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5.0 out of 5 stars It is very inspirational book
I am a experienced rower in CT and I love this book. My dad bought it for me. It talks about rowing in a philosophical way. Well, I like this book because it is saying rowing is a mental sport aswell as a physical one. It is! No one can question me on that point. I have been into rowing since I was 4 years old. My older brother rowed and I would go out into the launch...
Published on July 10 1999 by Sara Garlick

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2.0 out of 5 stars Godel, Escher, Bach meets Jonathan Livingston Seagull
I don't know when I've read a more unfortunately flawed book -- unfortunately, because while there are snippets of truly inspired writing in it, they are overwhelmed by too many examples of what Strunk and White have told us all not to do. The author, evidently a successful journalist, seems to lose all sense of restraint in the book-length format: pithiness is absent as...
Published on Oct. 3 2002 by Mary Malmros


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2.0 out of 5 stars Godel, Escher, Bach meets Jonathan Livingston Seagull, Oct. 3 2002
By 
Mary Malmros (Charlemont, MA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I don't know when I've read a more unfortunately flawed book -- unfortunately, because while there are snippets of truly inspired writing in it, they are overwhelmed by too many examples of what Strunk and White have told us all not to do. The author, evidently a successful journalist, seems to lose all sense of restraint in the book-length format: pithiness is absent as points are belabored to death; metaphors are piled three- and four-deep until all sense of the original subject is lost; and a sense of appropriate diction is tossed out the window in favor of florid, show-off vocabulary that causes the reader to wince in sympathetic embarrassment. Perhaps most telling, the author never seems to find an authentic voice. Compelling books on sports have been written from the perspective of both the insider and the outsider; Lambert seems to try for both, and is convincing as neither. He drops the names of rowing greats he has shared the river with, yet never seems to find his own place as a rower, the level at which he can simply put his head down and work at it without concern for what others are doing. Constantly fretting at his own inadequacies and questioning whether he has any right to consider himself a "real athlete", he articulates a series of vague goals that are best summed up as a desire not to be last -- or at least, not last by too much. The result, for the reader, is to end up wondering why Lambert is in this endeavor -- rowing or writing -- and if the author himself doesn't seem to know, why should the reader care?
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5.0 out of 5 stars It is very inspirational book, July 10 1999
I am a experienced rower in CT and I love this book. My dad bought it for me. It talks about rowing in a philosophical way. Well, I like this book because it is saying rowing is a mental sport aswell as a physical one. It is! No one can question me on that point. I have been into rowing since I was 4 years old. My older brother rowed and I would go out into the launch with the coach and get to tell him what to do. There I learned how to be a coach. I have been rowing for years. I row 2 seasons out of the year and run the other 2. At my high school we only have rowing in the spring and summer. I love the sport very much. This book is a GREAT book for rowers of all levels. So the next time you are about to do a race piece remember to relax your body not your mind. You need to keep your body relaxed even when you are start with a 36 and then your cox is telling you to do a power 30 at a 32, your legs are tired from the the start you did and your hands are bleeding because of the blisters on your hands. Yes, I have had the dreaded blisters. But after toughing my hands up instead of blisters I have calluses which are no better. Well, at least they don't hurt! HA!HA!HA! This book reminds me a whole lot of my summer coach, back to back '95(Finland) and '96(Scotland)lightweight women's pair world champion Ellen Minzner. It has really changed my mind about rowing, and now I row better because I have seen rowing through a different light. So I would recommend this book for rowers of all levels(club or world champions).
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5.0 out of 5 stars A funny, profound, exhilarating book, Dec 17 1998
By A Customer
This book is a gem: beautifully faceted, rarely found, and precious to keep. Craig Lambert is as skillful a wordsmith as he is a rower, and reading his intelligence at work on what it means--and what it takes--to master this sport is a delight. One of the pleasures of Mind Over Water is the way Lambert teases insight out of all aspects of rowing, as in his perfectly pitched meditation on balance in the section called "Equinox": "balance is no settled state: it is alive, dynamic, constantly emergent. Even those ideal moments when our boat sets up perfectly, flying across the water in silent, level splendor, only mean balance now. A second later, we must take the next stroke." Lambert is a transcendental rower, and he brings an Emersonian eye to the mind-body connection, as in this, one of my favorite passages: "The shell responds to motions of the body. The body follows the dictates of the mind. Hence the boat reacts to the rower's mind: when your mind quivers, so does your shell. . . . Conversely, a quiet mind levels the boat; stillness settles the body, and the shell, relaxing into agreement, takes the quietest, fastest route through the water." Lambert moves easily between the sublime and the prosaic, and when it's time to evoke the need to push the body to do more than it wants, he brings wit and humor to the task: "Don't tell me that this isn't the finish line, I think. This has got to be the finish line; I am already on my fourth wind and there is no way I can row another hundred feet, let alone another mile." And when he does finish, "I don't know about Tom [his rowing partner], but I have accomplished the impossible--several times over. Never mind that we were amazingly slow: we did it." Lambert has asked himself since childhood, Am I a real athlete? In other words, he's the perfect guide into the elemental and rarefied world of rowing. For those of us whose exercise regimes haven't been more ambitious than step classes, free weights, and weekend hikes, Lambert makes such a place accessible to the imagination. Mind Over Water is funny, profound, earthy, contemplative, even exhilarating. I highly recommend it.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Mind over water Lessons on life from the art of rowing, Dec 15 1999
By A Customer
Craig Lambert's Book 'Mind over water: Lessons on life from the art of rowing' attempts to explain how rowing can be a metaphor for life. 'attempts' being the key word there. Being a rower myself, I found that his ideas were so far fetched and in some cases I had no idea how they related to both life and the sport of rowing that we both share. I had to skip over many of the parts that were wordy, and it seems many of the paragraphs could be re-written to be half the length. I am not an english Major, but I did notice that he Author has not organized his thoughts very well. I found that one idea many times did not follow the next. Lambert included some unecessary bits of information such as where he played as a child, and much about his career as an adult. As much as I disliked Craig Lambert's book, he did at least use the correct rowing terminology. But all in all I would not reccomend ambert's book to my fellow crewmates.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An inspiration for any athlete, occasional or serious., Nov. 18 1998
By A Customer
This book is a joy on several levels. Lambert writes a moving and educational tribute to the great practitioners of rowing, a sport of ancient rhythms and timeless beauty, and illuminates a number of unique personalities from the sport. He also tells a tale of personal awakening through his own participation in the sport, and speaks for "everyman" as he describes his middle-aged struggles to achieve athletic grace. Lambert's dry wit and keen eye for detail create some unforgettable and often hilarious images! And on a third level, Lambert extracts many intriguing insigts about teamwork and personal discipline which readily apply for any of us in our daily lives, and in our greatest personal dreams. Well done, Craig! A compelling and ultimately joyful jewel of a book.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Educational and Wise, Nov. 16 1998
By A Customer
I thought Craig's book was a wonderful introduction to the sport of rowing. I am a parent of 3 children who are rowing. The book helped me understand their sport and their passion for it. I also run a business. The book makes wonderful analogies about the application of individual and group efforts to the overall success of any undertaking. Its a great book to pass around the office. Craig is very insightful in this book. After reading it you will want to take up the sport of rowing or at least better understand how the principles learned in rowing can be applied to the rest of your life. The book is short. It can be read quickly. But you will find yourself going back to reread many of the pages.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Book For Some, March 20 2004
By 
cmw1126@aol.com (Cambridge, MA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Mind Over Water: Lessons on Life from the Art of Rowing (Paperback)
I thoroughly enjoyed this book and its musings, although I suspect that much of my appreciation can be explained by my: (1) being about the same age as the author; (2) having rowed occasionally and run daily along the Charles River; (3) having attended Harvard College and having heard much about Harry Parker and some of the Ivy League's great rowers; (4) having read "The Amateurs" and a number of other books on crew; and (5) appreciating good writing, no matter what the topic. Like some, but not all of the other Amazon reviewers, I found Lambert's analogies and life-lessons cogent and reaffirming. If you share any of my propensities, I highly recommend the book!
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1.0 out of 5 stars For Beginners Only, Jan. 19 1999
By A Customer
Lambert's account of rowing, though seemingly poetic to the uninitiated, will dissappoint any avid rower for its sheer lack of "having been there" sentiment. The book is Lambert's chance to spout off about the magic that he sees in rowing and how lessons learned in the sport can be applied universally to any challenge in life. If you can look past his arrogance, without hesitation I recommend the book to non-rowers or novices who will see Lambert's lessons for what they are worth. But I strongly warn off any experienced or competitive rowers because you will be disgusted by Lambert's butchery of the sport. Try The Amatures instead.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Makes me want to write my own book about rowing., Sept. 25 1999
By A Customer
Craig, just do not tell me that it is not about winning the race and that the gold medal around your neck is not the most divine feeling on Earth! What you fail to point out is that it takes some talent in addition to lots of hard work to get there. That talent is "a gift of God" and if you have it, it can turn you from a novice to an Olympian rower in only 2-3 years. It takes a great coach to discover and nurture that talent, and that is why my favourite parts of the book are your descriptions of some charizmatic rowing coaches from US.
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5.0 out of 5 stars seductive sports saga, Oct. 25 2003
By 
ciz (Philadelphia, PA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Mind Over Water: Lessons on Life from the Art of Rowing (Paperback)
I had fun with this book. As a rower who has been on national teams and medaled at the Olympic Games,I resonated with this saga of rowing and what it means to those who do it. Some sports books I have read take the perspective of the outsider, the spectator. In sharp contrast, this one comes from someone who has really "been there," who has experienced training, racing, winning and losing. This is the real thing. The author extrapolates down-to-earth, practical experiences to worldly, spiritual, and even cosmic insights. Highly recommended.
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Mind Over Water: Lessons on Life from the Art of Rowing
Mind Over Water: Lessons on Life from the Art of Rowing by Craig Lambert (Paperback - Aug. 10 1999)
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