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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Watch out, NY!
The much-celebrated novel is a fairly unique one in the landscape of literature. Its 700+ pages and style are, as explicitly stated by Wolfe in the intro, an attempt to return to the grander realism works of the past. He specifically mentions Anna Karenina as the great example of the novel that portrays a cross section of a whole society. Only this is rarely done today,...
Published on July 2 2004 by Frikle

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3.0 out of 5 stars The Bonfire of Wolfe's Imagination
Yes, the plot drives itself.
Yes, the chracterizations are often vivid, entertaining, and thought-provoking.
Yes, the style and is agreeable and never too inconsistent with any given character at hand.
Yes, Wolfe shows and conveys his knowldge of the socio-economic stratums of America in book form. His insights into the relations between these groups and...
Published on June 11 2004 by Philip


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Watch out, NY!, July 2 2004
This review is from: The Bonfire of the Vanities (Paperback)
The much-celebrated novel is a fairly unique one in the landscape of literature. Its 700+ pages and style are, as explicitly stated by Wolfe in the intro, an attempt to return to the grander realism works of the past. He specifically mentions Anna Karenina as the great example of the novel that portrays a cross section of a whole society. Only this is rarely done today, so what we have is one of the only major cross-sections of New York in the 80's.
However, this is a cross-section that is viciously sliced from the meaty flesh of New York society, leaving it gaping, bleeding and exposed, all in a highly satirical and humorous way.
The main story revolves around a high-powered broker and his mistress who are involved in a hit-and-run accident which leaves a young, black "youth" from the Bronx in a coma. The scandal sweeps the city as an epitomy of the racial, economic and cultural differences (and inequalities), as a mob builds up around the case. In terms of the actual plot, there's nothing complicated, rather, its the eye into the eschelons of high, middle and poor society New-York-style that makes this entertaining and enjoyable.
Wolfe exposes the massive slab of hypocrisy present in the society, from the DA who has idealistic tirades about his job (when it's really a vehicle for his extra-marital and political ambitions) to the British journalist who thumbs his nose down on all things American (while scurrying for his next free meal and alcoholic binge).
As mentioned by many reviewers, there's nothing essentially new in the book - as Wolfe said, some of it feels like it's been ripped from the headlines, but in reality much of it is art imitating life. What I liked about the book is its message of vanity and indulgence, and how quickly those superficial bubbles can be burst in a crisis to *make* a person "ordinary" again. True to an almost century-old tradition in books, there are no real heroes here. But still, despite all the horrible things the main character has done, I found myself feeling sorry for him and somewhat admiring him by the end.
Other complaints have been the superficial role of women in the book, but again, I think that's simply an extension of the superficiality of a section of society that spends more on a painting frame than a cop earns in 6 months.
Overall, a great book that speaks without being preachy and has a lot of very funny moments.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant Satire That Nails The 80's Down Flat!!!, June 17 2004
By 
Robert J. Schneider (Tacoma, WA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Bonfire of the Vanities (Paperback)
I cannot believe that it has actually been over a decade since I read Tom Wolfe's THE BONFIRE OF THE VANITIES; it is a brilliant and hilarious entertaining work of satirical fiction, and a dead-on accurate social commentary of everything that made up the 1980's, commonly (and accurately) known as The Greed Decade. This includes the incendiary racial conflagrations that had been simmering throughout the 1970's that finally began to unravel during the 80's, aided and abetted by an increasingly sensationalist media that practiced underhanded "divide and conquer" tactics in order to keep the middle and working classes down by improperly (and sneakily) shifting the discussion from class to race.
Wolfe captures all that here, albeit in a lighter tone, by following four separate tracks concurrently, and how they all come together: Financially successful but amoral and philandering nouveau-riche bond trader Sherman McCoy, professional successful but financially wanting assistant prosecutor Lawrence Kramer, professionally unsuccessful and perpetually inebriated British-born tabloid 'journalist' Peter Fallow, and socially powerful (but under-respected) self-proclaimed African-American leader Reverend Reginald Bacon. The bonfire that their vanities create is fascinating; but what is best about this book is the insightful and real-to-life humor/social commentary that Wolfe weaves into the story throughout. If you're a relatively young reader who was born in the 80's and thusly do not remember it the way that, let's say, those of us born in 1967 do, then the reading of this book is absolutely essential to understanding all the different dysfunctional facets that made the 1980's the way it was.
Do not be put off by the story's length (705 pages); it is so enjoyable and is such a compulsive page-turner that it is likely that it will only take you a week or less to get through it all. Pick this one up and treat yourself to the hilarious world of THE BONFIRE OF THE VANITIES---and if you must, rent the 1990 Brian De Palma-directed misfire and see just how totally inept Hollywood was in capturing this world. THE BONFIRE OF THE VANITIES has earned its proper place one of the greatest---and most important---works of fiction in the 20th Century.
MOST RECOMMENDED; AGES 17 & UP
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4.0 out of 5 stars All fired up and no place to go, Feb. 10 2005
This review is from: The Bonfire of the Vanities (Paperback)
It's not often that you could say that a book changed your life, but Tom Wolfe's BONFIRE OF THE VANITIES did just that for me. No, it's not life changing in the way that McCrae's BARK OF THE DOGWOOD is, with its glorious food for thought, hysterical passages, and extreme messages, but it did make me think on an entirely new level. I was a college drop-out doing nothing with my life and one day my sister gave me this book. I'm not a big reader but I could not put this book down. I became completely involved with the great characters in this book, young attorney, Larry Kramer, writer Peter Fallow, Reverand Reginald Bacon, and of course, Sherman McCoy. Wolfe wrote in such terrific detail that you feel as if you'd known these characters all your life. I started talking about them in conversations like they were close friends of mine. The story itself is incredible, taking you through the highs and lows of four main characters with Sherman being the tie that binds them all. Now, as for the life-changing part, I knew very little about the stock market, but after seeing the high-life that Sherman led, the luxury car, the Park Ave. Co-Op, and of course his lovely ladies, wife Judy and mistress, Maria Ruskin, I knew thats what I wanted for myself(except for the mistress, of course). So, I took a couple of classes, read a few books and I passed my stockbroker exam on the first try. Wall Street has been great to me--I have a job I love, great friends and surroundings and I met my wife at my firm. In short, I have never been happier and I have Tom Wolfe and his tale of a wealthy financier to thank. Must also recommend the DOGWOOD book by McCrae and another called A MAN IN FULL by the author of BONFIRE.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A true "social" novel, June 13 2004
At some point in the 1980s, Tom Wolfe published an article in Harper's magazine promulgating the death of the social novel. The article caused a little stir among the literati, and sent legions of younger authors into cigarette-stimulated frenzies, hurriedly working on churning out the next great American "social" novel; like a fresh Americanized Dickens for the impending turn of the century. Well, it turns out Wolfe himself was doing the exact same thing, and it makes one wonder if the portending article was nothing more than an early plug for his novel-of-the-decade-to-define-the-decade.
"Bonfire of the Vanities" is most certainly a smart and transcending novel, completely cognizant of the politics of an era defined by greed and lack of sympathy. Reading it now as we bulldoze on past the millenium mark, it seems just as appropriate and necessary as ever before. Wolfe really has created a masterpiece here, with all the types of characters one would expect from late 1980s New York: the smug stockbroker; the weaselish journalist; the fawning assistant D.A. All these people are arrayed amid a boiling cauldron of vanity which exudes the societal malfunction of the era.
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3.0 out of 5 stars The Bonfire of Wolfe's Imagination, June 11 2004
By 
Philip (New York City) - See all my reviews
Yes, the plot drives itself.
Yes, the chracterizations are often vivid, entertaining, and thought-provoking.
Yes, the style and is agreeable and never too inconsistent with any given character at hand.
Yes, Wolfe shows and conveys his knowldge of the socio-economic stratums of America in book form. His insights into the relations between these groups and within them is noteworthy. He's well-travelled.
But, the novel is essentially nihilistic - yes, grandly and lavaciously nihilistic, but nonetheless nihilistic.
It is also too long. The writing helps justify the length, but the plot, the wonderfully simple plot does not!
And I'm not one for "gender studies" but the depiction of women in this novel is weak, marginal, and miserable.
I don't feel as if I wasted my time reading Bonfire( I skipped over the depressing last fity pages) but I feel Mr. Wolfe might have wasted some of his talent.
And what of the loose ends of seemingly important side-plots. It smacks of the dissappointment, I felt after reading his "A Man in Full." So much story, so little ending.
It's well worth the read, and is a modern classic, but some classics have flaws (like the times in which they are based) and they bring down this novel.
It at least brought me a little down.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Impressively Accurate and Gripping, May 13 2004
By 
"bkummer4" (Philadelphia, PA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Bonfire of the Vanities (Paperback)
I can understand how this book was such a milestone. True genius, in the journalistic style--for portraying so well the status and money-obsessed nature of New York, which still holds true today. Wolfe does a terrific, and I mean really terrific, job at describing the city's political climate and how easily people can be taken advantage of once power and money are thrown into the mix.
Each character's intense need to better his or her own situation is at the center of how each of them relate to the story. In that, the story is essentially a description of how five New Yorkers cross paths and manage to further and better their personal situations, at the expense of a rich Wall Street trader's criminal mistake and inward feelings of guilt. Even though Sherman McCoy's character is portrayed as your typical snooty financial industry professional, the way in which he is brought down is dismaying in itself. He is used as a scapegoat for the ills of the White Establishment by a crooked, black political figure (using the hypocrisy of the church to better himself); used as "the Great White Defendant" by an insecure, self-critical assistant DA to make his career as a trial lawyer; used as centerpiece of a tabloid story to build a shallow, alcoholic reporter's journalist career; used to displace blame by a promiscuous, sleek money-hungry trophy wife... The Bonfire shows the lengths people will go to in order to get ahead and the lack of underlying trust for others, irregardless of money and status. The book is a lesson in city life, opportunism, greed, and a fundamental lesson in our very nature and how we operate, in the strict, economic sense of the term.
In another vein, the plot takes some movie-like twists and turns that dont necessarily work well in writing. Overall, an amazing piece of work, but seems very well suited to the screen more than anything else...I still have to rent the movie!!! Overall, a gripping and very accurate rendition of the city lives we all dream of living.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Powerful and Potent, Nov. 30 2003
By 
therosen "therosen" (New York, NY United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Bonfire of the Vanities (Paperback)
On the surface, the book is a satire of the puffed up 80s. The "Vanities" that are being blown up are all the pretensions that people put around themselves. Sherman McCoy is a man who would've exuded strength and power in a prior age. But is he a "Master of the Universe" bond trader (a term coined by Tom Wolfe, later to make it into the popular lexicon) or just another fluffed up product of society? Indeed, the book explores this question. You'll be surprised by the answer!
Is it just a novel of the 80s? I disagree, for several reasons...
- The greed of the 80s reappeared in the past 5 years.
- If you look hard enough, one of the characters in the book is running for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2004.
- The deep characters Wolfe creates ring true today.
- New York again sees itself in a time of great change. Maybe there are lessons in this literature?
Is it the Great American Novel? Who knows... But it can be read with "A Man in Full" to understand grit, determination and what does make America different.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Still the perfect parody of New York City., Nov. 5 2003
By 
This review is from: The Bonfire of the Vanities (Paperback)
Tom Wolfe's "Bonfire of the Vanities" was first published in 1987, but 16 years later it is still the best parody of the political and social scene in New York City. Combining his everyday, "fly-over country"-style conservatism with his keen wit, Wolfe lays out a story that sends characters crashing into one another from all socioeconomic levels across the Big Apple.
Sherman McCoy, a stereotypical, ego-maniacal bond-trader, is Wolfe's typical protagonist. The main plot starts when McCoy and his mistress, Maria Ruskin, take a wrong turn returning from Kennedy airport one night, leaving them lost in a bad neighborhood in the Bronx. This is where they cross paths with Henry Lamb, a seemingly innocent kid stuck in a sad world, and Roland Auburn, a neighbor of Lamb's and local drug-dealing hoodlum. In their haste to escape from a neigborhood within their city but light years from anything they recognize, Sherman and Maria strike Lamb with their car, critically injuring him. Once a struggling NYC journalist learns of the story, it becomes a perfect case for the politicians, media, and attorneys to latch on to for their own selfish gain. From there the Lamb case blows up into an ordeal beyond anyone's control, but one that could only descend into such madness in New York.
Wolfe's writing is funny, entertaining, and searing. Through his fictional characters, he presents the perfect condemnation of the ridiculous excesses found in some NYC political and social circles, with specific real-life examples coming naturally to any reader's mind.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Searching for cell phones and laptops..., Oct. 12 2003
This review is from: The Bonfire of the Vanities (Paperback)
Perhaps the thing that struck me most about this novel was the fact that even if it was a "period" piece of the 1980s, it was shockingly similar to the society of the turn of the 21st century, right before the tech-bubble burst. In 20 years, it amazes me how much--and at the same time how *little*--has really changed. One might almost expect Sherman McCoy to pull out a miniaturized cell phone to bid on some shares of Enron rather than the Giscard bonds he was involved with. I felt, reading this book for the first time in the 21st century, that it might as well be the society of today under Mr. Wolfe's satirical scrutiny.
The racially, politically charged media circus surrounding his arrest is perhaps now an even more familiar phenomenon than it would have been in the 1980s--something to which we as a society are becoming increasingly numb to. As the situation grows, and spirals further out of control, Mr. Wolfe makes it increasingly harder on the reader to land squarely on one side or another--on one hand we have the unjust death of a promising Bronx student, and on the other, we have the case being used by various people trying to further their public careers. One even begins to feel sympathy for the calculating, womanizing Sherman McCoy as his perfectly ordered life comes completely unraveled. And then we as readers become repulsed by such feelings--which is truly the "right" feeling in a situation like this? There is no black or white here (yes, that remark is meant on many levels)--only a confusing, boundless field of grey. And that seems to be at the core of Mr. Wolfe's purpose in writing this...it is an unflinching look at a society that seems to verge upon the completely amoral.
With regards to its "unflinching" nature, some readers may at first be put off by the extreme bluntness with which Mr. Wolfe tells his story. Epithets and "outdated" social and cultural attitudes abound, and Mr. Wolfe doesn't shy away from the harshest, ugliest possible terms for them. And this very bluntness is perhaps what makes The Bonfire of the Vanities so compelling to me as a reader. We live in a society that has smothered itself by political correctness--a society where despite seeming openness, the lines of communication are really quite tightly controlled by that strange convention. To see the veneer of civilization completely ripped away from the society of the 1980s (and, one might imagine, from the very society in which we live now) is at once a repulsive and refreshing experience-- this is perhaps one of the best modern novels I have ever read, fully deserving of its 5 stars.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An irrepressible moral vacuum, Oct. 4 2003
By 
Chris Salzer (Gainesville, GA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Bonfire of the Vanities (Paperback)
Is Bonfire of the Vanities a period piece? When reading a book from a previous time period, one might begin to ponder that very legitimate concern? It is, but it isn't. Allow me to elucidate. Bonfire garners irrepressible staying power as a scathing, sardonic, and witty treatise exposing the greed, glamour, decadence, and moral decay of the 80's not unlike The Roaring 20's of Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. By no means is Bonfire in the same boat as Gatsby, but nonetheless, it's in the same ballpark, if you will.
Having never read Tom Wolfe before, I must say that I came away quite impressed and entertained by his singular ability to instantaneously transfer from one character's perspective to another at the drop of a dime(e.g. going from Reverend Bacon in the decrepit racially-charged milieu of The Bronx to Sherman McCoy in the plush comfortable confines of Park Avenue). Wolfe's merciless satire and scathing cynicism lends itself to all of his eccentrically diverse motley cadre of characters. As a testament to Wolfe's eclectic acumen, the author definitively nails the veritable cornucopia of targets ranging the gamut from the sheltered luxury apartments, entre nous lavish fetes of the social elite X-Rays of Park Avenue, the high-pressure environment of Sherman's Wall Street, the dog eat dog baseness of Vogel & co. at The Bronx PD and jail, the unmitigated political pandering of Weiss and Kramer at the DA's office, the Machiavellian glibness of Peter Fallow of The City Light, and, last but definitely not least, the self-serving specious "racial activism" of Reverend Bacon.
The vastly paradoxical upshot of it all is this my friends: Although this extraordinarily divergent melange of characters exists in strikingly unique socioeconomic environments, they all, however, undoubtedly contribute to the prodigious confluence of flagrant self-absorbtion, blatant egotism, deplorable moral degradation, pernicious greed, and the despicable venality that cryptically ties all of them together into one infinitely vacuous morally depraved vacuum categorically devoid of any semblance of moral absolutes. Ahh...the irony of it all! Wolfe's ingenious penchant for piquant characterization and witty dialogue makes for a smooth and fluid read that entertains as well as educates. Bonfire IS a period piece, but it remains just as provocative today as it was upon its release. Period(pardon the pun).
"A liberal is a conservative who has been arrested."
- Sherman McCoy
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