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4.5 out of 5 stars
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland & Through the Looking-Glass
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Showing 1-10 of 21 reviews(3 star)show all reviews
on January 15, 2001
To me this was an average book. The characters are mostly animals with different personalities and can talk, so the characters were okay, but to me they could have been improved on. By this I mean they could have come to life more. Some animals were the white rabbit and the cat like in the disney movie. The overall theme of the book is for Alice(the main character)to get out of Wonderland. On her way home, she meets very strange characters and gets into trouble. One event I found interesting is when she meets the Mad Hatter and the March Hare. Their first encounter was interesting but it was when they met again that I thought was good. Another event is near the end with the Queen of Hearts. To find out what actually occurred pick up the book and read it. Alice is a young girl who wishes there were more things in life and one day when she was out side with her sister she spots this white rabbit with a coat on and a pocket watch. She starts to follow it. She followed it through a rabbit hole and as she hit a soft spot on the ground Alice falls into a hole. That's when the adventure begins and you will have to read the book to find out what happens. Enjoy reading "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland".
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on January 14, 2001
I just read this book for an Honors English class, and I got exactly what I expected. Lewis Carroll has an unique writing style; it is unlike anything that I have read before. His use of words give a sharp image in the reader's head, just like as if they were actually there. He uses excellent imagery. His descriptions on every single character were great,and that was one thing that I enjoyed. An example of his descriptions is in the beginning of chapter six, when Alice sees a footman in front of a house. Carroll describes the footman "with a found face, and large eyes like a frog". He is one of the few authors that take the time to describe the supplementary characters. The main character is , of course, Alice. She is very adventurous, and this is seen throughout the book. Anything that she sees that is new, she will try it. In the very beginning of her adventures, she sees a potion that is laying around, and in hopes of getting into the garden that she saw earlier, she drank some of it, just because it said "drink me". The potion made her very small, which eventually became an adventure within itself. Another example was when she went to play croquet with the queen. They played croquet with hedgehogs as balls and flamingoes as sticks. Alice didn't care what the adventure was, as long as she was a part of it.She also didn't hesitate to express her opinions. When the queen was executing everyone in her path, Alice spoke up about what she was doing. People who like adventurous characters would like Alice. The theme of this book to me is if you see something new, you should try it just for the fun of doing something new. It is shown by Alice's different adventures, like what I mentioned in the previous paragraphs. I didn't really get the plot of this story. I thought that it was to get to the garden that she saw in the beginning of the book. I think that I didn't get it because Carroll jumped from one adventure without finishing the previous one. That is one of the reasons why I gave this book three stars out of five. I didn't like this story, partially because it was fantasy. I just read it to try something different. I would recommend this book to readers who like reading fantasy and who like to use their imaginations while reading. I don't know why it is a big children's classic, but I didn't like when I was in elementary school and I still don't like it in high school. This book will most likely never become one of my favorite classics. Overall, "Alice in Wonderland" wasn't very effective to me.
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on January 14, 2001
I just read this book for an Honors English class, and I got exactly what I expected. Lewis Carroll has an unique writing style;it is unlike anything that I have read before. His use of words give a sharp image in the reader's head, just like as if they were actually there. He uses excellent imagery. His descriptions on every single character was great,and that was one thing that I enjoyed. An example of his descriptions is in the beginning of chapter six, when Alice sees a footman in front of a house. Carroll describes the footman "with a found face,and large eyes like a frog". He is one of the few authors that take the time to describe the supplementary characters. The main character is , of course, Alice. She is very adventurous, and this is seen throughout the book. Anyting that she sees that is new, she will try it. In the very beginning of her adventures, she sees a potion that is laying around, and in hopes of getting into the garden that she saw earlier, she drank some of it, just because it said "drink me". The potion made her very small, which eventually became an adventure within itself. Another example was when she went to play croquet with the queen. They played croquet with hedgehogs as balls and flamingoes has sticks. Alice didn't care what the adventure was, as long as she was a part of it.She also didn't hesistate to express her opinions. When the queen was executing everyone in her path, Alice spoke up about what she was doing. People who like adventuruous characters would like Alice. The theme of this book to me is if you see something new, you should try it just for the fun of doing something new. It is shown by Alice's different adventures, like what I mentioned in the previous paragraphs. I didn't really get the plot of this story. I thought that it was to get to the garden that she saw in the beginning of the book. I think that I didn't get it because Carroll jumped from one adventure without finishing the previous one. That is one of the reasons why I gave this book three stars out of five. I didn't like this story, partially because it was fantasy. I just read it to try something different.I would recommend this book to readers who like reading fantasy and who like to use their imaginations while reading. I don't know why it is a big children's classic, but I didn't like when I was in elementary school and I still don't like it in high school. This book will most likely never become one of my favorite classics. Overall, "Alice in Wonderland" wasn't very effective to me.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 31, 2002
Kept me occupied on the day when school let out early (Jan. 31) and I lost touch with all of the world while I was reading it! I think the part with Tweedledee and Tweedledum was cute! There are several poems in here they're so good that I'm trying to memorize them, like I am the dictionary! (don't knock it till you try it.)
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Though this book is not much better than Alice's Adventures, the chess motif and theme does make the book much more interesting. With the bossy, dominant Red Queen and the quiet, kind, messy white queen, the book is a study in contrasts.

The interweaving of the Nursery Rhyme Characters and the frequent fish poetry references does provide more continuity and a sense of sequential events than Alice's first adventure. I also appreciated the linking of the cat at the beginning and end of the story.

It does still feel like Carroll did way too many opium pipes in his time.

(First written as Journal Reading Notes in 1999.)
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on January 24, 2002
The book ''Alice in Wonderland Through The Looking Glass'' was an interesting book. I liked the book because it had neat words to learn and also the pictures were very well in illustration. My favorite part in the book was when she met the catipillar. That was my favorite part because he was so calm the way that the author wrote, and he also described the catipillar's actions very well. The ending was nice because it was just good to know she got what she wanted. This book is good and confusing but it is worth while.
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on May 31, 2001
It is somewhat hard to relate to the characters as they are from vintage turn-of-the-century English society and I am not. There are many things in the book that don't seem to make sense unless you look at the characters and situations from that perspective. The best aspects of this book are the creative characters and settings; make sure if you buy a copy of this book you get one with the original illustrations. I recommend this book to pretty much everyone; although it is somewhat dated and strange, you should enjoy it.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on June 27, 2003
You're right: I have no one to blame but myself. (Fool me twice, shame on me.) I'd read another book annotated by Gardner before, so I knew something about what his notes were like. Still, I thought, who better to explicate the puns, colloquialisms, and mathematical, logical, and philosophical references in _Alice_ than one of the great polymaths of our time, a connoisseur of puzzles, and an aficionado of Victorian literature? Plus, it's hard to deny that _The Definitive Edition_ is a handsome one.
Well, Gardner has really outdone himself this time. The notes go on and on and on, eclipsing the actual text in length. While Clavin might interrupt a conversation on the Bermuda Triangle to point out the little-known fact that it's really shaped like a tetrazidrhomboid, Gardner thinks that when a character uses an idiomatic expression involving ferrets it would be relevant to mention a get-together that ferret owners recently held in New York City's Central Park. Much of the inside information Gardner does provide is along the lines of telling us that this character is based on Alice Liddell's third cousin, once removed, or that that character is named after Dodgson's pet gerbil.
I think Gardner may have finally succeeded in turning me off of annotated editions for good.
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on March 20, 2000
This book is good and exciting but some of it is not like the animated movie. My favorite part is when she is with the Queen of Hearts and playing the game.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on April 12, 2003
Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking glass are two interesting stories. When I was a child, I watched the Disney version of Alice in Wonderland and enjoyed it. I've watched it again recently and find it very strange. I came across the book, "Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass" in an old library at my Grandparent's house. This was an old English version, which may have made it more difficult to read and comprehend then if it was in common dialect. The first story, Alice in Wonderland, is the better of the two. It tells of a dreamland that a seven-year old Alice is visiting. This book jumps around a lot, and it is difficult to keep track of who's who by the end. The second story, "Through the Looking Glass", was worse then the first one. It is once again in a dreamland of a world seen backwards from Alice's own world in the reflection of a mirror. When Alice enters this world, there are about two chapters before they enter the difficult analagy of telling the story through a game of chess. This is extremely hard to follow, seeing as you have to visualize the chessboard in your mind. Each seperate story takes place on a different tile while Alice is a pawn waiting to be Queened. In the end of the story, she is Queened and has tea with the other two queens, that is, the white and red queens. The dissapointing conclusion was that Alice was really in her world the whole time and her kittens were the queens in the story. I found both stories a challenging read, and was relieved when the book was finally over!
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