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4.4 out of 5 stars
The Colour of Magic
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on August 10, 2015
Enchanting!!
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on July 9, 2015
I'm just getting into the Disc world series and already I am extremely impressed. I started by reading Night Watch randomly and when I found out that it was part of this huge series I was ecstatic! Colour of Magic is excellent, funny and adventurous. I recommend it everywhere and to everyone!
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on April 11, 2015
Read it in one sitting. Fantastic story, incredibly written.
If you like things such as The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, you'll like this book.
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on November 21, 2014
fun read, I wanted to read some of the disc world books and thought I would start at the beginning. cant wait to get the next one.
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on July 16, 2014
For anyone who likes alternative worlds, great storylines, humour, clever observations of people and a light easy read, this book and its sequel The Light Fantastic (the only sequel I know of from Terry Pratchett) are highly recommended.
Don't blame me if you become as hooked on the Discworld Series as I am!
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on November 29, 2012
What an insane book.
For the first 40 pages I had no idea who was who or what was what. And by the end, Im still not entirely sure.
One minute we're in a city, then inside a tree... a temple. Now we're flying on Dragons! No sorry, we're on an Airplane.
Conversations with DEATH? "Your not DEATH. Piss Off"
*Ka-Boom!*

"... And Now For Something, COMPLETELY DIFFERENT"
~ John Cleese

This book really is a hoot. There is a major lack of solid story, which is why I compare it to Monty Python.
Throughout the entire book, I saw in my mind RINCEWIND, the Wizard as John Cleese.
Its not about reaching a goal, "We start an adventure ... Action ... we reach the end. THE END"
Its more about the adventure and the laughs and the total, mind boggling crazy crap that goes on throughout every single page of this absolutely bonkers novel.

Do I recommend this book?
Im not sure, it depends on what kind of person you are.
Though if you are a fan of that British charm that comes with TV Classics like, Fawlty Towers, Monty Python, Dads Army, Red Dwarf, Black Adder and such, then this is definitely a book worth a read.
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The title of my review pretty much says it all. This is a whitty, satirical book like the Hitchiker series, only it draws upon fantasy cliches and ideas. That's not to say the fantasy within is purely unoriginal. There are lots of interesting thoughts and ideas within. But the book also pokes fun at such fantasy legends as Conan, Fafhrd and Grey Mouser, and Dungeons and Dragons. The story basically deals with a tourist from one strange land visiting another. The tourist is paired up with a failed wizard. The wizard is overly cautious, the tourist is almost completely without regard to danger or fear. Overall, it was a quick, fun, and funny read. This isn't timeless, five-star reading, but if you like some good humor in your books, I'd recommend it.
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on September 29, 2010
It's awesome satire. Satire at it's best. Well done Terry Pratchett.The Color of Magic: A Discworld Novel
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on March 3, 2010
I generally like fantasy literature. The fact that there are so many novels in the Discworld series amazed me so I tried to give a try to the first book of the series. After finishing it, it seems obvious to me now that I am not the targeted reader for this series and I strongly doubt that I will be compelled to read another novel of this author...

I really liked the world created by the author. Very original. The characters however are a parody of the widespread and common fantasy characters. And this is where the problem lies for me. I did not like at all the sense of humor of the author. It reminded me of the jokes my friends and I were making when we were 12-13 years old, when we were running out of ideas in our Dungeons & Dragons games. As an example of this, the whole plot of this book starts with the arrival of a tourist in a medieval-type city (the first tourist in the history of this world), who is kind of an actuary working for an insurance company. Not my cup of tea.
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on January 26, 2007
"The Color of Magic" is the first book in Terry Pratchett's hugely popular Discworld Series. He has gone on to win the Carnegie Medal for "The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents" and was awarded the OBE in 1998.

The Discworld is, of course, flat and rests on the shoulders of four giant elephants. These are, in turn, carried through the cosmos by an even bigger turtle called Great A'Tuin. (The astrozoologists of the land of Krull, in their desire to better understand the universe, shortly hope to determine whether A'Tuin is male or female). The Discworld's Gods and Goddesses live in Dunmanifestin, on top of Cori Celesti. Their favourite pastimes include playing games with the lives of mortals, with Fate and the Lady featuring highly amongst the leading players.

One of the Lady's favourite 'pieces' is Rincewind - a native of the Discworld's oldest city, Ankh-Morpork, and a coward of some renown. He is also an ex-student of the Unseen University, a thoroughly hopeless wizard and the 'hero' of this book. The only spell he knows comes from the Octavo, and is so powerful that no other spell is brave enough to stay in his head. (The Octavo was the Creator's spellbook, and was carelessly left behind after the universe's completion). As the book opens, Rincewind's home city is in flames and he is fleeing in the company of Twoflower - the Discworld's first tourist. Twoflower, who has just introduced the concept of fire insurance to Ankh-Morpork, comes from the Counterweight Continent and has hired Rincewind as his guide. He also has a very loyal and frequently angry Luggage, which is made from sapient pearwood. Twoflower desperately wants to see the very things that Rincewind desperately wants to avoid - heroes (Hrun the barbarian, for example), dragons, fights and such like. As a result, Death has been snapping at Rincewind's heels since he first met Twoflower - that is, of course, the tall and under-fed gentleman who wears a hood, carries a scythe and TALKS LIKE THIS. To avoid meeting his fate, Rincewind is willing to travel to the very ends of the world...

As the first book in the Discworld series, this is probably the most obvious place to start. (It's certainly best to read it before "The Light Fantastic", the series' second instalment - while the pair form a prelude to "Interesting Times", the seventeenth Discworld book). Pratchett's books are always very funny, and Rincewind and the Luggage are two of my favourite characters. Definitely recommended !
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