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5.0 out of 5 stars Ideal for coders from students to experts
In the Spring semester of 2003, I am teaching a class in software engineering and the students are creating a large program that is to be written in Java. Not all of the students are experienced in Java, so they are required to learn the language as they follow the rules of software development. At the time when the textbooks were selected, I was not aware of this book...
Published on March 24 2003 by Charles Ashbacher

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3.0 out of 5 stars Good start - Needs a 2nd edition
This book provides a strong basis for establishing the always needed coding standards on every project. But, just as with the classic Elements of Style, it needs an updated edition. One major note that should be addressed is the recommendation on double-checked locking - the fact that this flat out does not work in Java has been well-documented and published on multiple...
Published on Aug. 14 2002 by Richard L. Robinson


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1.0 out of 5 stars Deserves 0 Stars, Feb. 12 2004
By 
This review is from: The Elements of Java(TM) Style (Paperback)
Read Code Complete by Steve McConnell. You don't need this book. It contradicts itself on several occasions and is totally wrong on others. It's unfortunate and sad how many organizations want to adopt texts like this as their "coding standard". A pamplet-sized book of bullet-points can't make developers competent, but a comprehensive manual of the best in software engineering practices like Code Complete can.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Ideal for coders from students to experts, March 24 2003
By 
Charles Ashbacher (Marion, Iowa United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Elements of Java(TM) Style (Paperback)
In the Spring semester of 2003, I am teaching a class in software engineering and the students are creating a large program that is to be written in Java. Not all of the students are experienced in Java, so they are required to learn the language as they follow the rules of software development. At the time when the textbooks were selected, I was not aware of this book and that is unfortunate. It is an excellent quick reference to a set of rules that will point you in the direction of much cleaner and efficient Java code.
In all future classes where I am either teaching Java or having the students use Java to write large programs, this book will be a required acquisition. I have already placed it on my textbook list for software engineering in the Spring of 2004.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Good start - Needs a 2nd edition, Aug. 14 2002
By 
This review is from: The Elements of Java(TM) Style (Paperback)
This book provides a strong basis for establishing the always needed coding standards on every project. But, just as with the classic Elements of Style, it needs an updated edition. One major note that should be addressed is the recommendation on double-checked locking - the fact that this flat out does not work in Java has been well-documented and published on multiple occasions. I look forward to the 2nd edition!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Big little book, June 28 2002
This review is from: The Elements of Java(TM) Style (Paperback)
Great quick reference when it doubt/can't remember. Personal coding style is a myth and is also a dangerous practice!
Good section on following java doc standards with handy performance tuning tips.
Expensive...
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5.0 out of 5 stars A handy reference for producing expert code!, April 19 2002
This review is from: The Elements of Java(TM) Style (Paperback)
Hi there!
This booklet is a significant tool in achieving correct effective and easily maintainable code:
1. Specifying the way code should be written, conforming with sun's coding conventions, keeps the code readable, and Java-docs coherent.
This is especially important when writing the code in a teem, or writing components which will be later used by others.
2. Chapter 5 lists a collection of coding tips, which can quickly turn a beginner programmer into an experienced one.
e.g.
rule 81:
"Do not call nonfinal methods from within a constructor -
Subclasses may override nonfinal methods, and java will dispatch a call to such a method according to the actual type of the constructed object - before executing the derived constructors. This means when the constructor invokes the derived method, the derived class may be in an invalid state. To prevent this, call only final methods from the constructor. "
More about the book:
(note: this booklet does not teach Java, it focuses on the way the code should be written.)
The booklet is fun to use:
1. It is tiny, and fits anywhere.
2. Not intimidating - It is thin and distilled, not like those
huge books you put on the shelf and
never bother to open because you don't
know where to begin looking...
2. It is written in a simple direct logical manner:
a rule and a short explanation (with an example)
of the logic behind it.
3. Easy to locate what you are looking for.
4. every time you open it - you find something new...
In short - a handy reference for producing expert code!
I love it!
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1.0 out of 5 stars bad, very bad, Jan. 2 2002
By 
G. Such "yes-i-am" (barcelona, barcelona Catalunya) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Elements of Java(TM) Style (Paperback)
it's only recommended for the most begginer of the begginers, in general programing not only in java.
Very bad for me and, i think, everybody that has already written and seen any code in any language.
Wasted money.
example:
this is not right
if (something) {
do one thing
do another thing
}
this is right
if (something) {
....do one thing
....do another thing
....}
i guess, everybody knows this.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Coding style is important, Nov. 14 2001
By 
Mark W Mitchell (Roswell, GA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Elements of Java(TM) Style (Paperback)
This book is really a set of rules for coding style. It is good for that, and has common sense rules. However for such a SMALL book, you pay a lot. The content fits in 118 pages that might be found on the web in various forms. So the value of the price is of question to me.
The benefit of purchasing the book is that it makes it handy to look up a style format if you have questions. That is usually the only time I reach for this book - most of it I have been doing for a while.
If you are trying to set a standard in your company/group/etc, and want people to have this, it would be a good one to fill the need. (It is suprising to find out how many people do not know these rules of style).
I think that this book could have been published and sold for five dollars (US) - then I would have given it 5 stars. Its price is my only issue - not its content.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A coding standard for every Java programmer., Nov. 9 2001
By 
Doug Bell "Java guru" (San Diego, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Elements of Java(TM) Style (Paperback)
A good coding standard should focus on advice that encourages the correct and consistent application of a language. The more widely-adopted a standard is, the more benefit. No less than the Java Language Specification acknowledges this by listing a limited set of naming and usage practices. While the JLS falls far short of establishing a complete coding standard, the naming conventions it established have alone been of great benefit to the Java community. The "Elements of Java Style" nicely fills the gap left by the JLS in other areas, although it too falls a little short in places--thus the 4 star rating instead of 5.
I strongly suggest "Effective Java" by Joshua Bloch as a companion to this book. Whereas the 108 rules in this book focus on style, format and many pearls of practical advice, "Effective Java" provides an excellent set of 57 rules that go much deeper and tackle more advanced aspects of writing correct and consistent code. The two books complement each other well.
Of the 108 rules, the most glaring technical error is rule #99 which promotes the use of the flawed double-check synchronization pattern. Ignore this rule.
The 108 rules are divided into six chapters as follows:
4 General Principles: While I would have added a few, the four here are quite sound.
4 Formatting Conventions: Programmers tend to get weird about code format. After long enough you realize any reasonable and consistently adhered to standard is fine, so just use this well-considered set.
23 Naming Conventions: These are of great benefit as they resolve the ambiguities left by the JLS. I especially like rule #12, "Join the vowel generation".
35 Documentation Conventions: These very well-reasoned conventions will help to produce useful documentation as well as to eliminate unnecessary or excessively wordy documentation. The rules target both internal and external documentation as emphasize the different goals of each.
37 Programming Conventions: While there is a lot of good advice in this section, it also contains some of the weakest advice. Rule #74 on enumerations is flawed ("Effective Java" provides better coverage on how to use enumeration classes). The section on using assertions (4 rules) doesn't mention the important rule to only use tests with no side effects. It will also need to be modified for the assertion facility being added in J2SE 1.4. The section on threads and synchronization is the weakest (7 rules) as it contains rule #99 as well as some weak and incomplete advice in rules #97 and #98.
5 Packaging Conventions: This section contains some good advice not just on how to organize your classes into packages, but also on how to design stable packages.
Particularly on points of style and format, individuals will find aspects of any coding standard (at least any standard they didn't author) that they disagree with. Having written several coding standards in a variety of languages, I too have some rules I would have written differently. However, the benefit of a language-wide coding standard is that if everyone follows it, then everyone benefits from that shared agreement.
My company has adopted "The Elements of Java Style" as its coding standard with as few amendments as possible. You and your company should too.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I'm reading it day-by-day, Aug. 29 2001
By 
Goldin Evgeny (Berlin, Germany) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Elements of Java(TM) Style (Paperback)
If you're concerned about writing a Code that you and other people will understand,
respect and maintain - this book is for you. Some people throw out the code like
they throw clothes to laundry machine .. I personally don't like them.
Get a style, be precise and accurate, become familiar with "must-know" idioms,
read this book. Well, I'm opening it again right now.
Those who wrote it - thank you, folks ! Good job.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Useful for (but not organized for) begginers and experts, July 18 2001
This review is from: The Elements of Java(TM) Style (Paperback)
This book shows rules mostly for teams or advanced Java programers; however, some parts can be useful also as a reference for starters or intermediate programers.
Those rules are not organized by levels (say, from basic to intermediate, or from simple programs to team projects), but by topics: The book has conventions on formatting, naming, documentation, programming and packaging.
Not all the rules and conventions have examples, so you must know the Java language in depth (or have experience in programming) to understand some of them.
At the end of the book you'll find a summary of all the 108 rules and a glossary. The summary is convenient for quick reference or reviewing.
It will not help you to learn programming. It is a good complement for your favorite Java manual.
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The Elements of Java(TM) Style
The Elements of Java(TM) Style by Jim Shur (Paperback - Jan. 28 2000)
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