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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, excellent
If there is a better police procedural crime novel, I've missed it. I approached this book with some misgivings, having been disappointed by "Chasing the Dime." But Henry (Hieronymous--I liked that little touch) Bosch is a first-class, believable detective, all the way. He's jaded to some degree but tries to maintain some touch with the populace. The us-them...
Published on July 19 2004 by Roger Long

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3.0 out of 5 stars Skull Fractured Kids & Pretty Girl Suicides
"City of Bones" was the first book I've read by this author. Connelly did create a great page burner. The chapters are short, the vocabulary is easy as we zip through the tale.
For me, the best character was Dr. William Golliher who examines the bones and projects that the victim suffered many fractures and repeated abuse over a long period of time. He...
Published on May 3 2004 by Lee Armstrong


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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, excellent, July 19 2004
By 
Roger Long "longrush" (Port Clinton, OH USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: City of Bones (Hardcover)
If there is a better police procedural crime novel, I've missed it. I approached this book with some misgivings, having been disappointed by "Chasing the Dime." But Henry (Hieronymous--I liked that little touch) Bosch is a first-class, believable detective, all the way. He's jaded to some degree but tries to maintain some touch with the populace. The us-them relationship police have with the press and the "looky loos," as civilians are called, is there, certainly, but outwardly subdued.
The plot feels right, enhanced by the fact that the writer didn't try to tie up all the loose ends, such as, the surprising matter of Julia Brasher and, not to give too much away, the fact that the killer is not at all a sure thing when we reach the final page. Not all killers confess into a tape recorder and psychoanalyze their own motives.
Bosch makes mistakes. He goes down dead-end trails after false clues. He is imperfect. In short, he is realistic. So are the other characters, including his partner, the technicians, Bosch's superiors in the department, the suspects, the incidental personae--the entire cast. They don't always do what we expect, but people in real life don't either. Too many books have characters who appear to be "on rails." We know exactly where they are going and how the plot is going to follow them.
I realize I haven't outlined the plot, but others have, and sometimes they give away too much. Suffice it to say that I'll read more of the Harry Bosch series and hope for books that are in this same class.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I Was Up All Night Reading This Book -I Wasn't Disappointed, May 13 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: City of Bones (Hardcover)
I picked up this book after reading an article about the author in the New York Times. I couldn't put the book down and finished it in two days. Unlike some authors who write about LA and put Downey next to LAX, Mr. Connelly's Southern California is accurate. The little bits of ambience he throws in ---Philippe's sandwiches, farmer's market donuts --are pleasant, but you don't have to be an Angeleno to enjoy his work. With the exception of the Julia Brasher character (I couldn't figure out what was going on there), I enjoyed each of the people I met in the book, from the stars to the bit-players. Little vignettes, like the auditioning LA police officers, the SID scientist who was an avid skateboarder, the anthropologist at the Page Museum who could read a person's history in their bones, the retired doctor, made the book come alive. I'm looking forward to reading more of this author's works.
I also want to thank the people who write reviews. I read them in order to decide whether I will enjoy a book or not. I'm not a professional book person by any means, but by adding my voice, I hope that I can help someone decide whether this is a book for their tastes.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Skull Fractured Kids & Pretty Girl Suicides, May 3 2004
By 
Lee Armstrong (Winterville, NC United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: City of Bones (Hardcover)
"City of Bones" was the first book I've read by this author. Connelly did create a great page burner. The chapters are short, the vocabulary is easy as we zip through the tale.
For me, the best character was Dr. William Golliher who examines the bones and projects that the victim suffered many fractures and repeated abuse over a long period of time. He offers the only real character depth as his faith in a Higher Power is challenged by the brutality shown by the evidence. Unfortunately, his time in the novel is quite brief and not very affecting to detective Harry Bosch. I found it interesting that Bosch is named after the painter Heironymous Bosch whose fantastic religious imagery offers some of the greatest artistic puzzles. However, Detective Bosch does not believe in a Higher Power; his motivations are humanitarian.
The second most interesting aspect was Bosch's romance with Julia Brasher. Unfortunately, we never really come to get a grip on what makes her tick. Did she have an accident or was she a pretty girl with a death wish? For some fleeting chapters, we think Bosch may find personal happiness, but it's not to be. His exit at the end after pages of recitation about dedication to the job left me puzzled. How the novel built to that final act remains undetected.
The most interesting incident in the book is when the press-hungry Teresa Corazon gets locked in a port-a-potty. Now that could have been some great comic relief! Instead, Bosch seems to start and end in a state of depression. Many of the supporting characters were quite captivating from Dr. Guyot to all of the dysfunctional Delacroix family. In the end, "City of Bones" is like a fast meal that tastes good going down, but leaves one hungry for some substance. Caleb Carr's "The Alienist" was far more gripping for me. "CoB" is a definite maybe!
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Bosch series just gets better & better, April 23 2004
I've been reading the Bosch series from book #1 & on. Not one has disappointed me, including City of Bones.
In City of Bones Bosch is working on a case where human remains have been found after buried for nearly 20 years. This book is very fast paced and step by step through his detective processes, you find yourself not being able to put the book down. Trying to figure out, who did it and why. Another great aspect of this book is that some of the background players in the series, like his partner Edgar, are given time, the relationships developed more. Which is very satisfying for those who have been reading the series for years.
Overall, I loved the story and the twists and turns in the plot kept me guessing until the end. As always, I wasn't able to guess the ending. My only complaint is that I think the resolution of who murdered this person wasn't as good as it could have been. I don't want to give anything away, so you'll just have to read it! Do check out this book- but if you've never read the series before, I would recommend starting with the first book (The Black Echo) and working you way through, it's not necessary, but I think it's very worth it- as I said, they're all excellent reads!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant work, March 9 2004
By 
Larry (Tampa, Florida) - See all my reviews
A young child's humerus is found by a dog on a hillside in Hollywood. A closer search reveals a more complete skeleton. Harry Bosch and his partner Edgar are assigned this case in which the murder is believed to have occurred over twenty years ago. His investigation resurrects painful memories of a dysfunctional family while driving another to consider suicide. In the midst of the case, Bosch manages to possibly find love. Can any form of happiness last for this tortured soul?
Harry Bosch is the prototypical modern fictional crime fighter. He is a direct descendant of Chandler's Philip Marlowe and Hammett's Sam Spade. Bosch is today's dark knight, lone wolf or, to use Mike Connelly's simile, The Last Coyote. He is also the one of greatest creations in the history of crime fiction. Many of us have repeatedly extolled the virtues of the writing of Mike Connelly. He is simply the very best of today's fictional crime writers. Readers should take note of the incredibly smooth lyrical writing. There is much personal angst Bosch suffers and this is so well conveyed through dialogue and other characters. Los Angeles has never looked more bleak than in the pages of this brilliant book. With each successive work, Mike Connelly continuously raises the ante in reaching new levels of excellence. This work is no exception. Read it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting conclusion (sort of) to the series, Feb. 16 2004
By 
David W. Nicholas (Van Nuys, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Michael Connelly has been doing these Harry Bosch novels for some years now. Bosch is the stereotypical detective, and if anything that's always been my one main objection to him: he's a bit too much of a stereotype, right down to the jazz on the stereo, the chain-smoking (though he did finally quit), the casual attitude towards superiors, and the dogged determination to clear every one of his cases.
The current book follows Bosch and his partner, Jerry Edgar, as they look into what they at first imagine is a false alarm. A man walking his dog in the Hollywood Hills has let the dog run wild, and the pooch returned with a bone in his mouth, which the man thinks is human. This happens regularly, and the bone is usually from an animal, but this time the dog's owner happens to be a retired doctor, and he knows what he's talking about: it's human. Soon Harry and Jerry are working a twenty-year-old homicide, apparently a runaway who was killed, for what reason they don't know. They can't even make an identification. Then it turns out there's a convicted child molester on the street, and things begin to go sideways and get ugly at the same time.
Connelly has this sort of thing downpat now. The mystery's not the most surprising one he's done, and the plot is somewhat meandering, but the characterization of Bosch is well-done, and the other characters are interesting too. There are several strange twists in the plot, things that you weren't expecting, all of which aren't directly connected to the mystery of who killed the kid. The ending, which I won't reveal (though I guessed what was coming), is something of a mystery too, though the preview of his next book in the back told me where he was going to take things.
Anyway, I enjoyed this book, and would recommend it, though of course anyone reading something like this should first read some of the earlier books, so that they get some background on the characters in the story.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting conclusion (sort of) to the series, Feb. 16 2004
By 
David W. Nicholas (Montrose, Ca United States) - See all my reviews
Michael Connelly has been doing these Harry Bosch novels for some years now. Bosch is the stereotypical detective, and if anything that's always been my one main objection to him: he's a bit too much of a stereotype, right down to the jazz on the stereo, the chain-smoking (though he did finally quit), the casual attitude towards superiors, and the dogged determination to clear every one of his cases.
The current book follows Bosch and his partner, Jerry Edgar, as they look into what they at first imagine is a false alarm. A man walking his dog in the Hollywood Hills has let the dog run wild, and the pooch returned with a bone in his mouth, which the man thinks is human. This happens regularly, and the bone is usually from an animal, but this time the dog's owner happens to be a retired doctor, and he knows what he's talking about: it's human. Soon Harry and Jerry are working a twenty-year-old homicide, apparently a runaway who was killed, for what reason they don't know. They can't even make an identification. Then it turns out there's a convicted child molester on the street, and things begin to go sideways and get ugly at the same time.
Connelly has this sort of thing downpat now. The mystery's not the most surprising one he's done, and the plot is somewhat meandering, but the characterization of Bosch is well-done, and the other characters are interesting too. There are several strange twists in the plot, things that you weren't expecting, all of which aren't directly connected to the mystery of who killed the kid. The ending, which I won't reveal (though I guessed what was coming), is something of a mystery too, though the preview of his next book in the back told me where he was going to take things.
Anyway, I enjoyed this book, and would recommend it, though of course anyone reading something like this should first read some of the earlier books, so that they get some background on the characters in the story.
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5.0 out of 5 stars well-crafted, May 29 2003
By 
Sam C. Ogden (Tampa, Florida United States) - See all my reviews
After reading a few James Patterson novels, it is possible that any author could seem like a genious. However, I really did enjoy the reading of this book in its entirety. The one thing that I would like to point out here is that M. Connelly appears to be extremely talented in grafting out all of the facets in a story. The dialogue was intense enough so that you desired to be a part of the conversation, yet never was it too much. The same with detail. When the author described a particular setting, he was quick to give you what you needed to know. In other words, he did not ramble on for two pages about the appearance of one's house or computer (i.e. D. Koontz). And lastly, what goes on within the police force was brought together precisley so that even the simple reader can easily follow. This book is a definate reccomendation to all those that are tired of the same ol' myster writers that care more about culteralistic dialogue and more murders scenes than logical reasoning and reality.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Is it the end of the road for Bosch, May 18 2003
By A Customer
A woman's bones were found in the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles in 1914. It was determined that they were nine thousand years old, and anthropologists concluded that she was murdered.
I heard that it was this event, and an anthropological book about child abuse, that inspired Michael Connelly's latest murder mystery, City of Bones.
LAPD detective Harry Bosch is left with only the bones found in the Hollywood Hills to solve the "cold," 20-year-old case that will soon be closed regardless of if the killer is put to justice. It isn't until the bones are studied that he finds a personal connection that, according to Connelly, "...taps into Harry's sense of rage." Until then though, the murder seems like any other case, and the story seems like any other mystery.
Bosch struggles throughout the novel with his need and capability to find justice and make a difference in an evil world. Julia Brasher, a thirtyish rookie, helps Bosch with logical and true encouragements such as "...there will always be the need for heroes," but these views prove detrimental to Brasher and in turn to Bosch.
With many suspects and no hard evidence, Bosch is forced to go with his gut feeling numerous times, leading the case into many exciting and suspenseful twists and turns. But, nothing can compare to the shocking ending, leaving long time Bosch followers to wonder if this is the end, or a new beginning.
*I also realize that the next book is out, but i'm a little behind!
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4.0 out of 5 stars A sense of placement, May 4 2003
By 
Charles J. Marr (Cambridge Springs, Pa USA) - See all my reviews
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Connelly seems to be tying up loose ends in this novel ( the paperback teaser for his next shows why)with its sense of career completion. Harry makes a point of saying he is past the pension gateway, and the time span of the case - twenty year old bones- gives us a sense of time having passed. It's been a long time since Harry returned from Vietnam, which also comes up in the novel. Then too there is the finality of statements made by a number of the characters - the words one cannot take back- and a new road may be beckoning.
The plot turns on the tale the bones tell and the urban sprawl of Southern California which transforms snake infested canyons into subdevelopments and former wilderness into neighborhood back lots. As the city comes to find the bones, so this novel rambles out of the city in a number of directions, playing upon the theme of scattering of the past and the detectives' task of reassembling it. The double turn of the ending is nicely done. (I'm not really giving it away, when the case seems resolved and you are only half way through the novels sizeable heft you know complications are coming). This is a good read for any detective novel fan and well worth the money.
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City of Bones
City of Bones by Michael Connelly (School & Library Binding - March 2003)
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