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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!
Dan Siegel's Whole-Brain Child is a truly practical parenting guide. The title does NOT say it all! Although the techniques in the book are based on solid brain science, that is not the book's greatest appeal. Rather, the book is excellent because it offers parents specific, easy-to-use strategies that they will be able to immediately apply - strategies that will help...
Published on Jan. 22 2012 by Sarah Chana Radcliffe

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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars average quality
This book is well organized. Throughout, I clearly see that it was written with the good intention of helping parents and their children. The authors made an honest attempt to write a practical and useful book.

Nevertheless, I am in doubt about its practicability. I was drawn to this book because I read that the authors were doing research in brain science...
Published on June 30 2012 by Kristina Sendova, London, Ontario


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!, Jan. 22 2012
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This review is from: The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind (Hardcover)
Dan Siegel's Whole-Brain Child is a truly practical parenting guide. The title does NOT say it all! Although the techniques in the book are based on solid brain science, that is not the book's greatest appeal. Rather, the book is excellent because it offers parents specific, easy-to-use strategies that they will be able to immediately apply - strategies that will help elicit their child's cooperation while simultaneously helping to build the child's "emotional intelligence." The cartoon instructions are a big bonus, helping to clarify the intervention for both parents and kids. In fact, Siegel has taken a unique approach of explaining the techniques to both adult readers and their children - something rarely (ever?) seen in parenting books. I particularly like the way Siegel shows us both what NOT to do and then what TO do. He makes the material easy and fun to learn. Siegel's techniques give parents tools to help their kids think and feel better. This is a wonderful book that I will be recommending to my own clients and students.
Sarah Chana Radcliffe, author "Raise Your Kids without Raising Your Voice." Raise Your Kids Without Raising Your Voice
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars More Bookish Thoughts..., Sept. 20 2013
By 
Reader Writer Runner (Victoria, BC) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
Siegel and Bryson's "The Whole-Brain Child" offers an insightful, useful parenting resource that provides tools to ensure well-rounded development. The authors reveal 12 “whole-brain” strategies, suggesting that, the more we know about how the human brain operates, the more we can do to shape and direct it in difficult times.

Most readers will have familiarity with the concept of “right brain” vs. “left brain” but the book also distinguishes between the “upstairs” (cognition) and the “downstairs" (automation). Ideally, all of these parts work together harmoniously; tantrums and meltdowns occur when one part of the brain temporarily takes over, causing “dis-integration.” The book thus aims to help both children and adults re-intigrate their brains.

The authors accessibly include a fair amount of brain science, presenting it for both adult and child audiences. They summarize each strategy into comics form at the end of each chapter and include an appendix, which serves as a handy reference guide.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How and why "the moments you are just trying to survive are actually opportunities to help your child to thrive", Oct. 9 2012
By 
Robert Morris (Dallas, Texas) - See all my reviews
(TOP 10 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
As a father of three sons and a daughter and one of the grandfathers of their ten children, I can certainly understand what Daniel Siegel and Tina Payne Bryson have in mind while discussing moments of extreme stress for parents when their children become infuriating and intolerable. That is why I was intrigued by their explanation of the power of the "whole-brain approach" during all manner of touchpoints in parent-child relationships. That power is especially helpful in "the moments you are just trying to survive" because it creates "opportunities to help your child to thrive." In fact, the 12 strategies that Siegal and Bryson recommend can be effective for almost [begin italics] anyone [end italics] who has direct and frequent contact with children, including teachers, coaches, and clergy as well as parents and other relatives.

In fact, with only minor modification, I think they can be beneficial to interactive relationships between and among adults, especially to those within a workplace.

"What's great about this survive-and-thrive approach is that you don't have to try to carve out special time to help your children thrive. You can use [begin italics] all [end italics] of the interactions you share - the stressful, angry ones as well as the miraculous, adorable ones - as opportunities to help them become the responsible, caring, capable people you want them to be. That's what this book is about: using those everyday moments with your kids to help them reach their true potential."

These are among the passages that caught my eye:

o Integration of Various Mental Domains (Pages 6-10)
o Get in the Flow: Navigating the Waters Between Chaos and Rigidity (10-13)
o Left Brain, Right Brain: An Introduction (15-16)
o Two Halves Make a Whole: Combining the Left and the Right (18-22)
o The Mental Staircase: Integrating the Upstairs and Downstairs Brain (38-41)
o Integrating Ourselves: Using Our Own Mental Staircase (64-65)
o Integrating Implicit and Explicit: Assembling the Puzzle Pieces of the Mind (76-86)
o Mindsight and the Wheel of Awareness (93-97)
o Integrating Ourselves: Looking at Our Own Wheel of Awareness (117-118)
o Laying the Groundwork for Connection: Creating Positive Mental Models (125-127)
o Cultivating a "Yes" State of Mind: Helping Kids Be Receptive to Relationships (129-133)
o Integrating Ourselves: Making Sense of Our Own Story (143-144)

Note: I urge you to check out another of Siegal's books, Mindsight: The New Science of Personal Transformation, in which Mindsight and the Wheel of Awareness are among the subjects discussed.

Readers will appreciate Siegal and Bryson's skillful use of "What You Can Do" sections throughout their narrative that serve several purposes, notably focusing on key points while suggesting specific initiatives to apply what has been learned from the given material. For example, "What You Can Do: Helping Your Child Work from Both Sides of the Brain" (Pages 22-33). Dozens of eminently appropriate illustrations were created by Tuesday Mourning.

However, no brief commentary such as mine could possibly do full justice to the scope and depth of what Siegal and Bryson cover, with eloquence as well as rigor. I have elected not to list the twelve (12) strategies because I think they are best revealed in context, within the narrative. I do presume to suggest that those who are about to read this book begin and then frequently review later the "Whole-Brain Ages and Stages" material (on Pages 154-168) because it creates a wide and deep context, a frame of reference, for the abundance of information, insights, and recommendations in the six preceding chapters and Conclusion, "Bringing It All Together. "

This book need not be read straight through (although I prefer that approach) but it should certainly be consulted frequently, hence the importance of "Whole-Brain Ages and Stages" and the Index as well as (I hope) passages of special importance that have been highlighted.

I also presume to suggest that Daniel Siegal and Tina Payne Bryson's brilliant book will be most valuable to whole-brain readers. In it, they provide what they characterize in the Introduction as "an antidote to parenting and academic approaches that overemphasize achievement and perfection at any cost." It is imperative that everyone involved directly (and even indirectly) with the development if children "understand some basics about the young brain that [they] are helping to grow and develop."
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Whole Brain Child, Sept. 3 2012
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This review is from: The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind (Hardcover)
I would highly recommend this book for anyone. It offers practical, easy to read information about brain development and how it impacts behaviour. I am anxious for the one on teen brain development to be published.The Whole-Brain Child: 12 Revolutionary Strategies to Nurture Your Child's Developing Mind
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Its Got It All, Feb. 16 2013
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This book not only has reader friendly explanations of the latest brain research, it also tells parents/teachers how to apply this knowledge with practical strategies to help nurture and guide our children. Is a must read for parents to be and adults of all ages. I'll be using and teaching these strategies to my students to help them manage anxiety, feel good about themselves and improve attention and learning. We are using MindUp in my classroom and not only do teachers and students "love it", it has truly helped children feel calmer and be more attentive.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Whole Brain Child, Jan. 9 2013
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A terrific book full of concrete suggestions to help you develop your childs brain. East to read even the technical info. Loved the illustrations and explanations.
A great resource for any family.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Very Good Read, Jan. 8 2015
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This book was easy to read and easy to retain. The information had a lot of simple practical applications and very helpful suggestions. I liked that the book discussed reasons why certain "tried and true" approaches actually cause long term damage and how to connect and engage with children in meaningful ways that will help foster long term success. I felt the strategies offered were easy to add into my life and I noticed benefits quickly. I use his methods even today, years after reading the book. I think this is a must have for any parent, especially parents struggling with children with emotional regulation issues.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book for anyone caring for children (and themselves), March 23 2014
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Love the simplicity and easy strategies for helping kids use their "upper" and "lower" brains! There is great information on helping adults help children to integrate memories, too.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Siegels information helps to meet the needs, Feb. 10 2014
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I like Siegels way of opening the needs of the children and helping the parents to understand their own emotions that easily block their ability to help the child.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Whole-Brain Child, Sept. 8 2013
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I liked how Dan Siegel speaks to parents in a direct way. As if he is connected to them personally.
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