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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As Wonderful a Tale as has Ever Been Told
I couldn't put it down, man. I checked this book out at the local library and read through the opening 130 pages in one sitting until I was falling asleep at three in the morning. Lewis Carroll's classic tale of adventure and fantasy "Alice in Wonderland" is one of the best books I've ever read.
The story is about a little girl, Alice, who falls into a very deep...
Published on Sept. 22 2003 by Stacey Cochran

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars A review about "Alice's Adventures In Wonderland"
To me this was an average book. The characters are mostly animals with different personalities and can talk, so the characters were okay, but to me they could have been improved on. By this I mean they could have come to life more. Some animals were the white rabbit and the cat like in the disney movie. The overall theme of the book is for Alice(the main character)to...
Published on Jan. 15 2001 by Rowena Conway


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars As Wonderful a Tale as has Ever Been Told, Sept. 22 2003
By 
Stacey Cochran (Raleigh, NC, USA) - See all my reviews
I couldn't put it down, man. I checked this book out at the local library and read through the opening 130 pages in one sitting until I was falling asleep at three in the morning. Lewis Carroll's classic tale of adventure and fantasy "Alice in Wonderland" is one of the best books I've ever read.
The story is about a little girl, Alice, who falls into a very deep rabbit hole, seemingly straight to the middle of the earth! Her adventures once she lands are as wonderfully imagined as any in the history of literature. Her encounters with the White Rabbit, the Mad Hatter, the King and Queen of Hearts, the Duchess, The Mock Turtle, The Gryphon, and The Wise Old Caterpillar are as fun and as pure and as well intended as any characters I've ever read a writer write.
The story behind how Alice in Wonderland came to be is equally interesting, and one worth reading up on. That Carroll wrote it without any pretension to selling it, or for money, or even to publish it, is truly one of the remarkable stories of world literature. His motives were pure, and (at least to me) this is one of the reasons why this book is so dear and so readable.
I highly recommend "Alice in Wonderland" to readers young and old and can only say that I look forward to reading "Through the Looking Glass" next! A marvelous, wonderful book, as fun as any book I've ever read.
Yours,
Stacey
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Alice in Wonderland- once scared me, now is cool, July 1 2003
By A Customer
My mom first read this book to me when I was seven years old. Because I was only in first or second grade, Alice in Wonderland scared the heck out of me. I remember parts were pretty horrific and confusing. I kind of hated it. It was like Stephen King for a first grader- which, if you ever go to a website on Lewis Carroll, shouldn't surprise anyone because Carroll had loads of problems and was pretty much tripped out while writing this (I think).
Now that I'm older, I decided to re-read Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. While reading it, it's hard to decide whether this is just a load of imaginative creativity, or a metaphor of something deeper that is true in society today, or true in the 1800's. Well, I guess you can read it either way- but there is definitely some deep stuff in here. Many poems will stop and make you think, and as the story progresses you can't help but feel like you are Alice (which is pretty amazing, because this isn't like Lord of the Rings or anything, it's basically a fairy tale on drugs).
Definitely, definitely, definitely do not hesitate to pick this book up and read. Another review said it was disturbing- well, in some ways it really is. But the characters and the plot line (or lack of!) keep you interested and keeps you reading. AIW and TTLG are must-haves in anyone interested in fantasy/sci-fi, along with Chronicles of Narnia and other great classics.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Positively enchanting......., June 15 2004
By 
Dusty "dusty_or" (Portland, OR United States) - See all my reviews
Years ago while we were on a trip I picked up three summer classics for some light reading. One of them was 'Alice'....Even tho I had read it as a child, I had forgotten just how wonderful Carroll's book was......Recently I was in a bookstore and noted that once again summer classics are out and it was in the pile once again. It can be read and enjoyed by all ages, but I think the subtleties can be best enjoyed by those who are a bit older e.g. the Mad Hatter's Tea Party, the croquet game featuring the Queen of Hearts etc. I was reminded of how much the tea party reminded me of a previous job that I had involving a variety of board members.
I guess there is only only one word to describe this classic, 'timeless'.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A stunning rendition of a classic, March 14 2004
By A Customer
This is a must for "Alice" collectors of all ages. The art is beautiful and the design is unusual.
I disagree with the Booklist reviewer that the design makes for difficult reading or is distracting. The design flourishes enhance the reading experience.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pysco but Cool, Feb. 15 2002
By A Customer
In this book you find out about a little girl named Alice who falls down big holes, eats strange mushrooms, and shakes a chess piece so hard that it turns into her kitten. Join Alice in her adventures in wonderland and through the looking glass. This book is so totaly unpredictable and exiting that you can't put it down. It also makes you wonder and wish this could happen to you. Take a walk through Alice's imagination and read this book.
(I'm so cool.)
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5.0 out of 5 stars More than meets the eye.........., April 14 2004
By 
Sesquiltera "sesquiltera" (Xenu City, Teegeeack) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
THIS IS A BOOK WICH ONE SHOULD ANALYSE FOR ONESELF!
And NO, one cannot overanalyse this book, the symbols in it are like the branches of a tree. The branches keep expanding until they end in fruits and seeds, the seeds thereoff will fall unto the ground and transform into another tree wich also has seeds and the cycle will continue ad infinitum.
One of the most important symbols is the transformation trough eating pastry or drinking liquids, wich will make one bigger or smaller. The pastry or the liquids as clusters of thought wich will transform ones shape in nonphysical reality. Have you ever encountered someone who was very short or small in appearant reality yet he/she displayed a posture of magnificent greatness? Well, it is not a wild argument to state that he/she took a bite of the cookie or a zip of the magick potion....
Another thing very important are the playing cards. The metaphor as life as a game, yourself batteling a whole armada of playing cards spades, hearts and diamonds alike!
Then there is the eloquent buffoonery one engages upon in the teaparty of life (remember the rabbit and the hatsalesman?). This reminded me very much of the people one encounters in everyday life who seem to not be able to think clearly, to be out of syntax with the axioms of logic. These people will resort to various kinds of practices like palmistry or speaking with angels, they have postulated their delusions into actuallity.
But of course, to transcend beyond this and to show you a way out one has to engage upon our magickal cat (but usually one will just bumb into him at the least expected moment). This can be seen as a mentor, a guidepost or even a magickian!
What will be the metaphor of your life? What territory will define your map?
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5.0 out of 5 stars Alice's magical world, Jan. 23 2004
By A Customer
Alice in Wonderland is my favorite book, and it has the sequel Through the Looking glass. This book is fantasy with a lot of humor in it. When I was little someone who came to our house gave the book to me. I never started reading it until I was in the 5th grade. But still I thought the book was too long so I never finished it in 5th grade. But in 6th grade I read the whole book and loved it, and I read it again this year. I think I could read this book 1 million times and still want to read it 1million times again!
In the first story, Alice in Wonderland, It is about a girl named Alice. Alice is in this wonderful, magical place where creatures she never thought of come to life. It all starts with a white rabbit holding a pocket watch saying, "I'm late, I'm late." Alice is very curious (who wouldn't be!) so she follows him and ends up falling through a hole, and it is a long, long fall. She comes to a room where strange things happen to Alice. She has a tea party with mad, crazy people, she meets the queen and finds out that the queen isn't decent at all!
In the second story, Through the Looking glass, Alice meets a bunch of weird creatures. Alice steps into looking glass house where she is in a giant chess game and on her way to becoming queen Alice. And a lot of exciting and weird things happen along the way.
I highly recommend this book to anyone in the 6th grade up. It is the kind of book that you can't stop reading. You get attached to the characters, and books that do that to me, I love, because you know you are enjoying the book. So if you like fantasy and like to have a few laughs, this is the book you have to read!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A warm, funny work, Jan. 13 2004
Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass are probably some of the most famous children's books in the English anguage. There are two ends to the spectrum of interpreting them.
On the one end, the books are seen as wonderful and innocent entertainment mainly for kids but also suitable for adults. It is innovative and chaotic and performs puns and wordplay on the English language as well as concepts. They are accompanied by great quality illustrations and have a sense of fun and adventure about them.
On the other end, the books are seen as elaborate allegories. Everything is symbolic. The tales are reminiscent of an LSD induced fantasy. Everything is Freudian and academic and open to postmodern interpretation and of course there's the disturbing question of Carrol's supposed obsession with little girls.
Having read - and loved - the books, I think the truth lies somewhere in the middle. Yes, they seem to be oriented primarily for children but that doesn't mean adults can't get anything more than nostalgia out of them. Yes they are rich in some symbolism but it is unwise to overanalyse and read too much extraneous ideas into them.
Highly recommended to be read as what they are - the product of an amazing mind, which saw the world of children as the ground in which to sow ideas both fun and profound. All the semi-philosophical talks, nonsense poems, fantastical creatures combine to make an unforgettable work.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Classic Storytelling, July 8 2003
By 
James Duckett (St. George, Utah) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I have grown up watching Disney's Alice in Wonderland, and knowing what liberties Disney is known to take in their movies, I wanted to read the original story for myself.
And I'm glad I did. Lewis Carol was such a wonderful storyteller, full of imagination and creative use of the English language.
This was two stories in one. The first, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, I thought had more imagination and he action seemed to flow faster with more scenes and challenges for Alice to deal with. The characters are fantastic and highly imaginative.
The second story, Through the Looking Glass, also had a lot of imagination, but it didn't seem to have as fast a pace as the first book. Still, I found it fascinating as the story was done as if Alice were a chess piece moving across a chess board to reach the other side as a pawn to become a queen. As she moved up the chess board, she encountered different characters and situations.
Highly recommended, even if it was written as a child's book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Book, April 20 2003
By A Customer
Wonderland is a truly fascinating place to read about.
I love the illustrations in the original versions---and HATE the later illustrations that were done as the book was published over and over. In fact, I once tried to read a copy from the 1980's but I couldn't go on with it because the pictures were bothering me. Luckily, there's really only one freaky illustration in the original version, and that's the picture where Alice's neck is very long. It's a bit disturbing.
But the book is well written and a good adventure story, too.
I love the characters. They're very interesting.
"'Well, then,' the Cat went on, 'you see a dog growls when it's angry, and wags its tail when it's pleased. Now I growl when I'm pleased, and wag my tail when I'm angry. Therefore I'm mad.'"
- "The Chesire Cat", Alice In Wonderland, by Lewis Carroll
Come to think of it, the Chesire cat illustration is actually quite creepy as well. But it's not a big deal or anything.
The whole book's just weird fun. Where in the world did Mr. Carroll think of all this? The Mad Hatter? The Queen of Hearts? The Duchess and her pig baby?
Alice herself is a considerably strange character.
All in all, aside from a couple of creepy illustrations, the book is wonderful. Everyone should read it once in their lifetime---it's worth it.
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Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll (Paperback - May 1 1984)
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