either there to be ego buffs to Anita (Jean-Claude) or damsels in distress (Damian).

"Blue Moon" is a solid urban fantasy riddled with cracks -- and the Grand Canyon in the middle is the alleged heroine. It's a decent light read if you can focus on the supporting cast and the creepy noir moments, and ignore everything else.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Once in a..., Nov. 25 2009
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
This review is from: Blue Moon (Paperback)
Apparently the love triangle between Richard Zeeman, Anita Blake and Jean-Claude isn't QUITE over, despite Anita dumping the werewolf to boink the French vampire. Lovely.

But apparently the melodrama is not over yet in "Blue Moon," the eighth novel of the Anita Blake Vampire Hunter series. Laurell K. Hamilton does succeed in creating some suspense and some intriguing supporting characters with their own woes and worries, but her writing alternates between choppy and painfully florid, and her heroine rapidly ascends the ladder of Mary-Suedom -- she's allegedly smarter, sexier, stronger and more powerful than anyone else.

Anita receives a call from Richard's brother -- Richard is now in jail in Tennessee, accused of raping a local woman. So Anita heads out to Tennessee with a band of vampires and weres, including Asher, Damian and Jason. They're all intent on proving Richard's innocence, and there are only a matter of days until the "blue moon" exposes him as a werewolf.

Oh yeah, and because of Anita's charming and polite personality, the Master of the City regards their arrival as an act of war. Can't blame him, considering what a reasonable, diplomatic person she is. Uh huh.

Unfortunately Richard's frame-up is at the center of a town-wide conspiracy, and a search for an ancient artifact using illegal means. And Colin (aforementioned Master) is determined to mess with the invading group, even to infecting one of the weres with a corrosive decay, while a werewolf first-one-to-catch-Anita-gets-to-rape-her jaunt in the woods leads to a new encounter with Richard. Unfortunately, his family has gotten drawn into this mess.

"Blue Moon" is one of those novels that is overflowing with promise, but only turns out mediocre. It actually is quite strong for the first half -- obviously-untrue rape charges, a sinister town conspiracy, and brewing tensions between two groups of werewolves and vampires. You can almost overlook Hamilton's obvious contempt for women, cops, and anyone who doesn't live in a major city (according to Hamilton, Tennessee is entirely populated by misogynist racist rednecks).

Unfortunately, halfway through everything comes unravelled -- instead we get an endless stream of absurd situations that emphasize one thing: "Anita is the awesomest most powerful person ever, and everyone wants to have sex with her." Rapist werewolves, sneering at her ex-boyfriend's new woman, being possessed by sex-mad werewolf ghosts, and magically fixing everything just by being so awesome and loving. It's actually pretty nauseating to read someone so spectacularly Mary Sueish.

And Hamilton's writing isn't up to saving the story either. The more hardboiled bits are pretty passable although rather choppily written. But when she tries to wrap that hardboiled prose in lush, sensual prose the results are laughable and appallingly awkward ("The two of us knelt bathed in power. A wind trailed Damian's hair across my face, and I knew the wind was us"). And it doesn't help that Anita constantly tosses off clunky fortune-cookie witticisms ("Love sucks. Sometimes it feels good. Sometimes it's just another way to bleed") and appalling similes (a vampire sucking blood is "like a feeding thing." Well, what else would it be?).

The biggest millstone is Anita: abrasive, arrogant, absurdly hypermacho, and pulls superpowers out of her butt at least twice a day. She's also as airheaded as a ping-pong ball. She causes all the plot's problems by howling verbal abuse at the Master of the City, but it never seems to occur to her that this trouble might be her fault. And it's hard to sympathize with someone who whines about how angry it makes her that her ex-boyfriend, whom she cheated on, is having sex with someone else.

The supporting characters are far more likable -- the fragile vampire Asher manages to be far more endearing than Anita ever does, and the werewolf Jason is quite charming at times. Unfortunately most of the vampires are either there to be ego buffs to Anita (Jean-Claude) or damsels in distress (Damian).

"Blue Moon" is a solid urban fantasy riddled with cracks -- and the Grand Canyon in the middle is the alleged heroine. It's a decent light read if you can focus on the supporting cast and the creepy noir moments, and ignore everything else.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A new era for Anita, not for the kiddies!, Jan. 11 2004
By 
Ashley Megan "amazonfox" (Vernon, CT United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
As sexy (maybe more so) as "Killing Dance", with, in my opinion, a tighter plot and a tad less lecturing. Eeeexcellent. Downside: no Jean-Claude (Anita, if you don't want him, there are plenty of women who would), as the werewolf Richard finally gets another chance with the woman who left him for a vampire.
The book opens with Anita being called out of town to help Richard defend himself against rape charges. Naturally, he's being set-up, for the sole purpose of getting him out of the way so the bad guys can do their thing. And naturally, this makes both Anita and Richard stubbornly stick around, very much in harm's way, to thwart their evil-doing. Anita's brought a couple of Richard's werewolves and some of her wereleopards, and with the local werewolf pack, there's a lot of the same discussions about lycanthrope protocol that marred "Killing Dance"; thankfully, Hamilton seems to have toned it down a bit, or maybe she just ran out of things to say.
Much is made of Anita's position as default "lupa" of the werewolves, since Richard hasn't picked another consort since she left him. The wolves don't much like being led by a human - if Anita even is human. It wouldn't be an Anita Blake novel if she didn't gain some sort of new power, so suffice it to say she learns a lot about how to be a lupa by the end of the book. (Her dubious status as Richard's ex-lover is resolved, too - and it's just as hot as anything she's shared so far with Jean-Claude.)

Sometimes Hamilton still stretches things a bit; certain elements are just on the verge of being forced. I'm not sure if I belong to the "this is the beginning of the end" school of thought, although if you think that sex is the downfall of this series than assume that from this point forward you'll be disappointed. Personally, I love the fact that Anita collects lovers like shoes; the fact that so many men are falling all over themselves for her is great! Sex and violence is not for everyone, but if you're not afraid of a strong woman who doesn't always take the high road, you'll be in love with Anita too.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Road to Hell, Sept. 25 2002
This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
I think the most interesting thing about this series is seeing Anita transform slowly from your average PI type into a stone cold Psycho. It happens so slowly it becomes unnoticable up until near the end of Blue Moon. Those of you who read it know what I'm talking about. Anita has always killed fairly easily, and thats a good reflex to develop when you're dealing with stuff that can rip you in half. But to see her do the one thing she said she would never do (despite all her despair afterward) was truly amazing. This is not the Anita of Guilty Pleasures. She's still gaiNng a new power every book, (which is annoying...come one Hamilton you've got to come up with something better), and she's still a hypocritcal little prude, but underneath all that she slowly turning into Edward. Thats refreshing.
Richard is still the world's biggest boyscout. Hopefully some of that will end with this book. And Jean Claude...well he's still French. I'd be happy if they both died, that way she'd lose some of her power and go back to relying on wits and steel. But I see that not going to happen, so I hope they work their stuff out and Hamilton finds a new formula. I mean just how many Men are there with Long Hair, exotic eyes, and impossible hansome not quite human bodies are there in Saint Louis?
With all that said, one must realize that this isn't exactly 'deep' reading and its a bit silly to pretend it is. Its entertainment for sado-masochist goth fetishists. Sex and Violence refined to perfection and slapped with a coating of 'good story'. So please don't expect anything more.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Another great book in this series, Sept. 8 2002
By 
Moe811 (New York USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
Anita Blake and Richard are broken up again. He can't seem to deal with his lycanthropy or her relationship with Jean Claude. He is spending the summer finishing up his master's degree, studying the trolls of Tennessee. One day Anita gets a call from his brother Daniel. Richard is in jail for rape. This is totally out of character for Richard, and worse yet, he won't hire a lawyer because he's innocent. With the full moon only five days away, Anita and a few of the monsters rush down to save him. The master of the city will not allow Jean Claude, so Anita is basically on her own. As usual Richard is no help. There is alot more going on here than is obvious. People are being found ripped apart and the attacks are blamed on trolls, even though trolls don't kill. A rich man is trying to buy the trolls habitat to look for holy relics, and the local master is very angry and scared of the Executioner. On a good note, a local witch seems to understand some of Anita's problems and is willing to help.
This as usual was a very gripping novel. Anita is trying to balance the hit man with all of her new responsibilities. Jean Claude helps when it helps him, and Richard is more of a selfish baby than ever. Anita's character is really developing, great series.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Anita to the Rescue!!, April 2 2002
This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
In this 8th book of the series, Anita is still growing as a character. But while growing, she is learning that she has to break a few of her own rules to survive. This book is about alot of things but the undercurrent is basically about Anita's relationships with the werewolfs Jason and Jamil, the wereleopards Nathaniel, Zane and Cherry, and the vampires Asher and Damian. She is taught that not every monster is exactly a monster and that these "people" need reassurence and love too.
At the beginning of the book, Anita drops everything to run to her ex in Tennessee who has been arrested on attemped rape charges. When she gets there she realizes that there is more in the air than the stinch of false charges. She brings with her an assortment of vamps and were, some of which were sent by Jean-Claude, because of a threat by the local master vamp of the city. Anita is still providing protection to those with her as Lupa and Nimir-ra and alot of the book focuses on that fact. Anita learns exactly what it means to be lupa when she is possessed by the munin of a past lupa who hated Anita. She is now having to learn to battle and control the munin before it distroys her. Because of the munin, Anita is thrown into a situation that she cant get out of..but Richard is worried at first but is more than happy to help her. Can we say.. ITS ABOUT TIME!!
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Great Read!, March 26 2002
By 
This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
"Blue Moon" by Laurell K. Hamilton finds our heroine, Anita Blake, necromancer and vampire executioner, at a crossroads in her life. Can she live with the things she has done? How far has she fallen from God's graces? As Anita examines her life, she is involved in yet another dangerous adventure, which sweeps the reader away into Anita's weird and wonderful world.
I have trouble saying this book was excellent, because I am not a Richard fan, and though I have tried really hard to like him, I just can't do it. So, because Anita betrayed Jean-Claude, her super sexy vampire lover, with Richard, who could not be more wrong for her, the entire book was tainted for me as a result. With that said, however, it is still a thrilling and fun-filled read that I did enjoy, just not as much as all the others.
In this 8th instalment of the series, Anita receives a call informing her that her ex-fiancé, Richard Zeeman, junior high science teacher and alpha werewolf, has been arrested for rape in Tennessee. Anita drops everything and goes to help Richard, despite the fact the local Master Vampire has forbidden her to enter his territory.
When Anita arrives, she starts trying to solve the mystery of who would want to frame Richard for rape and why. It becomes immediately obvious that the local police are corrupt, and are trying to run them out of town. But that's not all Anita has on her plate. Colin, the Master Vampire, is giving Anita and her entourage serious problems, threatening them and harming their people. Anita also has to observe the appropriate werewolf politics as she deals with the local werewolf pack. Add in several of Richard's angry ex-girlfriends and a demon and you have one heck of a story!
One thing I really enjoyed in this book was getting to know some of the secondary characters better. We get to see a lot of Anita's wereleopards, Nathaniel, Cherry, and Zane, Jason and Jamil the werewolves, and two of Jean-Claude's vampires, Asher and Damian. Though I liked the inclusion of these seven people as integral characters in the story, I couldn't help but miss Jean-Claude.
"Blue Moon" is most definitely worth reading despite the problems I had with it, which are more due to my personal opinion than actual flaws in the story. Hamilton has once again created a fast-paced and exhilarating tale that will completely absorb readers. When you need to escape from your everyday troubles, Anita's wild world of vampires, werewolves and zombies is the perfect solution. So don't miss out on the fun, buy this book (and all the others) ASAP, I guarantee you won't regret it!
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5.0 out of 5 stars the Name Game, Dec 18 2001
By 
A. Nod (Las Vegas, Nevada, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
Who is Anita? What does she believe in? What does she live for? Herself? God? Who?
In Blue Moon, Anita is at a crossroads. The Point of No Return. Can she live with herself, the things she's done, the things she's pushed to do? Is her faith and love enough? What does Anita want-out of life, love and living? No more putting herself second.
Hamilton gave us non-stop action and constant motion of her characters and plot line. Now, it's a slower, leisurely pace; in other words toned down. Not as much killing, gore and the like, a little more sex.
It's the book that stops and makes Anita examine herself; it is something she can no longer ignore. What is she becoming, the monster within the monster unleashed? She can no longer tell the difference when goes down south to aid Richard of a bogus rape case. The story line isn't that strong, but it's the moral development that really catches you. She's accepting her place as nimir-ra to the wereleopards, and master to Damian. She's changing, in more ways than one and in more ways than is told in the book.
Anita is a crisis with herself and her beliefs. It was bound to happen sooner or later and it's a great place to continue with it, it's more addressed than the last one where it just starts to begin. Ignore those readers who don't understand character development. If Anita continued as before, she'd just become
1-D, rather than 3-D. A real person would most likely go through some self-crisis. Granted, it won't be a favorite, but it's still a really great read. I gave it a five because I love that Anita is questioning herself and its an important step and part of the story; it's something I would have done if I were in her shoes (yeah right! ;))
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5.0 out of 5 stars One Of My Favorites Of The Series, Dec 12 2001
This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
First of all, to the newcomers to Anita Blake: read the books in order! Each book can stand alone, of course, but reading them in order allows you to understand how the characters and their relationships have evolved and deepened.
Having said that, I really love this book! Everyone has their favorites in the series, and this is one of mine. I like it because, as usual, Ms. Hamilton used a lot of characters in the story, but more importantly, the secondary characters' personalities were developed more fully than they had been in a lot of the previous books. There were more in-depth scenes between Anita and Jamil, Jason, Nathaniel, Asher, Cherry, Zane, and Damian, than there had been previously. They became persons in their own right in this book. Jamil and Anita come to terms with their animosity toward each other; Jason's character is expanded and his friendship with Anita grows; the neediness of Nathaniel is finally understood by Anita; Asher's feelings toward Anita are finally exposed; Anita's affect on Damian is explained and their ties are strengthened; and Cherry and Zane become more than convenient wereleopard stand-ins.
For Jean-Claude fans, more is revealed about his motivations and his feelings toward Anita. For Richard fans, he and Anita finally do the deed (at long last, and well worth waiting for). For Anita fans, she begins to come to terms with her role within the wereleopard pard, her relationships with "the boys", and a crisis of faith is resolved. She also learns to deal with her expanding powers resulting from the tightening of the marks that bind her to Richard and Jean-Claude. As an extra bonus, we get to meet Richard's mom, and his brother Daniel.
The story is well-written and is horrific, amusing, graphic, scary, sexy, and witty. It has vampires, werewolves, wereleopards, trolls, corrupt police, a sadistic murderer, a sorcerer, and - worst of all - Richard's angry ex-girlfriends! It is definitely a keeper!
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5.0 out of 5 stars All I can say is "Wow!", Sept. 21 2001
By 
The_Leanansidhe "skremaks" (LaGrange, Kentucky United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Blue Moon (Mass Market Paperback)
I'm sorry to say that I just recently discovered Laurell in the "Out of this World" anthology. I am a serious Nora Roberts fan, and I always buy these anthologies with a touch of regret. After all, I'm paying $8 for a 90 page short story. But I always make myself slog through the rest of the stories just so I can say I got my money's worth. Imagine my surprise when I got to the preview of "Narcissus in Chains." All I could think was "Who is this?!" I literally read the preview 3 times in the same night. Unfortunately, the bookstore was already closed, or I would have been driving to get the rest of her books at midnight! As it was, I was waiting outside the bookstore when it opened the next morning! I bought all of them at once, and started reading as soon as I got home. This was over a month ago, and I am still reading them! I have read "Blue Moon" and "Obsidian Butterfly" 15 times a piece, at least! These are some truly amazing books, and I would recommend them to anyone and everyone! (As a matter of fact, I think I've already gotten a good start on that! LOL)
Happy reading, fellow Anitaphiles!
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Blue Moon
Blue Moon by Laurell K. Hamilton (Mass Market Paperback - March 30 2010)
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