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5.0 out of 5 stars A must have book
I saw this book in a LEAN conference training and among a large amount of business books related to business management , this one oriented CEO approach is one of the best books i read in my life. It's a life-changing book that will surely help you reach high management jobs.
Published on April 30 2012 by Alain

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Standard business consulting verbiage
I was hoping that this was a down-to-earth book with interesting and useful ideas like Built to Last or No Excuses Management. Alas, it's just a standard, boring, fluffy business book filled with many more words that are called for. It might be worth reading if you're stuck on an airplane with it.
Published on July 16 2004 by John Lacey


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Standard business consulting verbiage, July 16 2004
By 
John Lacey (San Luis Obispo, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done (Hardcover)
I was hoping that this was a down-to-earth book with interesting and useful ideas like Built to Last or No Excuses Management. Alas, it's just a standard, boring, fluffy business book filled with many more words that are called for. It might be worth reading if you're stuck on an airplane with it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A must have book, April 30 2012
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This review is from: Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done (Hardcover)
I saw this book in a LEAN conference training and among a large amount of business books related to business management , this one oriented CEO approach is one of the best books i read in my life. It's a life-changing book that will surely help you reach high management jobs.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A BOOK YOU MUST READ, Oct. 24 2003
By 
Shashank Tripathi (Gadabout) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done (Hardcover)
It is a common fallacy of business, especially big companies, that the management does those in-the-sky thingies like relationship management, strategy development, hobnobbing with the big tykes etc (depending on which industry the firm is in.) The reality is, most "leaders" think they don't have to roll up their sleeve and "execute". They believe their buck stops at "strategizing".
At the end of the day, you bet on people, not on strategies. Strategies are intellectually simple; their execution is not simple. The question is, can you execute? That's what differentiates one company from another.
I thought this book would be about doozy ideas rehashed to be a "business book". But I found the book a common sensical narrative of HOW the executives mentioned (from AT&T, GE, Colgate-Palmolive, J&J etc -- some more successful than others) actually managed their delivery and ascent.
Brilliant book. Simply, fluently written. You can finish in the course of a laid-back Sunday afternoon lunch.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, Aug. 16 2002
This review is from: Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done (Hardcover)
This book was recommended by a friend. I was very disappointed. Every chapter, I kept thinking, "Well, Duh!" Anybody who's been in business for more than two years already knows this stuff. I showed it to my boss, someone I consider a paragon of execution, and he basically said the same thing.
I find books on coaching, communications and language, listening skills, psychology, teamwork, sales, NLP and the learning organization much more useful. One I particularly like is "Games Business Experts Play". "Execution" will tell you *that* you need to close the knowing-doing gap. "Games Business Experts Play" will teach you *how* to close it.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent - As far as it goes, Jan. 22 2004
By 
Timothy Pierce (Littleton, Co United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done (Hardcover)
Execution is a fresh of breath air, especially after reading so many business books about 'vision', where the entire book is all 'vision' and no 'substance'. The two authors of the book do know something about creating realistic plans, linking actual operational considerations with goals for achievement, and getting down to a real rubber-meets-the-road approach to planning. In fact, the later chapters about creating strategic plans and tying those plans to the operating plan and budget in a realistic manner are, in my opinion, by far the best the book has to offer, and make the book well worth the read.
Where I wish they had broadened the scope of the book is to cover effective execution at lower layers of the corporate hierarchy - almost the entire book takes place at, and really applies to, the CEO/EVP/VP level of fortune 500 companies. It rarely if ever covers strategies that work for managers of smaller busines units or groups, or who work in smaller companies. In both cases, the strategies in this book, while still being valuable as theory, lose their practical value. It becomes clear as you read the book that the authors have no real experience with those levels/companies, and I think the book suffers for it.
Overall, I think this book is worth the read, but I can't bring myself to give it five stars.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars good, but not great, Jan. 15 2006
By A Customer
This review is from: Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done (Hardcover)
This book does a good job of identifying the processes involved in executing strategy. A real plus of the book is the considerable experience that both authors bring to the table. One negative aspect is the extensive use of "storytelling" by the two authors. While some of these antedotes are useful, many having the feeling of "I told you so's". While I would recommend this book, I certainly wouldn't tailor my organizations strategy around it.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The book that Jack should have written., July 9 2004
This review is from: Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done (Hardcover)
This is perhaps one of the best business books I have ever read. Unlike many books which use extensive academia and complex formulas which rarely see the light of day or work well outside of a controlled environment, this book is simple. That said this simplicity can be a bit deceiving. When I worked for GE, as did Bossidy and Jack Welch, the concepts which turned that business into a global leader in industry were remarkably simple. It wasn't the simplicity of the ideas, but rather the ability to get a hundred thousand people executing flawlessly on them that makes the difference.
In the book Bossidy describes how he personally would ensure execution occurs within his businesses. Start with the right people. Too many times we assume people are merely interchangeable cogs, but great business leaders who get results know differently. Chapter 5 discusses the responsibility and focus required to ensure the right people are in the right jobs. Even as a CEO he spent up to 40% of his time on developing and hiring the right people.
Another interesting aspect is the ability to speak directly and level set expectations and have a firm grasp on reality, regardless of how painful that reality may be at the time. Throughout the book is example after example that illustrates the value of direct conversation and clear feedback and communication. As you read the book, look for not only the content of what is discussed, but how it is discussed. Nearly always the method is to truly listen and engage people in a dialog which will set expectations, and ensure misunderstandings or mixed messages are limited. This allows people to focus on what needs to be done instead of being distracted with politics and other non value added issues.
While some may see the content as too simplistic, those same people are usually unable to deliver results in the same manner as Bossidy did at GE, or Honeywell. The value of this book is both in content and style.
The book itself is never dry, is easy to read, flows smoothly in conversational format, and is highly engaging. Highly recommended to anyone in a business situation who wants to improve execution and results.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The discipline to execute, Aug. 6 2005
This review is from: Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done (Hardcover)
With all of the competing priorities in the business world today, I often find myself struggling to do everything that I plan. This is a very well-written business book that considers this specific challenge and lays out a roadmap to success. It was very helpful and I recommend it highly.
"The Emotional Intelligence Quick Book" is another title I recommend for this same challenge.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Tips for the CEOs and Group Heads of Large Conglomerates, June 12 2003
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(#1 HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done (Hardcover)
Larry Bossidy is clearly a five-star leader, and Ram Charan is a gifted consultant and teacher. It surprised me that their book didn't work as well as I had hoped.
Execution's title confused me. Hopefully, you won't have that problem. I thought Execution would be all about how to take a strategy and operating plan and implement them well. Instead, Part III makes it clear that Execution is about meeting overall financial objectives through being an effective organization in setting strategies and operating plans to serve customers well while building an organization that can implement the plans for outperforming competitors. Part I, by contrast, makes it sound like Execution is only about implementation, noting that almost all organizations have the same strategies (or can quickly get them from consultants), access the same top talent and can easily acquire and employ competitively effective innovation.
I also thought Execution would apply to all business people. Instead, the context for most of the AlliedSignal (Honeywell International's name when Mr. Bossidy became CEO there the first time) and General Electric examples which dominate the book is that of the CEO or group executive to whom divisions report in a large conglomerate. In this sense, Execution is like reading the latter chapters of Mr. Welch's book, Jack.
The main difference between Jack and Execution is that Execution tries to build a framework for the book's concepts while sharing examples (mostly of failure) from other organizations. Mr. Charan's sections of the book mostly focus on that positioning. Mr. Bossidy mostly tells about his own experiences at AlliedSignal and Honeywell. Mr. Bossidy, of course, worked with Mr. Welch at General Electric for many years. Mr. Bossidy reports that you could take execution for granted at GE, but that it was lacking at AlliedSignal when he arrived. The two coauthors alternate in providing long monologues on the chapter topics and subtopics.
Three aspects of Execution are valuable to almost any business leader: how to hold a strategy review (chapter 8), building an organization (chapter 5) and the "Dear Jane" letter to a new leader (conclusion).
For those who would like to become CEOs and heads of divisions of large, disparate organizations, Mr. Bossidy's many anecdotes from his experiences at Honeywell International about how to do the leader's job will provide a valuable model that can be used repeatedly. In many such organizations, there are no good leadership examples and this book can help fill the gap.
Here's the book's structure:
Part I: Why Execution Is Needed
Chapter 1. The Gap Nobody Knows
Chapter 2. The Execution Difference
Part II: The Building Blocks of Execution
Chapter 3. Building Block One: The Leader's Seven Essential Behaviors
Chapter 4. Building Block Two: Creating the Framework for Cultural Change
Chapter 5. Building Block Three: The Job No Leader Should Delegate -- Having the Right People in the Right Place
Part III: The Three Core Processes of Execution
Chapter 6. The People Process: Making the Link with Strategy and Operations
Chapter 7. The Strategy Process: Making the Link with People and Operations
Chapter 8. How to Conduct a Strategy Review
Chapter 9. The Operations Process: Making the Link with Strategy and People
Conclusion: Letter to a New Leader
Execution addresses these problems. First, many company and division heads have little knowledge about the businesses or the most important functions and processes needed to prosper. Boards, for example, often bring in a brilliant person who has performed as a "role player" elsewhere, and they cannot scale up into the CEO job. When a company has had poor leadership, its processes and organization also become weak and it's hard to get anything done. There are several poignant examples including Richard Thoman at Xerox and Richard McGinn at Lucent Technologies. It's hard to fix that problem. It took years at AlliedSignal and can be quickly lost (which happened in the two years after he retired the first time). That's why Mr. Bossidy had to come back to restore execution (as he means it) at Honeywell International. Lacking these perspectives, the business system is misdirected (see The Fifth Discipline).
Second, many leaders make bad assumptions about their circumstances. Acting on those assumptions makes matters worse.
Third, companies plan to pursue strategies for which they lack the processes and organizations to implement. The strategies need to match the ability to execute.
As a solution, you as leader must:
"--Know your people and your business
--Insist on realism
--Set clear goals and priorities
--Follow through
--Reward the doers
--Expand people's capabilities
--Know yourself."
I was uncomfortable with many of the examples. The unending praise of Dick Brown at EDS didn't seem to make any sense knowing that EDS's stock melted down and he was asked to leave. He was in big trouble when Execution was written, having encouraged his people to grow by taking on large unprofitable new accounts. It seems like he might have been executing the wrong strategy, one that couldn't be executed. Most of the "failure" examples are anonymous which makes them less credible and less compelling. Finally, Dell is heralded for executing very well (which it certainly does). However, in describing how the company has evolved its business model to outperform competitors, Execution fails to notice that its business model innovation has been essential to success. No competitor has this business model. Execution's assumption that everyone can have the same strategy ignores research that shows that business model innovation creates unique strategies and superior execution compared to making the old business model and strategy more efficient.
Unless you are shooting to be CEO of GE or Honeywell International, I suspect that you would do better to read Good to Great for getting ideas related to improving effectiveness.
After you finish this book, ask yourself what one thing you could improve would make the most difference in your organization's performance over the next week, month, quarter, year and three years.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must for serious business officers, July 12 2004
By 
"herve58" (Paris, France) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done (Hardcover)
The principles of the book helped us move our stock from $1 to $6 in 2 years. I not only like the book, I now use it as a tool for my consulting business. It helps focusing on the essential and provides a template for structuring a business for success. I believe that it can be adapted to any venture.
I recommend it because of its simplicity and connection to reality. If you have managed operations, you will appreciate this down-to-earth layout of how to steadily drive your business or evaluate another business. Use that approach and you are above 99% of the business crowd out there. I am grateful.
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Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done
Execution: The Discipline of Getting Things Done by Ram Charan (Hardcover - June 4 2002)
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