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5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely excellent
This book started me reading, literally, 12 years ago. I was not a reader until one day I happened upon this book, since then I have read countless books. The book is interesting, adventurous and exciting. I have never read a book quite like it. There is a scene with a chase that had my heart pounding when they finally got away. The battles are very interesting, and...
Published on March 18 2004 by George Dimitriou

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3.0 out of 5 stars Dated Star Wars
The Jedi Academy Trilogy was one of the first set of novels to appear after Lucas gave his blessing to a new series of original books in the Star Wars universe, and unfortunately it shows.
The story is basically about the efforts to establish a new order of Jedi Knights, to replace the old order that was wiped out by the Empire. While Luke Skywalker searches the...
Published on Aug. 13 2003 by D. B. Killings


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5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely excellent, March 18 2004
By 
George Dimitriou (mays landing, nj United States) - See all my reviews
This book started me reading, literally, 12 years ago. I was not a reader until one day I happened upon this book, since then I have read countless books. The book is interesting, adventurous and exciting. I have never read a book quite like it. There is a scene with a chase that had my heart pounding when they finally got away. The battles are very interesting, and the story takes the reader to many different places. The only qirk is that andersons puts 50 ties in his squadrons and 300 to an SD, this is incorrect, there are twelve fighters to a squadron, and an Imperial class holds only 72. Despite this detail, this is one of the greatest books I've ever read. The only other star wars novel that comes close is The Courtship of Princess Leia. This book deserves 6 stars but I can only give it five. One final note for those comparing it to Zahn's book, Timothy Zahn had most the Imperial equipment left at the end of his book, and tactically this last battle made no sense.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Jedi Knights of a new generation....., Feb. 18 2004
By 
Alex Diaz-Granados "fardreaming writer" (Miami, FL United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
It is a time of transition in the galaxy. A few years after the Battle of Endor, even though the evil Empire now only controls a quarter of its vast territory and Grand Admiral Thrawn's campaign to destroy the fledgling New Republic has been defeated, the former Rebels still face many challenges -- and many foes -- as they strive to restore peace and justice to the galaxy.
Thrawn's campaign (chronicled in the 1991-93 trilogy by Timothy Zahn) and subsequent events not only prolonged the continuing conflict between the New Republic and the dying Empire, but they also highlighted the Republic's biggest weakness -- the absence of a strong Jedi Order to help protect its values and its citizens. Where once there had been 10,000 Jedi Knights in the days before Palpatine's rise to power and the demise of the first Galactic Republic, only Luke Skywalker remains as a full-fledged Jedi.
Luke, of course, has been trying to train his twin sister Leia in the ways of the Force, but her duties as a member of the Provisional Council and her brother's recent experiences -- including a fall to the dark side and almost a repetition of their father Anakin's mistakes -- have impeded her progress as a Jedi apprentice. Leia's marriage to Han Solo and the birth of three potential Jedi children also demand her attention, so Luke must look elsewhere for Jedi apprentices.
Kevin J. Anderson's Jedi Search is the first of a three-book cycle that chronicles Luke Skywalker's endeavors to set up a new Jedi Academy and to restore the order of Jedi Knights. With very few records left over after the Great Purge inflicted by the late Emperor and his own father, Darth Vader, Luke must not only scour the galaxy for data on the training of new Knights, but he also needs to find new candidates to teach.
Even as Luke gets approval from the New Republic to set up a Jedi academy, new challenges and old enemies arise. On Kessel, Han Solo and Chewbacca are captured by Moruth Doole, a cunning mine official who now runs the entire spice mine complex -- and the individual that had, several years before, tipped off the Imperial tariff authorities that Solo was hauling a load of spice destined for crime boss Jabba the Hutt. The Millennium Falcon had been boarded, but not before Han had jettisoned the spice...which had saved him and Chewbacca from a stint in Imperial detention blocks but not, unfortunately, from a debt to Jabba.
Elsewhere, a new threat emerges as Admiral Daala, the beautiful but ruthless woman (and only female flag officer in the Imperial fleet) in command of a squadron of Star Destroyers assigned to protect a top-secret research facility, prepares to unleash a new campaign against the Rebels who killed her paramour and destroyed her beloved Empire. With her four massive warships and several powerful super weapons at her disposal, Daala bides her time, waiting for the proper moment to start her devastating strike....
Anderson, a technical editor and writer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and author of other non-Star Wars novels, has become one of the most prolific authors of Star Wars Expanded Universe material. He loves the universe created by George Lucas in his five films (even though some of the Jedi concepts here are radically different from data established in the two prequels released in 1999 and 2002) and knows the characters and situations well enough to write interesting and entertaining "further adventures" novels, comic book series, and short stories set "a long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away...."
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4.0 out of 5 stars It was enjoyable overall and left me wanting more., Feb. 7 2004
This book was fun. It was the first book I had read of the extended Star Wars universe and I loved almost every minute of it. I say almost because Anderson likes to have several story lines going at once and not all of them appealed to me. Nevertheless, it was enjoyable overall and left me wanting more so I read the next two books in the series.
I have also since read the Zahn trilogy and various other short stories in the Star Wars universe. Though some find Anderson's works inferior when compared to other Star Wars novels, I do not hold this opinion. Anderson keeps the story centered around characters that you already care about and, when new ones are introduced, he does an adequate job of developing them. He does tend to use some repetative phrasing but the basic story is well thought out. Though the trilogy does finally lose some emotional steam by the third book and ends with a bit of melodrama, still this trilogy is a fun read and I highly recommend it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Star Wars: Jedi Search--Book for The Star Wars Fans, Dec 8 2003
By 
Alex (Grayslake, IL) - See all my reviews
The book is about how Luke Skywalker is going to set up his very own Jedi Academy so he can train new Jedi Knights. He gets three new Jedi Knights in the story,Gantoris,Kyp Durron and Tymmo. Luke goes through a diffcult time to get the new Jedi's through their training. This is also a good story on Han Solo and his partner Chewbacca who get caught by Moruth Doole and force Han and Chewbacca to work the mines of Kessel. You will have to read to see if they escape. There are also good stories on Leia Organa Solo, Lando Calrissian,C-3P0 and R2-D2. I recommend this book to anyone who likes Star Wars or who likes science fiction. I don't like to read but, this book made me read and I plan to read the rest of the Star Wars Saga.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Why Zahn and Daley are Great Authors and Anderson not, Dec 4 2003
By A Customer
After reading Zahn's excellent Thrawn trilogy in the early 90's, I was hungry for more and picked up this book. By the first chapter I knew I wouldn't even read the rest of it. Well, actually I did skim through it and read a few more scenes, but they were just as bad as the first.
Here's an important example...
On page 5 of "Jedi Search," Han and Chewbacca are flying towards a planet when two TIE fighters come up out of the atmosphere, begin shooting, and fly back to the planet. Now they see an old X-wing come up behind them and Han says, "Chewie, contact the X-wing and tell him we'd appreciate whatever help he can give us."
When I read that, I was like, "What? Even I'd know not to trust a strange ship." But Han just keeps looking ahead, gets blasted from behind, and yells, "We've got to get out of here!"
I mean, give me a break. This is C3PO driving the Falcon, not Han.
Now check out Chapter 12 of Zahn's "Heir to the Empire." Here Han is also flying towards a planet, and also sees an X-Wing come up beside him. It has Republic markings, and they even hear Luke's voice over the radio, but while Leia is relieved to see him, Han is still on guard.
"It was Luke's X-wing, all right. Or at least, it looked like Luke's X-wing. 'So,' he said casually, swiveling the laser cannons around to target the other. Situated the way it was, the X-wing would have to yaw 90 degrees around before it could fire at them. Unless, of course, it had been modified... Somehow, they needed to make a positive identification, and fast."
He can see it's Luke's own X-wing, and hear his voice, but still doesn't trust it. Is even watching out for an unexpected attack. In short, here's a pilot I'd trust. And an author I trust as well.
Also, check out the language. In Anderson's book, Han says, "Chewie, get over here. I'm taking the laser cannon." Would Han really say that? In Zahn's book he says, "Chewie, take over; I'm going to fire up the quads."
Of course, the best Star Wars action writing is to be found in Brian Daley's Han Solo trilogy. On the very first page of "Han Solo at Star's End," as they're about to be attacked, Han says, "Charge main batteries, Chewie, and shields-all." Quick and to the point - just what a seasoned pilot would say.
And Daley, too, knows well the art of deception in war. In fact, he's a Vietnam veteran from the 11th Armored Cavalry. Here's Han's advice to other pilots before a battle: "'Since we're protecting a ground installation, we'll have to ride our kills. Don't think just because he's nosediving and leaving a vapor trail that he's out of it. That's an old trick. If you get an explosion from him, fine. If you get a flamer, let him go; he's finished. But otherwise you ride your kill all the way down to the cellar.'"
All Anderson's Han is able to say is "Chewie, I think you'd better get our forward deflectors up," and "Turn it around!"

So while I hate to dump on any author, Anderson's book just doesn't make the grade set by Lucas, Daley, and Zahn. If you've read them all and want more, go for it. But there's no need to start here when there's so many better works to enjoy.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Jedi Academy as a subplot, Dec 2 2003
This review is for the whole trilogy.
First off, I enjoyed the books. They were fast paced and fun. It will be well worth the time for a Star Wars fan.
However, I picked these 3 books up on the hopes of finding out mostly what is going on with Skywalker establishing the New Jedi Order and what he went through to build the academy. Granted that material was in there but it was far from the main focus. Despite being the "Jedi Academy" trilogy, I felt that the new school was more of a subplot rather than the main focus. Actually the books didn't seem to have a main focus...there were no less than 3 main plots each of them having the same importance.
The books were very good but be wary if you expect 900 pages of new Jedi lore.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Dated Star Wars, Aug. 13 2003
By 
D. B. Killings "Dagnabbit!" (Chicago, IL United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
The Jedi Academy Trilogy was one of the first set of novels to appear after Lucas gave his blessing to a new series of original books in the Star Wars universe, and unfortunately it shows.
The story is basically about the efforts to establish a new order of Jedi Knights, to replace the old order that was wiped out by the Empire. While Luke Skywalker searches the galaxy for potentials, Han and Chewie stumble upon a very powerful candidate while stuck on the mining world of Kessel, Leia is up to her neck in politics and trying to be a good mother for her twin children, and Lando tries to schmooze his way to the next Big Deal. Added to this mix are a hidden Imperial weapons research facility, a very dedicated female Imperial Admiral, and a petty Imperial loyalist with delusions of grandeur, and what you end up with is a hefty assortment of plot lines and potential entanglements for our heroes, all inter-spaced with the usual dollop of gun play, space battles, and a light saber or two.
The story moves at a rapid pace, almost as if KJ Anderson were trying to stuff about ten episodes of a television series into one book. The general effect of this is that the novel tends to be more episodic than a smoothly flowing tale, and some of the sub-stories feel so irrelevant to the main plot that they come across almost like filler, as if Anderson were trying to pad his page count just a little. Because of this characterization suffers; the regulars (Han, Luke, Leia, etc.) all come across as a little flat, and the new characters (Kyp Durron, Admiral Daala) feel a little rushed and cardboard. But the ending is pretty good space opera, although a little improbable on the coincidence side, and enough interesting threads remain hanging to draw you to the next book.
Sadly, the biggest problem with Jedi Search, and indeed the series as a whole, is that the books have become incredibly dated since the advent of the First Trilogy. We know a lot more about the original Jedi and their practices now, and quite frankly the image as depicted in the books doesn't quite mesh with what we've seen in the movies. Yeah, I know, the Star Wars authors have attempted to get around this by saying that all knowledge of Jedi training was lost with the purge, but logically you'd think that even the public knowledge (like, that Jedi didn't marry and were discouraged from fraternizing) would have filtered down to Luke's time -- it's only 20-30 years later, after all, not hundreds or thousands of years! You'll have to put all of this down to the fact that the authors were pretty much making things up without being privy to Lucas's thoughts on the matter, and the end result is the distinct impression that you're reading something that is taking place in a slightly alternate universe to the movies.
Anyway, rant aside, Jedi Search is adequate for most Star Wars fans. I don't think I'd give it anyone who wasn't interested in the SW universe, though, but if you're looking for a Star Wars Classic fix, it's worth an afternoon or two.
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4.0 out of 5 stars To much important happen here to ignor!, June 21 2003
By 
JediMack (VALRICO, FL USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Star Wars: The Jedi Academy: Jedi Search: Volume 1 (Audio Cassette)
OK! I have problems with some of the writing here but this trilogy when combined with I, Jedi are important contributions to the SW Universe. We get Kessel, the Maw installation, Kip, adm Daala who reappears then disappears, Qui Xu, the first hint of the aftermath of Dark Empire, and more Wedge (now a critical character). I had some problem with the story like: The spirit of a dead jedi having such tremedous power, the whole idea of the Suncrusher and the studip diversion of the blob race storyline. Unlike some, I feel that some of the darkhorse comics have made important contributions the SW Expanded Universe. Dark Empire was one of them.
For those of you who plan to read the New Jedi Order books, you'll find that Kevin J Anderson has made important contributions to SW including this trilogy and the young jedi books (the YJ books are surprisingly good).
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1.0 out of 5 stars Terrible, Bad characterizations, simply poor quality, June 4 2003
Kevin Anderson might be a very enthusiastic about writing for the Star Wars universe. I happen to be on a project reviewing all the Star Wars book that have come out and since I have read and own all of them, I reread them in anticipation of these reviews. The first book in the Jedi Academy Trilogy is not the worst of the series, but it is poor and simply put it gets worse with every read. I was in junior high when I first read this book and it did not seem too bad, but now I review it as a college graduate and it's simply terrible. Wedge Antilles piloting a contruction droid instead of a starfighter? Ok perhaps Wedge needed some time off but come on. Lando Calrissian reduced to poverty? No. Princess Leia, who was quite advance in her Jedi training during the Thrawn Trilogy is now a barely compatent apprentice. I mean the characterizations of the classic characters are all out of whack (technical term). Useless characters are constantly being introduced: Admiral Daala, the most incompatent Imperial officer ever written. She was supposed to be a feared tactician but all she looks like is totally pathetic commander. Gantoris and the whole "dark man" idea, just a little bit predictable. Kyp Durron, the Luke Skywalker clone. While Durron has evolved into a solid character in the New Jedi Order books, most Star Wars authors for the pre-NJO simply avoid him because he is a poor character. Qui Xu, why have her? A scientist who invented the Death Star didn't know what it was used for? Ok brainwashing is understandable to a point but come on. Then Wedge has to fall in love with her, yeah makes perfect sense; and last but not least, another superweapon. One as big as an X-Wing and more powerful than the Death Star: The Sun Crusher. Bad name, bad idea, simply a bad story. Book 2 is even worse, before book 3 comes back a little
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5.0 out of 5 stars Oh, and Lando made a Fortune Gambling (again)..., June 3 2003
By 
Matt (Minnesota USA) - See all my reviews
This book is set 7 years after the Return of the Jedi. It was interesting, Han Crashes the Falcon, He's sent to the Spice mines of Kessel, that sort of thing (He reeeally was, this time {no kidding}) Then they find a fleet of star destroyers in a black hole, and go back to Coruscant.Luke is looking for jedi people to train. Oh, and Lando made a Fortune Gambling (again). It's a little bizzare, but that's all in the fun Kevin J. Anderson. I recommend this book greatly.
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Star Wars: The Jedi Academy: Jedi Search: Volume 1
Star Wars: The Jedi Academy: Jedi Search: Volume 1 by Kevin Anderson (Audio Cassette - Feb. 1 1994)
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