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5.0 out of 5 stars Pinnacle of Asimov's robot storytelling
The robot novels were always my favorite of Asimov's work. This book was written by the science-fiction master well into his career, demonstrating a significant improvement in his powers. This builds on the characters introduced in Caves of Steel and Naked Sun. You should read those before venturing into this novel.
Asimov combines the mystery genre and many of his...
Published on May 10 2004 by jradoff

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Did not finish due to frustrating beginning
This book was gifted to me a while back and started reading it expectantly since Asimov has such a reputation. It was very slow going. The scientific way in which he rights (I suppose it is science fiction) is intrigueing but becomes very annoying when it stops the story from progressing. I got through about a third of it but when I got to the part where the main...
Published on Dec 27 2003 by gabe


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4.0 out of 5 stars Daneel for President, June 2 2004
By 
J. C. Mayor "bigtimereader" (Monroe, NC United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Robots of Dawn (Mass Market Paperback)
Although I think there are better science fiction writers than Asimov, somehow his ability to pull one into a book always succeeds. This was one of my favorite of the gazillion Empire, Robot, and Foundation books that were all tied together (rather oddly, since they were written completely separately, but with fun twists) by Asimov toward the end of his life.
If you are an Asimov fan or a fan of respectable writing, this book, plus the other robot novels, will please you.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Pinnacle of Asimov's robot storytelling, May 10 2004
This review is from: The Robots of Dawn (Mass Market Paperback)
The robot novels were always my favorite of Asimov's work. This book was written by the science-fiction master well into his career, demonstrating a significant improvement in his powers. This builds on the characters introduced in Caves of Steel and Naked Sun. You should read those before venturing into this novel.
Asimov combines the mystery genre and many of his futurist ideas together in this series. Not only do you get to experience a great mystery-adventure, but you're also exploring the social consequences of near-human robots. Daneel Olivaw, the robot partner to detective Elijah Baley, is one of the most memorable characters in the field of speculative fiction.
This is the best place to start reading Asimov. The sequel, Robots and Empire, is excellent as well. After reading the Robots books, try the Foundation series, which starts slower but gets very good--and ultimately rewards readers of the Robot books by tieing it all together.
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5.0 out of 5 stars science fiction detective mystery continues [no spoilers], Feb. 13 2004
This review is from: The Robots of Dawn (Mass Market Paperback)
"The Robots of Dawn" is the third fascinating novel in the awesome science fiction series involving Elijah Baley and R. Daneel Olivaw. The gifted roboticist Han Fastolfe asks the agoraphobic (afraid of open places) plainclothes cop Elijah Baley, since he solved previous mysteries, to unravel a crime committed on Aurora. The offense entails the murder of one Jander Parnell and as Fastolfe is the most likely candidate to have caused the crime, he trusts only Elijah and Daneel, a technological masterpiece restricted in his behavior by the Laws of Robotics, to pursue the case. Although Elijah faced the open airs of Solaria, he will struggle with his phobia on Aurora while becoming accustomed to the robots of a different society. Another lovable robot enters the picture to associate with the dynamic duo in the crime solving process. The story is well written and kept me interested throughout with a gripping ending.
Thank you.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Did not finish due to frustrating beginning, Dec 27 2003
This review is from: The Robots of Dawn (Mass Market Paperback)
This book was gifted to me a while back and started reading it expectantly since Asimov has such a reputation. It was very slow going. The scientific way in which he rights (I suppose it is science fiction) is intrigueing but becomes very annoying when it stops the story from progressing. I got through about a third of it but when I got to the part where the main character was talking to the alien politicion accused of roboticide.
Now it has been a while and I am a little scetchy but let's see.
First of all The Alien spends about 10 pages not answering the guys questions. Then he answers them all in overload. The way in which Asimov bombards us with facts does nothing to clarify the situation. It's a bit like hearing a 1000 word essay on the uses of a pencil, yes you can probably get a plausable 1000 words but no I don't need to read it because it's boring and i'm not going to remember it all anyway. It got to the point where I was getting information (At this point I was getting info not story) which I had recieved 3 or so times in slightly different variations. I suspected that the rest of the book was going to be made up of lengthy dialogues between the main character and suspects.
I wanted to write a bad review about this book because it annoyed me. Perhaps I should try and be concise.
We need logic in life but it is not fun and it is not entertaining. Pure logic, when it is not mixed with anything else is boring.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Asimov done? Not quite yet..., Dec 15 2003
By 
Steven M. Balke Jr. (Ypsilanti, MI USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Robots of Dawn (Mass Market Paperback)
This is a great story on its own (though it wouldn't make much sense without the first three books), but where it really shines is in how it draws together so many loose ends. It is also amazing how Asimov set little events into place that don't end up playing out until Foundation and Earth--thousands of years and dozens of books later. Asimov is just warming up with the climax of the robot series!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful science fiction classic, Oct. 23 2003
This review is from: The Robots of Dawn (Hardcover)
In "The Robots of Dawn," Asimov once again examines human nature through the devices of science fiction. The plot revolves around the "murder" of one of two humaniform robots in existence, which protagonist Elijah Baley is called to the Spacer home world Aurora to investigate. Asimov's characters and plot are deep, and his understanding of human nature is truly remarkable. This book is not only a very engaging work of science fiction and mystery, but also a shrewd exposition of the motives and prejudices of human beings. And yet Asimov manages to provoke in his readers a strong sense of hope for the future of humankind.
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4.0 out of 5 stars An essential link in Asimov's future history, May 19 2003
By 
Neal C. Reynolds (Indianapolis, Indiana) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Robots of Dawn (Mass Market Paperback)
This was written much later than the original two robot novels, the three Empire novels, and the Foundation trilogy. It and the following book, ROBOTS AND EMPIRE, link the first two robot books with the Empire series and leads up to Foundation.
There are a couple of points easy to miss here. First, psychohistory is first suggested by Dr. Fastolfe, and then advanced by the two robots. Secondly, while there is a mystery involved here, the emphasis is on the future of space exploration and who is going to be in it. The original pioneers into space have become spoiled by their reliance on their robots and no longer have the spirit of adventure necessary to continue further exploration, and yet they are fearful of the idea of generally despised Earth people colonizing planets.
So much indeed is at stake here. For full enjoyment, I suggest reading first the Susan Calvin stories and also "The Bicentennial Man" which are in Asimov's THE COMPLETE ROBOT, and then THE CAVES OF STEEL and THE NAKED SUN, the first two Elijah Bailey & R. Daneel Olivaw novels. And be prepared for this book to be more centered on mankind's future venturing into space than in the mystery element.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Roboticide and Robot Love., Jan. 12 2003
By 
Simon Laub (Aarhus, Denmark, Europe) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Robots of Dawn (Mass Market Paperback)
For those of us who enjoy taking a
peek of things to come, as we go down the
road of machine intelligence, Isaac Asimov
never disappoints.
In Robots of Dawn we are faced with the horrors
of a roboticide. The killing of a humaniform
robot. A robot who was loved by a human, and
who made love to a human.
It is all so simple and yet it is written so
prophetically right that it has all the hallmarks
of a genius. Isaac Asimov - once again.
Compelling.
-Simon
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4.0 out of 5 stars Great book, but i wish i could [eliminate] Fastolfe, Nov. 24 2002
By 
"kar_the_terrible" (Troy, NY United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Robots of Dawn (Mass Market Paperback)
I have at last read every book in the robots and foundation saga. I must say i admire Asimov for being able to keep the magic alive across so many novels. However, this novel implies that Giskard invented psychohistory and the only part us humans play is to be nudged along by this telepathic robot. Overall it is a good read, and continues the epic of Robots and the Empire for all us die-hard Asimov fans. The character of Han Fastolfe though really taxes my patience.
If you have read the first two books in this series, and are hungry for more... do go ahead and buy it!! ...
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Brighter Dawn, Nov. 8 2002
This review is from: The Robots of Dawn (Mass Market Paperback)
After reading this book I truly had more faith in mankind. I could not help to think that if Asimov could think like this there must be others that examined how we might interact with robots, aliens, or even people of different races, color, and so on. This book goes well beyond a great story about how robots impact the future of humans. It will make you think about many things as you are fascinated with how humans made a mess of things and robots behind the scenes rectified them at great sacrifice. A robot with a soul. A must read for anyone that enjoys any of Asimov's books or if you like Star Trek, Stargate SG-1, Babylon 5, or any other good TV series like that.
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The Robots of Dawn
The Robots of Dawn by Isaac Asimov (Mass Market Paperback - March 1 1994)
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