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31 Reviews
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5.0 out of 5 stars A touching story of people losing hope, except a teacher...
I read The Miracle Worker on my own as a class assignment, and I am very glad I chose it. It was a very touching story of how Annie Sullivan helped Helen Keller out of the silence by teaching her how to do sign language. It was almost like a journey, watching all the events that Annie had to conquer while teaching Helen. Annie was a brave, young woman who was also...
Published on Nov. 17 2002 by Melanie Wicwar

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars It was a good book
I enjoyed this book because the book has really good charecters in it it and they are really active.And the book is also very funny because the charecters like helen do very funny things, like helen eats off of other peoples plate and she is always mad happy or sad or she is always hitting people. It is also funny when Helen tries to show people when she is happy or...
Published on Nov. 10 1999


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4.0 out of 5 stars The Miracle Worker, May 21 2003
I read the miracle worker. I thought that this book was great. It really poened my eyes to the world, and made me realise that my life isn't so bad.
Imagine yourself achild with no hearing or sight. Hard to think about huh? It's almost unbelievable that this girl, Helen Keller, grew up to be such a fine women.
With the help of Annie Sullivan Helen's life was changed drastically, not only did she learn how to communicate, she continued on and began writting books.
I believe that Annie sullivan , being once blind herself , was really a "Miracle Worker" . This is a great book and I recomend it to any one who is looking for an insperational book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars "A Teacher Who Never Gave Up", May 3 2003
By 
Nicole Miller (Los Angeles, CA) - See all my reviews
The Miracle Worker, by William Gibson, is a dramatic play retelling the once lived lives of the exceptional Annie Sullivan and her young pupil, Helen Keller.
The story revolves around Helen, a young 12 yr old deaf/blind mute who has been forced to grow up in a world which has denied her language and understanding. Her family includes her father- Arthur Keller, known as "Captain," a retired army officer, who has a need to be in control of situations, her mother- Kate Keller, who displays the most affection to the girl, "her Helen" whom she can deny nothing from, and finally, her half brother- James Keller, whose sarcastic remarks and slight jealousy toward Helen are made apparent throughout the story. All are dumbfounded by her condition, and continue to spoil her with their pity and attempt to control her actions with "treats," such as candy or cake. The end-result, leaving Helen to resemble that of a "wild creature," doing as she pleases and relying on all of her instincts- including anger and rage when not getting her way.
This is where Annie Sullivan comes in. Partially blind herself, Annie, a young woman in her twenties, is hired by the Kellers in attempts to help control Helen and to "tame" her uncivilized behavior. Haunted by her dark past, but strong-willed nonetheless, Annie takes this mission full on-and a difficult one it turns out to be. These two girls go head to head, testing each other's wits and pushing each other to their limit. In the end, though, they learn from one another and obtain a newly-found respect for each other.
This inspirational story touches the heart and awakens the senses within the readers-just as Helen learns to do. It takes you into an unimaginable journey, through which a child, who knows no sight, nor sound, not even a language, learns how to find her voice, with the help of a teacher who never gave up.
It was a very compelling story, impossible for me to put down. I would definitely recommend this book for everyone. It puts things into perspective, and reminds you of the many things in your life, which are constantly taken for granted. This story also proves, that once again, determination and persistence can pay off. Everyone should be so lucky, as to have someone like Annie there to help you find your own voice.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A touching story of people losing hope, except a teacher..., Nov. 17 2002
By 
Melanie Wicwar (Raleigh, NC United States) - See all my reviews
I read The Miracle Worker on my own as a class assignment, and I am very glad I chose it. It was a very touching story of how Annie Sullivan helped Helen Keller out of the silence by teaching her how to do sign language. It was almost like a journey, watching all the events that Annie had to conquer while teaching Helen. Annie was a brave, young woman who was also half-blind. In short...I found this a wonderful, and most rewarding story to read.
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4.0 out of 5 stars The Miracle Worker Book Review, Nov. 13 2002
By 
Drew Smead (Averill Park, NY USA) - See all my reviews
The book The Miracle Worker by William Gibson is written exceptionally. It is about Helen Keller (def/blind child) and how she is taught how to communicate.
Her teacher was a woman named Annie Sullivan. The story is told from Annie's view in the first person. Throughout the book Annie tries different methods of teaching Helen how to communicate. Finally, one method of hers works. At this point Helen understands that objects have names. By memorizing the hand motions (sign language) previously Helen knows the names for everything.
Because Helen can't talk, hear or see William Gibson describes everything she does in great detail. This gives the reader many visuals in their mind while they are reading. You can almost see Helen feeling things and you can also get a picture in your mind of what she looks like. At the beginning of the book, we don't really know what to think of Helen and Annie because of some of their actions. Helen as anyone could imagine is not well behaved and is a mess. Annie is very strict with Helen and other than getting very upset when Helen disobeys her she is a pretty quiet person. However, as the book goes on we learn to love both of these characters because we understand where they are coming from.
I would strongly recommend reading this book to gain a greater appreciation for the lives of Helen Keller and Annie Sullivan.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A welcome addition to the cyberpunk genre, June 25 2002
By 
Shantell Powell "The ShanMonster" (Kitchener, ON, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Miracle Worker (Paperback)
The Miracle Worker is the astonishing tale of a blind and deaf cypherpunk named Helen who overcomes her disabilities with the help of a chopshop worker-turned-doctor named Anne. Helen lost her sight and hearing in a hacking session gone horribly wrong. She flatlines, but Anne brings her back from certain death.
After a lot of soul-searching, Helen is able to netrun once again. Anne develops specialized wetware, turning Helen into a cyborg.
Helen's first interactions with Black ICE in this new form are nailbitingly tense. It's only with the help of Anne that Helen is able to confront her own personal daemons.
The Miracle Worker is a welcome addition to the cyberpunk genre, and I highly recommend it. William Gibson is to be commended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Best!, April 21 2002
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This review is from: The Miracle Worker (Paperback)
I read Miracle Worker in class with my classmates and teacher. I find Miracle Worker a very touching story, about Helen Keller and Annie Sulliven. Some of the other characters are: Captain Keller, his wife Katie and his son, Helen's half brother, James. In the beggining of the book, Helen is a wild animal, but we see how this all changes, with Annie's help. By looking at Helen's actions throughout the book, we see what a great mind Helen has, and if she knew how to speak she would have tons to say. It is a very good book
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5.0 out of 5 stars Miracle Worker, April 9 2002
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This review is from: The Miracle Worker (Paperback)
I love Miracle worker b/c it is thoughtful & fun to read. I reccomend this book to people who have a vivid imagination
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent real, vivid play!!!!, Feb. 27 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Miracle Worker (Paperback)
Fantastic play!!!! The real suffering of everyone involved is sooo real! It's inspiring because it details the struggle to overcome serious handicaps. Annie is my absolute favorite character. I love the scenes with her & despite her own set of problems, like being blind herself & having terrible flashbacks & nightmares about her horrifying childhood, she gets her heart into getting Helen in touch with the world. Anne is one courageous lady!!! Even though I hear she was very modest about her accomplishments, Anne still deserves the honor of being remembered as the miracle worker of all time. I love how she persisted even though the rest of the Kellers were just content to have Helen "trained." Anne wanted Helen to be free to live like a real independent human being & it's so touching how she became attached to the little girl even though Helen was VERY difficult to handle, knocking out two of Annie's teeth & locking her in the room, then later battling with her at the breakfast table. And through it all, poor Annie struggles with trachoma hurting her eyes as well as being haunted by the death of her brother James. Of course, having James Keller around to make stupid remarks doesn't help either & I often felt like telling him to shut up. I get the feeling that there was a real power struggle between Arthur Keller & Anne too. I think Kate wanted to stand by Anne, but was didn't want to oppose her husband, whom along with everyone else, called him "Captain." I mentally cheered inside when Anne gets a chance to be alone with Helen, then later when she finally gets through to Helen about language! Anne really worked hard for that & I get the feeling that even though Kate & Arthur fell all over her thanking her at first because she'd "tamed" Helen, I read that later they really didn't appreciate Anne going the extra mile for them & teaching Helen to be independent & that's too bad because they really missed out on what Annie could have taught THEM and brought to their lives. Here's to you, Anne Sullivan!
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Miracle Worker, Dec 6 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Miracle Worker (Paperback)
The Miracle Worker was a great and inspirational story.
This is one of my favorite books to read. The story tells of a young, blind, deaf girl who doesn't understand the ways of life or how to communicate with others. Her family is hopeles in teaching her, but do not want to send her away in fear of what will happen to her. Helen's family then hears of a women who can help her, Anne Sullivan. They ask if she can come to teach Helen. Anne trys to teach Helen, but Helen has already taught herself how to act, and is unwilling to learn from anyone else. Well, Anne was not going to give up on her as easily as the rest of Helen's family. Anne wanted Helen to know what all the things around her meant, and not see them as dark and quiet as they appeared. Unfortunately, Anne was not able to teach Helen as well as she wanted to with Helen's whole family around, she needed to be alone with her for as long as possible. So Anne took Helen to a countryside house to start her private lessons. As for the rest of the story you have to read it for yourself.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An imprisoned mind set free, Oct. 28 2001
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This review is from: The Miracle Worker (Paperback)
"The Miracle Worker," a play by William Gibson, has had an enduring presence as a piece of living literature. It appeared on Broadway during the 1959-60 dramatic season, was made into a motion picture a couple of years later, and then was remade as a television movie for the 1979-80 season. The play's genesis lies in the real story of Helen Keller (1880-1968), the woman who was struck deaf and blind by illness at the age of 19 months. "The Miracle Worker" tells how a young Helen was led out of her prison of silence and darkness by the remarkable Anne Sullivan, who set out to teach the girl sign language.
"The Miracle Worker" is a truly great play. Gibson brilliantly takes the historical facts of Keller's childhood (many of which can be found in "The Story of My Life," Keller's 1902 autobiography) and turns them into a suspenseful, profoundly moving piece of theater. Although the core of the play is the fiery relationship between Sullivan and the wildly undisciplined Helen, Gibson's drama takes in the entire Keller household. I was particularly moved by the relationship between "Miss Annie" and Helen's frustrated but devoted mother.
"The Miracle Worker" is remarkable because much of the story is told not in dialogue, but in Gibson's stage directions. This is one of those plays which is not only powerful in performance, but also a gripping read.
Gibson's play is one of those great examples of a drama that takes real American life stories and turns them into enduring art; in that sense, it is comparable to such great works as "The Crucible," by Arthur Miller, or "The Night Thoreau Spent in Jail," by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee.
"The Miracle Worker" is not only a compelling human drama, but also a reflection on courage, love, education, and the transcendent power of language. As an interesting complementary text, I recommend Octavia Butler's science fiction story "Speech Sounds" (which can be found in Butler's book "Bloodchild and Other Stories").
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The Miracle Worker
The Miracle Worker by William Gibson (Paperback - March 26 2010)
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