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4.0 out of 5 stars Finding Yourself
Another delightful tale from Mr. Koontz. This one tells the tale of how you can find yourself after you've lost your life, or at least how your life used to be. Truman learns to live again through a lost child and the return visit of an old friend. I enjoyed the ending... I didn't see it coming.
Published on April 19 2004 by Dawn S

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great Book, Poor Reader
I find the story very interesting as I do most of Dean Koontz's books. This one however suffers from poor reading on the part of Dylan Baker. Voice characterizations all run together and the voice of Dylan Baker is hard to listen to for extended periods of time.
Published on Aug. 20 2003 by Lorraine Zabel


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Koontz needs to read up on political theory, May 6 2004
By 
"costello@cats.ucsc.edu" (San Jose, CA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Face (Hardcover)
I suppose my problem with The Face isn't one most people share- I found his writing enjoyable and the plot line to be interesting (albeit a bit predictable). The thing is that Koontz chose to write about something he doesn't know anything about- anarchism. Before you go on, I must warn you, I'm a former student of political science that spent a long time studying and writing about anarchism as a political theory, so this might bore alot of you. Clearly, instead of reading anything about a complex political theory, Koontz went with the tired old equation that anarchism=violence and chaos. True anarchist theory is actually more about cooperation and human connection than chaos and destruction. Anyway, I won't go on and on about it- if you want to read more I suggest Post-Scarcity Anarchism by Murray Bookchin or Anarchism and Other Essays by Emma Goldman. My point is that I found it disappointing that Koontz decided to write about a political theory without researching it and consequently portrayed it in a misleading fashion. I'm not saying anarchism is what I believe in or necesarrily what is right for society, but it is not the destructive force Koontz makes it out to be. His portrayal is inaccurate and disingenuous at best. Anyway, that's my rant on the subject.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great Book, Poor Reader, Aug. 20 2003
By 
Lorraine Zabel "elkiesmom" (New Port Richey Florida United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Face (Audio Cassette)
I find the story very interesting as I do most of Dean Koontz's books. This one however suffers from poor reading on the part of Dylan Baker. Voice characterizations all run together and the voice of Dylan Baker is hard to listen to for extended periods of time.
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3.0 out of 5 stars How can he have such an excellent vocabulary but not know the meaning of the words "anarchist" and "Marxist"?, April 15 2012
By 
Adira Rotstein "Scifi Degby" (Toronto) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Face (Hardcover)
I have not finished reading this book yet, but I would like to comment on some features I've noticed so far that make it unusual.

One is the language; I find the language in this book very interesting and rich. The way he uses words shows a familiarity with a much wider range of vocabulary than most authors exhibit today, which was much appreciated by this somewhat jaded reader. At the same time the proverbial "ten cent" words were not used in such a way as to obscure the meaning of the sentences or action which I also appreciated.

Editing: I think this book, like many of Stephen King's recent works could do with some more strenuous editing. As much as I love words, there is no need to describe a single noun with three similes when a single word would do.

Politics: One of the most frustrating things is the fact that the author doesn't seem to understand or care about the true meanings of some of the political belief systems represented in the book. Any cursery look in a dictionary could show you that his characterization of Corky Laputa chiefly as an "anarchist" is completely wrong. I don't believe this is because Koontz is not intelligent or well read, but because he wishes to forward a conservative political agenda.

The definition of Anarchism is "a political philosophy which holds the state to be undesirable, unnecessary, and harmful, or alternatively as opposing authority and hierarchical organization in the conduct of human relations.[3 Proponents of anarchism, known as "anarchists", advocate stateless societies based on non-hierarchical[3][9][10] voluntary associations." Anarchists simply believe that government is unnecessary and serves only to benefit those in charge, rather than the people at large. They believe in non-heirarchical forms of political decision making. Anarchists do not believe in "chaos." While popluarly we thing anarchy=chaos, in a political systems viewpoint, anarchists believe the chaos and harm in our society are actually caused by oppressive controlling governments and that to remove government will bring about less suffering and oppression.

The ideas Corky espouses in the book about creating chaos, suffering in other humans and sowing hatred and distrust among people until all society is razed to the ground and then a new order can be established (though this is lightly touched on and Corky focuses more on the "making the world burn" efforts than the designing of a new society) is more characteristic of extreme right Christian fundamentalists who want to "bring the rapture" than anarchists.

A typical anarchist political action is more likely to be along the lines of the activities of Wikileaks or Anonymous hackers who operate under the belief system that "information should be free" and that the government has no right to keep things from the governed. If an anarchist engages in violence, it is typically against targets perceived to be related to oppressive government or corporations they don't like. This usually involves vandalism of public property or violence. They don't seem to delight in sadism or torture of other human beings as seen in the book or just harming random people. Anarchism, although not a practical political system to aspire to in my opinion, still does not = Molloch.

Also the political system Corky's mother supposedly espoused is supposed to be "Marxism" it is not described as Marxism, but rather as something closer to "Objectivism." Basically, that human beings are completely motivated by envy, hate and aquisition and that there is no room for human cooperation in that equation. His mother does exhibit some traits similar to Anne Rand, but as Objectivism is considered a far-right theory of politics, perhaps it serves his purpose better to make the character a Marxist.

Angels: What is up with the angels? As soon as we find out a certain character is a "guardian angel" it feels like a cheat and it makes the story cheesy, as if it is a horrored-up "It's a Wonderful Life." Up until then I was totally with the story, afterward this revelation I separated somewhat. Angels, heaven, hell, all these things seem too contrived for a writer with such obvious intelligence and depth of understanding of the human condition to expect an intelligent reader to take at face value in what is ostensibly a story about a cop, the son of a movie star and an "anarchist." Not to mention the *69 phone connection to hell which is just stupid.

STill, he is a master of suspense and I can't put the book down!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Finding Yourself, April 19 2004
This review is from: The Face (Hardcover)
Another delightful tale from Mr. Koontz. This one tells the tale of how you can find yourself after you've lost your life, or at least how your life used to be. Truman learns to live again through a lost child and the return visit of an old friend. I enjoyed the ending... I didn't see it coming.
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4.0 out of 5 stars MARY IS SUCH A BORING NAME, July 20 2006
I WOULD LIKE TO ADDRESS THE REVIEW MADE BY MARY. PERSONALLY I REALLY APPRECIATE SEEING NEW NAMES IN MODERN PAPERBACKS AND I DONT FIND IT ALL THAT UNLIKELY THAT THERE IS A COP OUT THERE SOMEWHERE NAMED ETHAN. AND THE NAME CORKY WAS NOT HIS ACTUAL NAME IF YOU ACTUALLY PAY ATTENTION TO THE CHARACTER YOU REALIZE THERE IS NO BETTER NAME FOR THE ANTAGONIST. HE HONESTLY BELIEVED HE WAS A GOOD CHEERY PERSON BETTERING THE WORLD SO HE NAMED HIMSELF AS HE SAW FIT. I WOULD ALSO LIKE TO ADD THAT J.K. ROWLING COMES UP WITH EVEN WEIRDER NAMES AND YOU DONT SEE HER FANS COMPLAINING, IN FACT, PEOPLE LIKE THE NAMES BECAUSE THEY GO WITH THE WEIRD OUT OF THE WORLD THEME THAT THE HARRY POTTER BOOKS ARE FAMOUS FOR. AND AS FOR AELFRIC, WELL I DONT FIND THAT NAME WEIRD AT ALL WHEN YOU THINK OF WHAT CELEBRITIES ARE NAMING THERE KIDS THESE DAYS. I TOTALLY RECOMMEND THIS BOOK. IT MAY BE SLOW AT TIMES, BUT THE CRAZY ANARCHIST SCHEMES CORKY COMES UP WITH MAKE IT TOTALLY WORTH IT. IM NOT SURE IF I REALLY THINK THE ENDING WAS WORTH THE BUILD UP BUT THE CHARACTER DEVELOPEMENT AND SIDE- STORYS THAT TOOK PLACE IN THE MIDDLE OF THE STORY BALANCE IT OUT. P.S. MY REAL NAME IS RICA WEIRD EH
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5.0 out of 5 stars First Koontz Book, the first of many!, Oct. 22 2004
By 
My first book of his, I thought it was amazing. I am hooked on his writing now!
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5.0 out of 5 stars An Absolute Must Read, July 12 2004
This review is from: The Face (Hardcover)
WOW! Just finished the book, grabbed me and wouldn't let go, cried my eyes out at the end, page after page of tears!! Absolutely the best book ever! To all Koontz fans this is a 'must read' to all other readers, your about to become a FAN!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Amazing, July 5 2004
By 
Marianne Davis (Massachusetts) - See all my reviews
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Koontz' best book...ever! Amazing, outstanding, terrifying, fabulous...down right evil!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Doesn't Get Much Better Than This ..., June 30 2004
By 
E. Taylor (Fairfield, CT United States) - See all my reviews
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No need to tell the story ... just know that this is one of the best books I've read in a long time. Excellent! I've recommended it to many and will continue to do so. It was such a terrific story, I actually cried at the end of the book. Not the usual for me after reading a Koontz book. It has become one of my favorites.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Not up to par, June 30 2004
By 
Ethan Straffin (Palo Alto, CA USA) - See all my reviews
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The good news is that Dean Koontz shows no signs of wearing out his welcome. _From the Corner of His Eye_ and _One Door Away from Heaven_ -- two of his other recent works -- alone should prove this. Both reflect Koontz's ever-evolving mixture of suspense, humor, and personal awakenings inspired by supernatural/spiritual occurrences. I might even call them haunting, in the best possible sense.
The only bad news is that _The Face_ is that much more puzzling and disappointing by comparison. While the familiar Koontz themes are here, the paper-thin plot grants them little room for purchase. The child protagonist is, if not *quite* as dumb as a post, easily the least compelling of the young heroes and heroines that Koontz has crafted in the recent past. The attempts at humorous banter fall flat with uncharacteristic frequency. The police-procedural stuff is just plain boring, while the Big Picture that it's meant to illustrate -- namely, that police are frequently martyred, and that it's all due to those darn politicians and voters and especially (spit) academics -- is hammered into our heads to a degree that is too insultingly simplistic to be worthy of this author. Not since _Dragon Tears_ has Koontz felt the need to rant for this many pages on behalf of a political point, and while I love politics as much as the next guy: if I wanted Fox News, I'd *watch* Fox News. Dean, baby, you're so much better when you're something approaching subtle.
My take on _The Face_ is either that it was ghostwritten, or that Koontz's publisher took what could have been a decent enough 200-page addition to the Nancy Drew canon and forced him at gunpoint to expand it to over three times that. Clearly, one can't be creative under the latter conditions, so this is what we got. (Was he trying to send us a cry for help by naming it after a character whom we never meet?)
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The Face: A Novel
The Face: A Novel by Dean Koontz (Paperback - Sept. 29 2009)
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