Customer Reviews


89 Reviews
5 star:
 (71)
4 star:
 (11)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:
 (2)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


5.0 out of 5 stars Useful common practices
Already having considerable experience as a professional programmer mostly from system level software, I started out my new job as a database programmer with little to no previous hands-on Perl experience at a company unit where Perl was the commonly used tool for various data collecting and manipulation tasks, which compelled me to learn Perl very rapidly. After...
Published on Oct. 3 2003 by yorkaturr

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars Highly overrated...
When I first looked at this book, it seemed like a good idea. Perl is sufficiently arcane for there to be lot's of simple solutions that will not be immediately obvious. However, the book has two major faults. It is too thick, and it is too specific.
What I had hoped for was something like "Design Patterns", but for Perl. But instead of trying to...
Published on Sept. 29 2002 by gammel-Jo


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

4.0 out of 5 stars Perl Cookbook: Nutritious and Delicious, Dec 31 2003
This review is from: Perl Cookbook (Paperback)
I love Perl. I am almost obsessed with it. I have even left love messages for my wife in the mirror written in the best Perl I can manage. That's not to say that I am a Perl expert--not by any means. I think I shall forever remain a student as there is always more to learn. I am always searching for the latest Perl tidbit and I usually turn first to an O'Reilly book. One of the latest publications to come from O'Reilly on the subject of Perl is the second edition of the Perl Cookbook. Five years have passed since the last edition was published and a lot has changed in that short time span.
For those of you looking to improve your physique without leaving your desk, you'll find hefting this latest edition better suited to the task. It's about 200 pages thicker and about 543 pounds heavier. Okay, so the weight is an exaggeration. There are 80 new recipes (and two new chapters) covering technologies such as Unicode, XML and mod_perl. Even if you own a copy of the first edition, you will find the new recipes and the updated recipes of great value.
For those of you unfamiliar The Perl Cookbook, you will discover a rich treasure trove of excellent solutions to vexing problems. While the Perl Cookbook won't teach you the basics of Perl, beginners can benefit from not having to reinvent the wheel for addressing common tasks such as sorting, traversing, printing or deleting hashes. Advanced Perl Mongers may find the updated discussion on process management, object orientation and module creation enlightening.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Useful common practices, Oct. 3 2003
By 
"yorkaturr" (Helsinki, Finland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Perl Cookbook (Paperback)
Already having considerable experience as a professional programmer mostly from system level software, I started out my new job as a database programmer with little to no previous hands-on Perl experience at a company unit where Perl was the commonly used tool for various data collecting and manipulation tasks, which compelled me to learn Perl very rapidly. After digesting the Perl syntax from "Programming Perl", I picked up this book and was instantly able to code a reporting utility by referencing this book whenever I encountered a problem I didn't know the Perl solution for, such as smart ways for processing user input or even rounding floating point numbers.
Eventually I've read this book a few times from cover to cover and learned various common practices that I repeatedly, and successfully, apply in my day-to-day programming tasks, and some of the stuff in this book is even applicable to various other environments.
A recommended read for people who prefer to learn Perl by doing, and you just might add some tricks up your sleeve even if Perl isn't your primary interest.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Every Perl programmer should have it, Nov. 10 2002
In the past, I've had a bad experience with Cookbook-styles. One example would be a "CGI/Perl Cookbook". But this one is nothing like its counterpart.
To be able to follow the cookbook, you're expected to have a basic knowledge of Perl, Perl data structures and IO filehandles. The rest is "in order to get there, do like this, because of that" - style. Very easy to follow, very concise and at the same time informative. What you will appreciate the most of this book is, it doesn't just give you a solution, but it also teaches you the solution.
The book consists of 20 chapters, each chapter dedicated to a distinct subject, such as Strings, Numbers, Dates and Times, Arrays, Hashes, Pattern Matching, File access, File Contends and so on. Each chapter, consists of smaller sections, called "Receipts". Each receipt is dedicated to a solution of one commonly encountered real-life problem.
For example, Receipt 8.6, "Picking a Random Line from a File" introduces the problem , gives a very elegant solution: "rand($.) < 1 && ($line=$_) while <>", and provides a one page exciting description of the algorithm, followed by references.
Although I've been involved in Perl extensively for the last 3 years, I still catch myself skimming through the receipts to compare my solutions to that of the book. Frequently I end up discovering something new and exciting.
The book is definitely of value. Any Perl programmer should have it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1.0 out of 5 stars Highly overrated..., Sept. 29 2002
When I first looked at this book, it seemed like a good idea. Perl is sufficiently arcane for there to be lot's of simple solutions that will not be immediately obvious. However, the book has two major faults. It is too thick, and it is too specific.
What I had hoped for was something like "Design Patterns", but for Perl. But instead of trying to generalize, this book tries to list every specific problem that the beginning Perl programmer is likely to meet. For that reason it is unreadable. Any real insight is bound to get hidden in between dozens of trivial tasks. And when you actually meet some problem you think would be a good idea to look up, it is unlikely to be exactly the same as the authors envisioned (why not simply write a library instead?).
With the general incompetence level in the IT-sector during the dot-com bubble, it is possible this book needed to exist, but today it seems like a monument of stupidity, a useless reference that will catch dust forever.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The book every Perl programmer should own, March 19 2002
By 
Classic Style Seeker (Boston, MA United States) - See all my reviews
More books like these should be written for all popular languages. This is by far the most used book for me when I started to learn and program using Win32 Perl. I've not run into any problems with programming in the Win32 environment with this book. The second most used book is "Perl in a Nutshell," also by O'Reilly. But if there's a problem I have, I reach for this book first. 700+ pages packed with solutions and explanations of those solutions to many common problems. Most of the time, you'll find something in there to get you started if it doesn't solve your problem outright. There are whole sections for solving problems with:
Strings
Numbers
Date and Times
Arrays
Hashes
Pattern Matching
File Access
File Contents
Directories
Subroutines
References and Records
Packages, Libraries and Modules
Classes, Objects and Ties
Database Access
User Interface
Process AManagement and Communication
Sockets
Internet Services
CGI Programming
Web Automation
That's 20 sections in all! Get the book and stop suffering while looking for answers to your Perl problems. This book easily saved a month's worth of my time during a 4 month project. Plus, it saved me from writing inefficient code simply because I was new to the language and didn't know the tricks that can be used for such a wonderful language.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A bit like Meyers, perhaps, March 2 2001
By 
"ikallion" (Helsinki, Finland) - See all my reviews
Coming from C++ to Perl, I consider this book as quite excellent.
It has a bit of same 'feeling' than Meyers's 'Efective C++' (At least the 1992 edition) but the overall structure is more concrete.
After mastering the 'Lama' and 'Camel' I have a feeling that this is actually the book that gets the things together. If you learn from examples of code, like I do, this book is for you.
However, a caution. THIS IS NOT THE FIRST BOOK YOU SHOULD READ ABOUT PERL. No way. For that, read the 'Lama' and then 'Camel'. But after mastering the basics in those books, on the level that you do not need to peek for books to implement common tasks, then go for this.
Also, I consider this book much more practical than Orwant's, Hietaniemi's etc. 'Mastering Algorithms in Perl'. However, to be honest, after the faculty of computer science of Helsinki University (YES. The home of Linux, among other things) removed the cumlaude course for Perl I just might have a little grudge against the faculty (Not against Hietaniemi, however, the keeper of CPAN and the designated lecturer of Helsinki's Perl course).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A bit like Meyers, perhaps, March 2 2001
By 
"ikallion" (Helsinki, Finland) - See all my reviews
Coming from C++ to Perl, I consider this book as quite excellent.
It has a bit of same 'feeling' than Meyers's 'Efective C++' (At least the 1992 edition) but the overall structure is more concrete.
After mastering the 'Lama' and 'Camel' I have a feeling that this is actually the book that gets the things together. If you learn from examples of code, like I do, this book is for you.
However, a caution. THIS IS NOT THE FIRST BOOK YOU SHOULD READ ABOUT PERL. No way. For that, read the 'Lama' and then 'Camel'. But after mastering the basics in those books, on the level that you do not need to peek for books to implement common tasks, then go for this.
Also, I consider this book much more practical than Orwant's, Hietaniemi's etc. 'Mastering Algorithms in Perl'. However, to be honest, after the faculty of computer science of Helsinki University (YES. The home of Linux, among other things) removed the cumlaude course for Perl I just might have a little grudge against the faculty (Not against Hietaniemi, however, the keeper of CPAN and the designated lecturer of Helsinki's Perl course).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Most useful Perl book in existence, Feb. 2 2001
By 
This is my favourite Perl book. Read the first two sections of Programming Perl, any section that deals with references, skim the rest, and start browsing the Perl Cookbook. The presentation of the varied problems and their solutions is wonderful and instructive. Most programming professors in college are neither as good at instruction, nor as pragmaticly helpful. If all you want is a book to swipe code from, don't bother; most of the book will be just extra weight. All the free code you want is on the net.
Get this book, but get this book because with each problem and solution set is a discussion of why the solution works, other solutions that are possible, and when to look toward a more robust and/or complex answer. Each chapter has ten or twenty pages that are dedicated to the programming bailiwick the chapter explores. The answers are well commented, and syntatic suggar is explained. The writing is not terribly dense, and a good sense of flow is maintained through out the book. This is one of the few technical books I own that I can just sit down and read for hours on end w/o getting bored or loosing steam.
I cannot praise this book enough. My copy is dog-eared, looks like it's been through a bad land war in SE Asia, and has tiny yellow post-its with titles marking sections I found particularly interesting or useful. With The Perl Cookbook, Programming Perl, Effective Perl Programming, Advanced Perl Programming, and Mastering Regular Expression (ack.), there are few situations a programmer can't handle. Buy this book, NOW!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Useful both to explain Perl concepts and to solve problems, Dec 26 1999
By 
Mike Christie (Cold Spring Harbor, NY, USA) - See all my reviews
The "Perl Cookbook" condenses into code algorithms that are both beautiful and helpful. Paired with the "Programming Perl" book, which despite problems of organization is undoubtedly the best Perl reference, the cookbook is simply indispensible for both the serious Perl programmer and anyone who wishes to learn how to write Perl naturally.
Every language has a natural idiom; even COBOL. Perl, having convenience so strongly in its genesis, is not very similar to its predecessors in many ways, and along with solutions to individual problems what one learns from the cookbook is how a Perl programmer would write such a program. You learn twice reading these answers: not only how to solve your problem (how do you read a file line by line in reverse? how do you trap signals in your program?) but also what the natural idioms are which both simplify your code and make clearer to you how Perl works.
I reviewed "Programming Perl" and had reservations about it: I have none about this book. It is not a reference to solve all your questions about the language--buy "Programming Perl" for that. It is not a tutorial--for that, get "Learning Perl". What it is is a distillation of some smart people's work in Perl; well-explained, clearly laid out, and highly informative in every area a programmer is likely to work in. Buy it if you love Perl.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Several years of experience in several hundred pages, Dec 12 1999
Sometimes I think either Tim O'Reilly or Tom Christiansen knows what I am thinking.
In the past week alone, I can count half a dozen times I have wondered about ways to do things in Perl, and never once have I failed to get either a full solution or a running start from the information in this book. If you have read Learning Perl by Christiansen and Schwartz (and if you haven't, you probably should before tackling this one), then this is your next step on the road to Perl.
This book contains hundreds of examples of solutions to "How do I..." type problems using Perl. Ranging from core language topics like hashes, sorting, and string and array processing, to files, database access, IPC, and brief but useful sections on Web and CGI usage, there is something here for everyone who does things with Perl.
Each chapter contains at least a dozen 'recipes' for solving a particular problem in a particular context. Each recipe is neatly laid out with a brief description of the problem, a proposed solution, and a follow-up discussion section. I especially appreciated the discussions, as they maintain the plurality of Perl--the proposed solutions work, but the discussion area almost invariably also includes alternate approaches or techniques. That's the beauty of Perl (and its motto)--There's More Than One Way To Do It. This book offers the intermediate programmer years of experience in solving real world problems using Perl in a few hundred, easy to read pages.
If you have learned enough about Perl to get started, the next thing you should do is get this book. So get cooking!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 29 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Perl Cookbook
Perl Cookbook by Nathan Torkington (Paperback - Aug. 31 2003)
CDN$ 77.95 CDN$ 32.92
Usually ships in 1 to 2 months
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews