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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Timeless Classic
This collection of stories about the famed detective Sherlock Holmes and his faithful "sidekick" Watson is truly a timeless classic. It is filled with intrigue, mystery, romance, vengeance and ,ultimately, murder. Its beautifully constructed plot and the whole motive of the murder, the clues and the amazing deductive powers of Sherlock Holmes will hardly fail to entertain...
Published on Dec 31 2002

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars The Mysterious World of Sherlock Holmes
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes is a wonderful book for the open minded. It takes you on a journey through London's city streets, throught the houses of pesents and the safes of bank owners. You travel with Holmes on his many cases and travles. Holmes is yet again assisted by his trusty companion Dr. Watson, who has yet to figure out Holmes' mysterious ways of going...
Published on Dec 13 2000 by Benjamin Boyd


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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Timeless Classic, Dec 31 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Complete Sherlock Holmes: All 4 Novels and 56 Short Stories (Mass Market Paperback)
This collection of stories about the famed detective Sherlock Holmes and his faithful "sidekick" Watson is truly a timeless classic. It is filled with intrigue, mystery, romance, vengeance and ,ultimately, murder. Its beautifully constructed plot and the whole motive of the murder, the clues and the amazing deductive powers of Sherlock Holmes will hardly fail to entertain you and keep you craving for more. Not only will you find crime and punishment on these pages, but also the unique world (the 19th century England) and personalities (cold-blooded Holmes and always left behind Watson) which Doyle has created.
There is one downside to this marvellous classic. When you are done reading the book and there are no more adventures to consume you will feel nostalgic. One could only wish to relax in the comfort of an armchair in front of a fireplace while a rainstorm rages outside and Sherlock Holmes is patiently absorbing the details of another case, on No. 221B Baker Street
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "...one whom Virtue crowned...", March 25 2002
This review is from: Aeneid (Paperback)
[This review refers to the Dover Thrift verse
edition of the AENEID translated into English
by Charles J. Billson in 1906.]
As incredible as it may seem, I prefer this
Billson verse translation over that of Allen
Mandelbaum (which I also have in the Bantam
Classic edition, 1970). What causes one person
to like one translation, and another to prefer
someone else's? It is a matter of taste, but
also of conditioning through aesthetic experience
and expectation. I have read a great many poems
in a great many forms. To my sense and sensibility
there is something about the Mandelbaum translation
of the AENEID which is too confining...too clipped...
it does not seem, to me, to flow freely. And yet
Billson's translation has archaic word choices --
but the flow of his translation seems more interesting
and "freer" than that of Mandelbaum.
Here is a sample of Mandelbaum:
I sing of arms and of a man: his fate
had made him fugitive; he was the first
to journey from the coasts of Troy as far
as Italy and the Lavinian shores.
Across the lands and waters he was battered
beneath the violence of High Ones, for
the savage Juno's unforgetting anger;
and many sufferings were his in war --
[Bantam Classic, 1970.]
And here is Billson in the Dover edition with
the same passage:
Arms and the Man I sing, who first from Troy
A Doom-led exile, on Lavinian shores
Reached Italy; long tossed on sea and land
By Heaven's rude arm, through Juno's brooding
ire,
And war-worn long ere building for his Gods
A Home in Latium: whence [came] the Latin race,
The Lords of Alba, and high-towering Rome.

To my senses, and sensibility, there is something
about Billson's language and flow which seems to
have more august grandeur -- epic style, sound, and
sweep.
Here is an even more telling example -- the famous
scene in which Aeneas plucks the Golden Bough:
[Mandelbaum:] ...just so
the gold leaves seemed against the dark-green
ilex;
so in the gentle wind, the thin gold leaf
was crackling. And at once Aeneas plucks it
and, eager, breaks the hesitating bough
and carries it into the Sibyl's house.
[Billson:] So on that shadowy oak the leafy gold
Glimmered, and tinkled in the rustling air.
Forthwith Aeneas grasped the clinging bough,
And plucked, and bare it toward the Sibyl's
cell.

There seems to me a fineness of poetic sensitivity
there, in Billson, to choose those words just so --
and have the words almost resonate with the sounds
of the objects they are describing.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Story, Great Translation, Jan. 23 2004
This review is from: The Aeneid (Paperback)
The Aeneid is the least known of the classical triumvirate of the Iliad, Odyssey, and Aeneid. Some parts are boring, but overall it has a great story. It's basically How Aeneus fled Troy after it's fall to find New Troy, or more commonly known as a little city called Rome. Also, many have ignored the great battle scenes of books 6-12. This is really where the story of the Trojan horse comes from and the phrase "don't trust Greeks bearing gifts" (actually, it's really supposed to be: "Even when Greeks bring gifts, I fear them, gifts and all!") This is the best translation there is, Fitzgerald is a master.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars No Pictures!!!, June 23 2002
By 
Amazon Customer "gwone" (Southern New York State, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Complete Sherlock Holmes: All 4 Novels and 56 Short Stories (Mass Market Paperback)
I have only one beef with this edition of the book. NO PICTURES! If your funds are severely limited, then buy this edition only. It's complete and contains all the original stories. You can't go wrong buying this edition.
If you do have extra bucks to spare and you're a newbie to S.H., I'd highly recommend you first buy "The Original Illustrated Sherlock Holmes" by Castle Books, ISBN: 0-7858-1325-X. It contains all 356 original illustrations by Sidney Paget as they appeared in the Strand Magazine. These illustrations define the enduring image of Holmes and Watson as we have of them today. Even the popular PBS series by Jeremy Brett duplicates scenes from these illustrations. Unfortunately, Paget did not illustrate the first two novels of S.H. and died before he can illustrate the later adventures. But the illustrations will add much greater depth and enjoyment to these stories.
When you're finally done with the illustrated edition and you're still aching for more S.H., then get this complete edition to complete the adventures.
And if you're like me, being a British rebel (an American) and having no real knowledge and experience of what life in Victorian England was about, an entertaining reference book is "The Bedside, Bathtub and Armchair Companion to Sherlock Holmes" by Riley and McAllister, ISBN: 0-8264-1116-9.
This book can be read alongside your reading of each story of S.H. It gives a capsule summary of each adventure and lists some oddities and descrepancies to each story without giving away the ending. Also, it contains chapters which explains the life and times of Holmes' era and explains such things as monetary equivelents, etc. For someone like me who doesn't know a crown from a farthing to a sovereign, it clears up many areas of cultural difference and ignorance. This greatly enhances my enjoyment and understanding of these stories.
The only reason I gave this book 4 stars was because I couldn't give it 4.5 stars. I just couldn't give it 5 stars because of the missing illustrations. A book which advertises that it's the "complete" S.H. should be complete and include the illustrations as they appeared in the Strand Magazine as originally published.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The King of Classic Mystery, Jan. 3 2002
By 
C. Maynard (Saline, MI United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Complete Sherlock Holmes: All 4 Novels and 56 Short Stories (Mass Market Paperback)
Reading Sherlock Holmes is like consuming a huge box of chocolates. You want to eat them all at once because they are so wonderful, yet you don't want to finish the box because there are no more after that. What a decision! Well...eat the whole box, wait a year and read them all again!
We need more writers like Doyle. We have too many politically correct, bubble book softies who want to please society to make a fortune! This alters a person's writing and reduces it to mush. I like the classics because they are uncompromising, original and no where near politically correct. Sherlock Holmes stories are the best!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I sing of a great translation..., March 14 2006
By 
FrKurt Messick "FrKurt Messick" (Bloomington, IN USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Aeneid (Paperback)
Roman society was enamoured of Greek culture -- many of the best 'Roman' things were Greek; the major gods were derivative of the Greek pantheon; philosophy, literature, science, political ideals, architecture -- all this was adopted from the Greeks. It makes sense that, at the point of their ascendancy in the world, they would long for an epic history similar to the Homeric legends; the Iliad and the Odyssey, written some 500 years after the actual events they depict, tell of the heroism of the Greeks in their battle against Troy (Ilium). The Aeneid, written by Vergil 700 years after Homer, at the commission of Augustus (himself in the process of consolidating his authority over Rome), turns the heroic victory of the much-admired Greeks on its head by postulating a survivor from Troy, Aeneas, who undergoes as journey akin to the Odyssey, even further afield.
Vergil constructs Aeneas, a very minor character in the Iliad, as the princely survivor and pilgrim from Troy, on a journey through the Mediterranean in search of a new home. According to Fitzgerald, who wrote a brief postscript to the poem, Vergil created a Homeric hero set in a Homeric age, purposefully following the Iliad and Odyssey as if they were formula, in the way that many a Hollywood director follows the formulaic pattern of past successful films. Vergil did not create the Trojan legend of Roman origins, but his poem solidified the notion in popular and scholarly sentiment.
Vergil sets the seeds for future animosity between Carthage and Rome in the Aeneid, too -- the curse of queen Dido on the descendants of Aeneas of never-ending strife played into then-recent recollections of war in the Roman mind. Books I through VI are much more studied than VII through XII, but the whole of the Aeneid is a spectacular tale.
Fitzgerald's modern and accessible translation makes the Aeneid really come to life for modern readers. It is a verse translation, not forced into word-by-word construction nor into false, flowery and stuffy structured verse that would seem formal and distant. This is a language familiar to modern readers, just as Vergil's Latin would have been readily accessible to the listeners and readers of his time.
Vergil died before he could complete the story. He wished it to be burned; fortunately, Augustus had other ideas. Still, there are incomplete lines and thoughts, and occasional conflicts in the storyline that one assumes might have been worked out in the end, had more editing time been available. Despite these, the Aeneid remains a masterpiece, and Fitzgerald's translation will be a standard bearer for some time to come.
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5.0 out of 5 stars My dear Holmes, May 16 2010
By 
E. A Solinas "ea_solinas" (MD USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Everybody knows him -- the pipe-smoking detective on Baker Street (with or without the movie-added deerstalker), who is able to deduce all sorts of things just by glancing at a person. "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" shows off Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's first collection of short stories involving Holmes, mingling human psychology with sometimes bizarre mysteries.

Holmes is visited by the masked King of Bohemia, who has a slight problem: he's engaged to a princess, but his former lover Irene Adler has a compromising letter that could jeopardize his future marriage. But Adler has a formidable brain of her own. Then Holmes is hired by a man who was hired by the mysterious Red-Headed League, and given a strange job... which is somehow connected to a criminal undertaking.

Among the other strange cases that Holmes and Watson undertake -- a missing fiance, a strange murder in Boscombe Valley, a dead man who was sent five orange seeds, a woman whose husband has utterly vanished, a blue jewel hidden in a Christmas turkey, a dead woman whose last words were "it was the band, the speckled band!", a young engineer given a dream job, an American heiress who vanishes directly after her wedding, a broken beryl coronet, and a young woman given a surreally weird job.

Sherlock Holmes mysteries come in two types:
1. The case is completely baffling, and Holmes is needed to unravel the knot of obscure clues.
2. The case seems straightforward, but Holmes is needed to connect seemingly unrelated clues to the crime in order to find the REAL perpetrator.

There are plenty of both kinds in "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes," with a dozen cases that require Holmes' unique detecting skills -- it can be something as simple as locating a letter, or something as complex as foiling a robbery or counterfeiting ring. Doyle's stately, dignified prose is heightened by moments of excitement or horror (" It swelled up louder and louder, a hoarse yell of pain and fear and anger all mingled in the one dreadful shriek"), and he wove in a lot of human psychology into Holmes' cases.

Holmes himself... is Holmes. Doyle didn't like his detective much, but Sherlock's knife-edged intellect and fascination with puzzles are strangely hypnotic -- even if you wouldn't like to be roomies with the guy, it would be amazing just to sit and watch him work. Watson is the perfect counterpoint for Holmes: he's not a genius but is definitely intelligent, warm-hearted and capable.

"The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" is a magnificent collection of Holmes' first twelve short cases, filled with murder, intrigue and all sorts of weird crimes. An absolute must-read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I LOVE A MYSTERY, ESPECIALLY THIS ONE!, Jan. 19 2010
By 
Gail Cooke (TX, USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Who doesn't love a good mystery, especially one by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle? His creation Sherlock Holmes is the prototype for countless modern detective writers and continues to entertain us with unparalleled stories sparked by Holmes's brilliance and powers of reasoning. Abetted by his unforgettable sidekick, Dr. Watson, he is called upon to solve not only the most puzzling but the most dastardly cases.

We might say these adventures ably narrated by Ralph Cosham are a synthesis of Doyle's work. There are 12 stories in all from A Scandal in Bohemia to The Adventure of the Copper Beeches. It would be impossible for this listener/reader to pick a favorite but one that stands out in my mind is The Beryl Coronet.

First published in 1892 this story features a banker, Arthur Holder, who makes a sizeable loan to an established citizen. The Beryl Coronet, which is extremely valuable is left as security. Holder determines the Coronet would not be secure in the bank, so he takes it home and puts it in his personal safe. That night he's awakened by strange noises and finds Arthur, his son, with the Coronet in his hand. This scene is witnessed by Holder's niece, Mary, who keels over when she sees the broken Coronet.

Arthur seems most certainly to be guilty of damaging the priceless object yet Holmes remains to be convinced (as he so often is). Several issues muddy the waters - Arthur refuses to say anything; he will not admit guilt or claim innocence. How could he have broken the Coronet when Holmes who is quite strong cannot begin to do so? Fortunately, footprints in the snow outside Holder's house lead Holmes to the real thief.

Narrator Cosham who has been nominated several times for an Audie Award and whose readings have been named "Audio Best of the Year" by Publishers Weekly is the perfect voice for these stories - resonant, clear with timing that adds to the suspense.

Enjoy!

- Gail Cooke
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5.0 out of 5 stars I sing of a great translation, Jan. 31 2006
By 
FrKurt Messick "FrKurt Messick" (Bloomington, IN USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: VIRGIL'S AENEID (Paperback)
Roman society was enamoured of Greek culture -- many of the best 'Roman' things were Greek; the major gods were derivative of the Greek pantheon; philosophy, literature, science, political ideals, architecture -- all this was adopted from the Greeks. It makes sense that, at the point of their ascendancy in the world, they would long for an epic history similar to the Homeric legends; the Iliad and the Odyssey, written some 500 years after the actual events they depict, tell of the heroism of the Greeks in their battle against Troy (Ilium). The Aeneid, written by Vergil 700 years after Homer, at the commission of Augustus (himself in the process of consolidating his authority over Rome), turns the heroic victory of the much-admired Greeks on its head by postulating a survivor from Troy, Aeneas, who undergoes as journey akin to the Odyssey, even further afield.
Vergil constructs Aeneas, a very minor character in the Iliad, as the princely survivor and pilgrim from Troy, on a journey through the Mediterranean in search of a new home. According to Fitzgerald, who wrote a brief postscript to the poem, Vergil created a Homeric hero set in a Homeric age, purposefully following the Iliad and Odyssey as if they were formula, in the way that many a Hollywood director follows the formulaic pattern of past successful films. Vergil did not create the Trojan legend of Roman origins, but his poem solidified the notion in popular and scholarly sentiment.
Vergil sets the seeds for future animosity between Carthage and Rome in the Aeneid, too -- the curse of queen Dido on the descendants of Aeneas of never-ending strife played into then-recent recollections of war in the Roman mind. Books I through VI are much more studied than VII through XII, but the whole of the Aeneid is a spectacular tale.
Fitzgerald's modern and accessible translation makes the Aeneid really come to life for modern readers. It is a verse translation, not forced into word-by-word construction nor into false, flowery and stuffy structured verse that would seem formal and distant. This is a language familiar to modern readers, just as Vergil's Latin would have been readily accessible to the listeners and readers of his time.
Vergil died before he could complete the story. He wished it to be burned; fortunately, Augustus had other ideas. Still, there are incomplete lines and thoughts, and occasional conflicts in the storyline that one assumes might have been worked out in the end, had more editing time been available. Despite these, the Aeneid remains a masterpiece, and Fitzgerald's translation will be a standard bearer for some time to come.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I sing of a great translation..., July 16 2004
By 
FrKurt Messick "FrKurt Messick" (Bloomington, IN USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Aeneid (Paperback)
Roman society was enamoured of Greek culture -- many of the best 'Roman' things were Greek; the major gods were derivative of the Greek pantheon; philosophy, literature, science, political ideals, architecture -- all this was adopted from the Greeks. It makes sense that, at the point of their ascendancy in the world, they would long for an epic history similar to the Homeric legends; the Iliad and the Odyssey, written some 500 years after the actual events they depict, tell of the heroism of the Greeks in their battle against Troy (Ilium). The Aeneid, written by Vergil 700 years after Homer, at the commission of Augustus (himself in the process of consolidating his authority over Rome), turns the heroic victory of the much-admired Greeks on its head by postulating a survivor from Troy, Aeneas, who undergoes as journey akin to the Odyssey, even further afield.
Vergil constructs Aeneas, a very minor character in the Iliad, as the princely survivor and pilgrim from Troy, on a journey through the Mediterranean in search of a new home. According to Fitzgerald, who wrote a brief postscript to the poem, Vergil created a Homeric hero set in a Homeric age, purposefully following the Iliad and Odyssey as if they were formula, in the way that many a Hollywood director follows the formulaic pattern of past successful films. Vergil did not create the Trojan legend of Roman origins, but his poem solidified the notion in popular and scholarly sentiment.
Vergil sets the seeds for future animosity between Carthage and Rome in the Aeneid, too -- the curse of queen Dido on the descendants of Aeneas of never-ending strife played into then-recent recollections of war in the Roman mind. Books I through VI are much more studied than VII through XII, but the whole of the Aeneid is a spectacular tale.
Fitzgerald's modern and accessible translation makes the Aeneid really come to life for modern readers. It is a verse translation, not forced into word-by-word construction nor into false, flowery and stuffy structured verse that would seem formal and distant. This is a language familiar to modern readers, just as Vergil's Latin would have been readily accessible to the listeners and readers of his time.
Vergil died before he could complete the story. He wished it to be burned; fortunately, Augustus had other ideas. Still, there are incomplete lines and thoughts, and occasional conflicts in the storyline that one assumes might have been worked out in the end, had more editing time been available. Despite these, the Aeneid remains a masterpiece, and Fitzgerald's translation will be a standard bearer for some time to come.
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The Complete Sherlock Holmes: All 4 Novels and 56 Short Stories
The Complete Sherlock Holmes: All 4 Novels and 56 Short Stories by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Mass Market Paperback - Oct. 1 1986)
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