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5.0 out of 5 stars Good book
I have read all of the books in this series and enjoy them all. If you are interested in early history, I recommend it.
Published 12 months ago by Donna Jean Jones

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Frustrating
The frustration I have with this book (and also with the fifth book in the series) is that, after reading the Clan of the Cave Bear, I know the talent of which this author is capable. We do not, unfortunately, see much of that talent in this book.
Readers do not appreciate being treated as though they lack intelligence, and the extreme repetition found in this book...
Published on Jan. 13 2003 by Susan M. Schreiber


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Frustrating, Jan. 13 2003
By 
Susan M. Schreiber (Sammamish, Washington United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Plains of Passage: Earth's Children, Book Four (Mass Market Paperback)
The frustration I have with this book (and also with the fifth book in the series) is that, after reading the Clan of the Cave Bear, I know the talent of which this author is capable. We do not, unfortunately, see much of that talent in this book.
Readers do not appreciate being treated as though they lack intelligence, and the extreme repetition found in this book (and in the fifth book) sends the reader the message that she is just too stupid to remember what went on before.
So much of the book became tedious and boring. Even the [love] scenes were repetitive. You could sum it all up by saying that Jondalar is quite a lover. Jondalar has a really big .... manhood. Ayla is as vunerable as a virgin, yet deep enough to take in all of Jondalar, which Jondalar really digs.
Readers feel cheated because the first book was so very, very good. But now it seems that all we are getting for our loyalty and anticipation is a lazy, repetitive effort.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Good book, April 3 2013
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This review is from: The Plains of Passage: Earth's Children, Book Four (Mass Market Paperback)
I have read all of the books in this series and enjoy them all. If you are interested in early history, I recommend it.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Again this was a book I didn;t want to put down...!, March 17 2004
By 
This review is from: The Plains of Passage: Earth's Children, Book Four (Mass Market Paperback)
The Plains of Passage was nothing short of amazing. All of Auel's books have left me with wanting for the next one. This one even though had more than enough details and descriptions was still good. I agree that I think this one had a little too much scenary but considering the trek across Europe emphasizing the geological differences was important and just proved that once again her research was taken not lightly. (But I still think there was just a little more than needed) Also the tribe of man-hating women seemed a lttle farfetched. After a little more thought I could see it happening possibly. Even though it is hard to believe people then had the same emotions as we do now, they are still people and I would think there emotions were similar. My daughter was spawned from an abusive relationship that ended through a more aggressive assult on me sexually. I know I hated men and would see them all dead for all I cared. A year later and I still have a problem trusting men, and from what the headwoman's history was it is a more believable story. Plus, considering the type of mad men we have loose on our streets today how could it be so hard to believe that it wasn't the same then. But then I though how could all the other women of the tribe not stand up to their chief and then I thought of Hitler. So overall this book was just another one of Auel's masterpeices.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THE BEST, Feb. 14 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: The Plains of Passage: Earth's Children, Book Four (Mass Market Paperback)
In the 4th part of this amazing story about unusual Ayla, you"ll find yourself always interested- this is just amazing.
Adventures- there are quite a lot, and it's the best of them all
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Too much detail, June 16 2003
By A Customer
I have read all the books in this series, and one thing I've noticed is that each subsequent volume is more superflous than the last in terms of detail. Auel does a great job in the first two books of describing the plantlife, people, and both physical and emotional feelings of each character. Unfortunately, she continues her series with more and more detailed explanations, even of things she's described before. I was curious how many times she felt I needed to be reminded what a "mother statuette" looked like. Once that has been described in a book, it should not be described again unless there are significant differences. Anyway, I love the story and would rate this book at 5 stars easily if only it weren't so long winded.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Great Goddess, Feb. 2 2003
By 
Mitch R. Confesor (Davao City, Philippines) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Plains of Passage: Earth's Children, Book Four (Mass Market Paperback)
The Great Goddess
SOME people have gone gaga over the witches and warlocks of J.K. Rowling's seven-part Harry Potter mania. And some have equally gone crazy over the elves and hobbits of the non-existent "existentialist" Middle Earth in J.R.R. Tolkien's three-part Lord of the Rings fad. But dear, I choose to be neither, as I would rather go for the real-life Homo sapiens and extinct Neanderthals in the long forgotten world of Jean Auel's six-part Earth's Children classic.
As it is, Earth's Children is realist, justifiable, worldly, down-to-earth. For earthy reasons, I will tell you why. So here's why ... .
From the eye-opening Clan of the Cave Bear to the serene Valley of Horses, from the thought-provoking Mammoth Hunters to the uplifting Plains of Passage, readers are immersed into the world of a young girl as she is transformed into a teenage mother and high-spirited woman -- her heart, her mind, her values, her fears, her triumphs. Losing her family after an earthquake, blond-haired and bluish-gray-eyed Ayla is raised by creatures of the land far different from her. They call themselves the Clan, but the white men call them "flatheads" -- or worse, "animals."
In the Earth's Children series, Ayla is more than just a three-dimensional heroine as we sense her every struggle and will to live and survive in a cruel world peopled with crueler humans, mostly people of her own kind, whom the Neanderthals call "the Others."
Skillfully, author Jean Auel has molded Ayla into a four-(or even five-)dimensional character we can see, hear, smell, feel -- and even taste! The people whom Ayla has inspired and whose lives she touched along the way are all inclined to believe that she is the Mother of the Earth herself. But come to think of it, Jean Auel herself -- the Omniscient Writer and Researcher, the Pleistocene Pre-historian and Chronicler -- could just be the Great Earth Mother of the last 25,000 years.
This is no Middle Earth or Hogwarts fake. Neanderthal bones found at the Shanidar Cave north of Turkey are evidence enough that Auel's "flatheads" did exist. They're not orcs or hobbits, much less elves or witches. They may not be anatomically modern men but they are intelligent breathing beings who make tools and gaze on stars and, perhaps, communicate through sign language.
Jean Auel has humanized and personified what could have been an abstract or even boring topic in history -- or pre-history, for that matter. Like the fire in a subterranean hearth, Auel has warmed up what could have been an aloof and cold topic as the Ice Age and the glacial epoch. Tell me. Who would be bored at the sight of big ice walls and white snow fields, or red loess soil and dry arid plains? Who would be bored at the sound of woolly mammoths and giant cave lions, at the odor of vicious hyenas and gigantic cave bears, at the touch of domesticated horses and docile wolves -- at the flavor of warm human contact and affection amidst the fury of the Pleistocene Era?
Who would not be mesmerized at the crystal clear waters of the rampaging Great Mother River (the present-day Danube), which runs all the way to the Beran Sea (the modern-day Black Sea) in the early days of the vast European continent? Who would not savor the taste of fresh caviar, the eggs from the bosom of 10-foot-long beluga sturgeons which were once abundant and now extremely scarce for being the most expensive and sought-after food in the entire universe?
The only thing missing in Earth's Children is the saber-toothed tiger, although there was a brief mention of this dirk-toothed feline. And if Michael Crichton's dinosaurs in Jurassic Park and Lost World were comical enough in the film versions, wait until right-minded people in Hollywood breathe life into the chase for fantastic bisons and huge mammoths, into the hunt for white arctic foxes and pesky little wolverines.
As a skillful and classy craftswoman in her own genre, Auel has perfected a work of art as fine as the blade of an expert Zelandonii toolmaker and flint knapper, as sheer as the chiseled tusks of a master Mamutoi ivory carver. In fact, the entire Earth's Children series are more than just a "survival manual" and an "environmentalist's handbook," as some critics view them. Any book in the series would be worthy anytime of a shelf space just beside the Holy Bible, considered as the greatest work of all time.
As for Auel, well, She's just heaven-sent. A great Goddess.
MITCH R. CONFESOR
Associate Editor
Mindanao TIMES
Davao City, Philippines
CANDLEBOX column
February 3, 2003
"Children of the Earth"
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4.0 out of 5 stars A 14 year old girls review., April 9 2004
This review is from: The Plains of Passage: Earth's Children, Book Four (Mass Market Paperback)
I am fourteen, and for a fourteen year old I am an avid reader. Jean's 4th book made me see what reading could do. This book took me inside the minds of Ayla and Jondalar to experience their own personal feelings. This book is set 25,000 years ago when a easily lit fire was a god send. Ayla and Jondalar trek across marshland and glaciers to find a place were they can both call home. This is a truely magnificent book which should be given the praise it deserves. All Jean M Auel books are superb and should be read by all.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Plains of Passage, Oct. 27 2003
By 
"deputy2754" (Spring Valley, WI) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Plains of Passage: Earth's Children, Book Four (Mass Market Paperback)
I enjoyed this book, but not quite as well as the 3 previous. It was a little too detailed at times, and tended to drag on a little. The story however, was wonderful, just like the other three. I am reading the Shelters of Stone at this time, and although "The Plains..." was a little more difficult to get through, it was a necessity and laid the ground work for the fifth book in the series. I would recommend it to everyone, and just hang in there during the monotonous parts. You'll be glad you did
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5.0 out of 5 stars maybe the best in the series, Oct. 3 2003
By 
Jeffrey Roberts (Long Island, New York United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Plains of Passage: Earth's Children, Book Four (Mass Market Paperback)
i know it is hard to beat the first clan of the cave bear, but i really liked this one. i did not like the 3rd and am anxious to read the 5th.
read them in order and continue, this one is very good.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as the others, March 31 2003
By 
"shellf99" (Connecticut USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Plains of Passage (Hardcover)
I have absolutely fallen in love with the Earth's Children books. Jean Auel is a masterful story teller. She clearly has done a tremendous amount of research for these books, which adds to the enjoyment. Not only are we getting a fascinating story, but we a learning about man's evolving culture, nature, old world geography, natural healing and many other wonderful things. However, "Plains of Passage" was not quite as good as the first three books. The story line in this book seemed to be a bit repetitive. I also found myself skipping over large parts of the books because too much time was spent on describing the landscape or lifestyles of the animals around at that time. This book could easily have been half as long as it is. I have already started on "Shelters of Stone", which so far seems to show much promise of making up for the less exciting "Plains of Passage".
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The Plains of Passage: Earth's Children, Book Four
The Plains of Passage: Earth's Children, Book Four by Jean M. Auel (Mass Market Paperback - Oct. 1 1991)
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