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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 8th grade girl's perspective on Pride and Prejudice
Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen, follows society's elite through the trials and tribulations of love, pride, money, and marriage negotiations. This novel takes place in 19th century England and revolves around the slow development of love found between two characters. The first of these characters is Elizabeth Bennet, a clever, beautiful, and spirited young woman...
Published on Nov. 9 2003 by Arianne's BMS Literary Corner

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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A Review of Pride and Prejudice
Pride and Prejudice is a classic, early 19th century novel about love and everything that gets in the way of it. Jane Austen uses impeccable, meticulous language full of long descriptions and explanations to give the reader insight into the minds of all the characters. The character development indicates the author's striking understanding of human nature and acute...
Published on May 17 2002


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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 8th grade girl's perspective on Pride and Prejudice, Nov. 9 2003
This review is from: Pride and Prejudice (Mass Market Paperback)
Pride and Prejudice, by Jane Austen, follows society's elite through the trials and tribulations of love, pride, money, and marriage negotiations. This novel takes place in 19th century England and revolves around the slow development of love found between two characters. The first of these characters is Elizabeth Bennet, a clever, beautiful, and spirited young woman. Pride and Prejudice begins, when Mrs. Bennet asks Mr. Bennet to call on their new neighbor, Mr. Bingley. Mr. Bingley has an income of 5 thousand pounds a year and is not married, so Mrs. Bennet hopes to marry one of her 5 daughters to him. Jane, the eldest daughter, and Mr. Bingley begin to like each other during a ball. Elizabeth, the second oldest, meets Mr. Darcy at the same ball. Darcy initially does not care for Elizabeth, and refuses to even dance with her.
However, as Elizabeth grows to dislike Darcy, Darcy starts to become very fond of her. She and Darcy meet again when she stays with Mr. Bingley, because her sister, Jane, has taken ill at their house. Ms. Bingley, the sister of Mr. Bingley, herself hopes to wed Darcy, and seeks to make Elizabeth less appealing to Darcy. After Jane's recovery she and Elizabeth return home. There they welcomed to their home by their cousin Mr. Collins, who, because of the inheritance customs of the times (the Bennet girls had no brothers), was the heir to the Bennet family home. Together, Elizabeth and her family travel to town, where they met Mr. Wickham. Mr. Wickham notices Elizabeth, who he found charming, and describes to her a terrible deed he alleges Darcy had committed against him. Wickham claimed that Darcy owed him money and had denied him of a promised avocation. This new information causes Elizabeth to despise Darcy even more.
Soon Mr. Collins, the rather odd clergyman, proposes to Elizabeth. To her mother's dismay, she refuses him. Instead, her friend Charlotte Lucas marries Mr. Collins, and Elizabeth goes to visit them and their neighbor the great Lady Catherine De Bourgh. During her stay Elizabeth sees Darcy again, and he proposes. Elizabeth refuses, reciting all the terrible things he had done, including the mistreatment of Wickham. In response, Darcy writes Elizabeth explaining how Wickham had tried to elope with his sister because of her money. Elizabeth is forced to rethink, her opinions relating to Darcy and Wickham.
That summer Elizabeth traveled to Pemberly on holiday with her aunt and uncle, and while there her aunt and uncle wanted to see the beautiful Darcy estate. While visiting, Darcy showed up. Darcy and his sister heartily welcomed Elizabeth and her aunt and uncle, and invited them to dinner. Elizabeth began to grow fonder of Darcy. Dreadful news arrived during Elizabeth's stay at Pemberly. Her frivolous younger sister Lydia had run off with Wickham. Upon learning of the circumstances, Darcy sought out and found Wickham and Lydia, forcing them to marry. Elizabeth and her aunt and uncle returned to the Bennet home.
Bingley and Darcy together visited the Bennet household to call upon Jane and Elizbeth. Jane became engaged to Bingley, and when Darcy proposed to Elizabeth, her heart had changed, so she said yes. Elizabeth had fallen in love Darcy. They had both seen past their pride and past the prejudices that they had learned from society. Elizabeth and Darcy were happy in marriage, and remained forever grateful to Elisabeth's aunt and uncle for uniting them.
I would recommend the book Pride and Prejudice. It forces each of us to think about our roles in life. The novel also makes us think about our own pride and our own prejudices against others, and the need for us to learn more about people before we judge them. This book is also one of the greatest Romances of all time, bringing to life the love that a man and a woman held for each other from another era. It provides meaningful messages that all of us should learn. The characters are also interesting. This book is good for people who understand the use of language in the 19th century. Pride and Prejudice is a classic novel that I love, and believe everyone would enjoy.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "I am a gentleman's daughter!", Dec 4 2012
This review is from: Pride and Prejudice (Paperback)
So goes Elizabeth's passionate defence of her family against the horrid Lady Catherine near the end of the novel. Jane Austen's wonderful, funny, smart, and captivating. She is one of my favourite authors period. She writes in such a modest, perceptive way that you don't notice at first all the trickery that goes on with her narrators. It's beautiful and highly thought-out. She makes me feel stupid.

'Pride and Prejudice' is such a famous work that writing anything about it seems hard without repeating things already said. It's about Elizabeth Bennett's education, and it is entertaining in every way. You'll meet the loveable Mr. Bingley, Mr. Collins the lickspittle, Mrs. Bennet the match-maker, Mr. Bennet the bystander, and Mr. Darcy: the stuck-up owner of Pemberley with a heart of gold. It's one of those novels where all its characters face some kind of challenge or crisis. Jane Austen judges them by what they get from those crises. I love her for the way she makes us hate Darcy in the beginning, love Elizabeth in the beginning, and then makes us chuckle when we realize how foolish both of them were towards the end.

Definite recommendation for anyone who wants to read a good book!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, July 14 2014
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This review is from: Pride and Prejudice (Paperback)
love this book
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5.0 out of 5 stars Love it!, June 15 2014
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This review is from: Pride and Prejudice (Paperback)
Love it! It's neither thick nor heavy, so it's pretty easy to carry around. I'm gonna read this book on my flight.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good, but spelling errors., April 8 2014
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This review is from: Pride and Prejudice (Paperback)
I'm happy with this copy of Pride and Prejudice, although there are some spelling errors I came across in this copy, and in the blurb on the back. "Jane Auslen" instead of Jane Austen. If you're looking for a review of the book I highly recommend reading it, it's an amazing novel!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A witty woman, a display of stupidity and a parade of bizarre marriages, June 30 2013
By 
Ladybug (Montreal, Qc) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Pride and Prejudice (Paperback)
In her second novel, Jane Austen tells the story of Elizabeth Bennet, a bright 21 year-old woman, who is determined to marry only if she has the deepest love and respect for her future husband. Those are not her feelings when she first encounters Mr Darcy, who at first seems like a pride and cold gentleman. In fact she prefers Mr Wickham, an old acquaintance of Mr Darcy who considers himself as having been wrongfully treated by him. But is this truly the case or will Mr Darcy, upon further acquaintance, reveal himself to be more than the personification of pride itself?

Of all Jane Austen’s novels, this one remains my absolute favorite for here she depicts with wit and humor all that she sees of human stupidity in Mr Collins , silliness in Mrs Bennet and her 3 younger daughters, as well as cynicism in Mr Bennet. This romantic novel is also a parade of the most bizarre of marriages: from loveless to senseless, without forgetting a catastrophic elopement, Pride and Prejudice has it all. But all this would be nothing without the presence of the spirited Elizabeth Bennet and Mr Darcy who’s many encounters and witty/intellectual matches makes me love them and consider them as one of Jane Austen’s most powerful couple. This is simply a masterpiece.

For more about this book and many more, visit my blog at :

ladybugandotherbookworms.blogspot.com
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5.0 out of 5 stars A very fun, easy and light read, March 22 2013
By 
Tannis Silver "awesome" (Winnipeg, MB) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This book is every bit as enjoyable as it was in the period it was written. It is enjoyable, the characters are engaging and feel realistic, and it deserves its long lasting reputation. Have fun!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A truth universally acknowledged, May 16 2010
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
"Pride and Prejudice" is undoubtedly one of the most beloved classic novels in history -- it's had countless adaptations, sequels and homages lavished on it over the years.

And Jane Austen's grand opus is still beloved for a good reason. While it's rather stuffily written much of the time, it has a vibrant core of witty dialogue and strong characters that shine like lanterns in the night -- and the best part of it is the interplay between the two strong-willed main characters, whose initial dislike of one another blossoms into love once they learn how to overcome his pride and her prejudice.

The Bennett family is in an uproar when wealthy Mr. Bingley moves into the neighborhood, and Mrs. Bennett is especially happy when he takes a liking to the eldest Bennett daughter Jane -- since their estate is entailed and there is no Mr. Bennett Jr., a good marriage is considered essential for at least one of the girls. But her forthright, independent sister Lizzie immediately butts heads with wealthy, aloof Mr. Darcy, who scorns the rural village and seems haughty about everything.

A flurry of proposals, road trips and friendships happen over the course of the following months, with Lizzie fending off her slimy cousin Mr. Collins, and befriending the flirty, hunky Wickham, who claims to have been wronged by Darcy. Lizzie believes Wickham's account -- and she's in for a shock when Darcy unexpectedly proposes, and reveals what Wickham won't tell her about both of their past lives, and what Wickham did to offend Darcy.

And finally things take a scandalous turn when Lizzie's idiotic younger sister Lydia elopes with Wickham, while staying with a friend in Brighton. The family is plunged into disgrace, which also wrecks any chances of a halfway decent marriage for the other daughters. The only one who can set things right is Darcy, who will do whatever he must to make amends to Lizzie -- and unwittingly establish himself as the man she loves as well...

Reading "Pride and Prejudice" is a bit like watching someone embroider a piece of cloth with subtle, intricate designs. Lots of balls, dances, visits and drawing room banter between Lizzie and virtually everyone else, and interwoven with some rather opinions from Jane Austen about haughty aristocrats, marriages of security, entailment, and the whole idea of what an ideal woman has (intellect and strength).

The only real problem: Jane Austen writes very much in the style of her literary era -- it's rather formal and stuffy much of the time, and the narrative is kept distant from the characters. So, not for casual readers.

But despite that formality, Austen's brilliance as a writer is evident -- she slowly unfolds the plot one act at a time, with several intricate subplots that tie together and play off each other. She also wrote some unbelievably sharp-edged dialogue with plenty of witty banter between Lizzie and Darcy ("I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine"). But Austen also weaves in startlingly romantic moments between them ("No one admitted to the privilege of hearing you, can think anything wanting").

It's hard to imagine a better fictional couple than Lizzie and Darcy, despite their rocky start (a major-league snub at a dance). Both are witty, smart, and a bit snotty in their own ways, with quick minds and even quicker tongues. Darcy is a selfish, rather haughty man man who gradually becomes warm and kind, while Lizzie is strong, independent, and Darcy's equal in every way. And neither will marry for anything but true love.

It also has a solid supporting cast: the painfully practical Charlotte Lucas, slimy clerics, virtuous-looking rakes, sisters ranging from saintly to snobby, and the lovable Mr. Bingley and perpetually optimistic Jane. Lizzie's family also adds plenty of color to the story, including the screechy and hilariously mercurial Mrs. Bennett and the barb-tongued Mr. Bennett ("Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins, and I will never see you again if you do").

Despite its mildly stuffy style, "Pride and Prejudice" is the ultimate Jane Austen novel -- a powerful and romantic story about two people who grow and change because of love. An absolute must-read.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A Review of Pride and Prejudice, May 17 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Pride and Prejudice (Mass Market Paperback)
Pride and Prejudice is a classic, early 19th century novel about love and everything that gets in the way of it. Jane Austen uses impeccable, meticulous language full of long descriptions and explanations to give the reader insight into the minds of all the characters. The character development indicates the author's striking understanding of human nature and acute observation of human tendencies. The story provides an intricate plot involving the intertwining lives and feelings of a few characters and is based more on character development than on actual events. Although the book is complex and somewhat wordy, it is interesting and not all that difficult to read. The story shows how individual tendencies and personalities can get in the way of love and happiness. It also adeptly portrays inter-family relationships and the profound impact they can have. I would recommend this book to anyone interested in classic fiction, or who enjoys stories about people and their relationships with one another.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This charming novel can still captivate readers, June 4 2008
By 
Amy (Mississauga, ON Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Pride and Prejudice (Paperback)
It is hard to add new insights to the hundreds of reviews on Pride and Prejudice that appear on Amazon, but I will say that after reading this much loved and celebrated novel, I found it charming and delightful. Austen's exploration of marriage and gender still stands the test of time two centuries later. The language is witty and well-mannered, a true reflection of the time in which Austen penned the book, and there is humour to be found here as well in some of the secondary characters. As one who does not frequently read classic literature, this book was well worth the time it took to read! Highly recommended. [Amy MacDougall]
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Pride and Prejudice
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (Mass Market Paperback - Dec 1 1983)
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