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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FRAK!!
I DID NOT HAVE HIGH HOPES FOR THESE GALACTICA BOOKS. I'M A BIG TIME BSG FAN FROM WAY BACK AND DIDN'T EXPECT ARMAGEDDON TO CAPTURE THE SPIRIT AND FUN OF THE SERIES... BUT IT DID! THE SPIRIT OF THE ORIGINAL IS ALIVE IN THIS NOVEL AND THEY'VE UPDATED THINGS TOO. THE ORIGINAL CHARACTERS HAVE GROWN OVER THE YEARS AND THERE'S NEW BLOOD ADDED WITH THE ADDITION OF NEW AND YOUNGER...
Published on July 3 2004

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars LOVED BATTLESTAR GALACTICA, THIS BOOK WAS OK
I have missed the tv series Battlestar Galactica for quite some time.Thanks to Amazon.com, I have been able to view the series through the several videos offered. That is when I discovered this book. If Richard Hatch had concentrated more on the Cylons and the humans struggle with these demons, and less on his "Use the Force Apollo", this would have been a...
Published on Oct. 7 1999 by Dave


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars LOVED BATTLESTAR GALACTICA, THIS BOOK WAS OK, Oct. 7 1999
By 
Dave (Washington, DC) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Battlestar Galactica (Hardcover)
I have missed the tv series Battlestar Galactica for quite some time.Thanks to Amazon.com, I have been able to view the series through the several videos offered. That is when I discovered this book. If Richard Hatch had concentrated more on the Cylons and the humans struggle with these demons, and less on his "Use the Force Apollo", this would have been a far better read. The book was also a bit immature at times. I think Richard Hatch takes himself and his character far too seriously. And yes, I will buy the next one. Why? It will hopefully continue the story and have less to do with the devil (Count Iblis) and the "Force".
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars FRAK!!, July 3 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Battlestar Galactica (Hardcover)
I DID NOT HAVE HIGH HOPES FOR THESE GALACTICA BOOKS. I'M A BIG TIME BSG FAN FROM WAY BACK AND DIDN'T EXPECT ARMAGEDDON TO CAPTURE THE SPIRIT AND FUN OF THE SERIES... BUT IT DID! THE SPIRIT OF THE ORIGINAL IS ALIVE IN THIS NOVEL AND THEY'VE UPDATED THINGS TOO. THE ORIGINAL CHARACTERS HAVE GROWN OVER THE YEARS AND THERE'S NEW BLOOD ADDED WITH THE ADDITION OF NEW AND YOUNGER CHARACTERS. VERY IMPRESSIVE! ARMAGEDDON GIVE US THE BEST OF ALL POSSIBLE WORLDS.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The epic saga continues 20 years on............(PART 1), Aug. 14 2003
This review is from: Battlestar Galactica (Hardcover)
NB: This review is in two parts.
Armageddon is not the best battlestar galactica book I have read, I feel that accolade should go to Robert Thurston/Glen Larson's original BSG novel. The reason, beside's that it is brilliantly written, is that it is the story of BSG at it's most raw. The novel was written directly from the original script as the first episode (Saga of a Starworld!) of BSG was being filmed, hence the reason why there are pre-production paintings of the battlestar and it's vipers displayed within the novel as opposed to actual FX shots from the episode. The story reflected how Larson originally envisioned the BSG saga to be, with the Cylons being scripted as a sort of cybernetic reptillian hybrid, plus Serina (Apollo's love interest) survives at the end of the novel as it was originally scripted. Though for the TV episode, at Jane Seymour's request, the death of her character was written into the final shooting script and filmed, only to have her death then edited out again of the episode when test audiences found it too upsetting. So I would recommend the Thurston/ Larson original novel to any fan of BSG who wanted to see how the story was originally envisioned.
The reason why I mentioned that novel in this review is because Hatch's Armageddon returns the BSG saga to this standard. I have read some of the unfair complaints here about how Hatch is only glorifying his character of Apollo at the expense of the others. This is untrue, actually the plot revolves around quite a lot of the original characters (some of whom merely served as window dressing in the TV series) as well as the new ones. Hatch actually creates an intriguing character out of Athena, turning her into a thoughtful but discplinarian individual who finds herself promoted to battlestar commander.
Hatch not only ressurrects the BSG saga but also adds a touch of much-needed revisionism to it's studio-induced faults. For instance Hatch completely ignores the final TV episode "The Hand of God" in his continuation (which I welcome because I always found the idea of Adama releasing Baltar just because he aides them in destroying a Cylon base ship absolutely ridiculous - I mean the presence of the base ship threatened Baltar's life as much as the Colonials, there was no need to make any bargains with the traitor!). Hatch most probably ignored this episode because at the end of the it the Colonials receive a transmission of the Apollo moon landing from earth which led way to the whole awful Galactica 80 concept.
The Cylons themselves also undergo some revisionism as Hatch reverts them back to their reptillian/cyborg origins. I think this is the most welcome change! I hated the way the studio execs interferred and had the Cylons rewritten as being robots (explained to us through an awful piece of exposition between Apollo and boxey which was added at the last minute to episode 1 befored it aired on TV. Thankfully the cinema version had no such interference!). Another character who gets a bit of a rewrite is Lucifer, the annoying "fem-bot" who was obviously modelled on C3PO and who spent most of the series involved in a "queenie" power struggle with Baltar. In Armageddon Lucifer becomes an evil and physically strong cyborg who lusts for the death of Baltar and the human race. He comes off as quite a scary character in the novel. Thanks to Hatch, he finally becomes a villain worthy of the name of "Lucifer".
Hatch also tries to explain some of the plot holes in the TV series that were caused by studio-interference. Hatch, for instance, explains why Baltar was promoted to Cylon commander in the TV series whereas in the movie/ original novel he was killed by the Cylons (according to Hatch the Cylons were secretly studying the logic traits of Baltar so they could create a Human Logic Function chip for their cyborg warriors. They planned to kill Baltar once it was completed!). It turns out the Cylons were only using Baltar after all, he never really was in charge of a Cylon base ship. Anyway I never liked that absured studio-induced plot device in the TV series which saw baltar being the main villain who leads the Cylon task force against the Galactica. I much preferred the poetic justice of him being killed off by his Cylon collaborators. I do like the way that Hatch has Baltar being a scheming prisoner (like some sort of Dr Smith from Lost in Space) of the colonials. I feel that this concept suits the Baltar character much better than the "primary villain" he became in the TV series.
As for villains, Hatch does reveal the origins of the Cylons :
****SPOILERS******!!! In the novel it is explained that the natives of the planet Cylon were a reptillian race who were visited by Count Iblis who gave them the technology to evolve themselves into cyborg warriors and conquer the universe. ******* END OF SPOILERS!!!!
Now although the above explanation for the Cylons is not exactly one that I would have preferred, it is however far better than the awful one conjured up by the studio-execs in that exposition delivered by Apollo in episode 1 (That the Cylons are actually meglomanical robotic servants of some long-exctinct alien race, who hate humans for getting involved in their affairs).
Continues in part 2....
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5.0 out of 5 stars The epic saga continues twenty years on...... (PART 2), Aug. 14 2003
This review is from: Battlestar Galactica (Hardcover)
(Continued)
Revisionism aside, the story of Armageddon is a very good one, better than any episode of the TV series. There are many plot strands which are woven together very aptly. The novel is actually quite well written (for a TV series tie-in novel) and Hatch includes a glossary at the back of the novel for all the Colonial measurements and expressions. The plot of Armageddon revolves around a power struggle for the control of the Galactica in the wake of commander Adama's death. Both Apollo and Athena, along with various others are all fighting each other for the seat of command. This in-fighting soon leads to mutiny while Apollo finds he is developing new "extra-sensory perception" (ESP) powers which enables him to come face to face with Count Iblis, who in turn is trying to destroy the fleet. The story resolves itself quite nicely and sets itself up for the next novel.
On the negative side I did find that the novel "began" rather suddenly without any kind of prologue to explain the gap of nearly 20 years between where the series left off and where this novel starts. I also felt that the Cylons were introduced rather too quickly into the plot (given that they had not encountered the colonials for over 6 years). But I suppose we can put this down to the novel being written in the style of a TV episode of the BSG series, where everything develops rather quickly so as not to bog the story down. Although I would have preferred if there was a stronger buildup to the big battle in the novel, I felt that the battle came about rather too quickly.
Another fault that I did find jarring was the odd remark made by Hatch in the novel to the Cylons being awful, almost mindless warriors who are bad shots!. I felt that Hatch, who was doing good with his revisonism regarding the Cylons!, should not have made the Cylons appear so inept. I felt that Hatch had a wonderful opportunity to complete rewrite the studio-maligned concept of the Cylons so that they would reflect what they were originally scripted to be. The only reason why the Cylons were made to appear so slow and easy to kill in the TV series was due to studio pressure (the studio execs wanted human casualties to be kept to a minimum, and so Cylons became laser fodder to the colonials!). Hatch should have pushed his revisionism further to make the Cylons appear more like the "alien race who managed to wage war with humanity for 1,000 years before annihilating most of them in a cunning trap, and not to mention that they managed to create a powerful galactic alliance amongst other alien races, as well as successfully destroying any alien race who appeared to oppose them".
Despite this I still award the Armageddon novel 5 stars for the tremendous effort Hatch has put into trying to revive the series (which he actually does not own any rights to) via this novel and the subsequent trailer for the BSG: THE SECOND COMING. By the way if you have not seen Hatch's trailer for his proposed revival of BSG, then you would be pleased to learn that this novel is the blueprint for that trailer !.
Phew! well this review was almost as long as the wait which we fans had to endure for this great epic to be continued!! I definitely recommend Armageddon to either the casual or die-hard BSG fan. It is maturely written, has plenty of action and is quite violent as well. To put it bluntly, if this novel had been made into an episode of BSG back in 1978, it would simply be considered the best BSG episode ever aired!
By the way I would recommend to every BSG fan to stay clear of the proposed re-imagining of BSG by the "sigh!"-fi channel when it crashes to our screens this december. Just read these continuation novels by Richard Hatch and let your imagination create the SFX that will easily outshine the low-budget CGI that the remake will use.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Armaggedon Will Blow You away!, Jan. 12 2002
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This review is from: Battlestar Galactica (Hardcover)
I didn't realize how good a writter Richard Hatch truly is until I read his first of three novels called Battestar Galactica: Armegddon. It's an action- packed chapter by chapter account of the remnends of the brothers and sisters searching the galaxies for the Lost Thirteenth Tribe who left for a planet called Earth a very long time ago. It is a hard exhistance trying to live in old hulls and cast iron compartments no larger than a mop closet, but they had to survive the hollocaust that wiped out their worlds, and everything the held dear. They took to the stars... those who could walk or crawl to a ship before it departed from the bleeding planets. They followed Commander Adama, who was a great and very wise man. They believed in him, and wanted - NO - they needed a leader for them to feel safe. Commander Adama stepped forward out of the shadows of the deaths of his son, his wife, and lastly, his daughter-in-law, who wed Adams' eldest son, Captain Apollo shortly after they began their trek in space.
Now, twenty years have past. Twenty years still on a course for Earth, but never finding it. The future is precarious for these people, tragically, Commander Adama is gone. He would not live to see the planet he longed so to bring his people to. Earth was out there, but Commander Adama was not meant to walk its sacred pathways. Instead, there is the need of new and capible Supreme Commander and their are plenty of choices bitting for the vaccancy. This is a troubling time for the Colonial Fleet. Just a spark matchlight a micron heigh could lead to destruction. Apollo knows what he should do...he also knows that there is someone out there somewhere waiting for him to save him..but were does he look? "TO THE STARS!"
Like the author, R.Hatch, the character Apollo begins a journey of growing up and of being proud of what they've all accomplished. Tormented and saddened, Apollo must keep faith not with Athena, or President Tigh, but with beings of a heigher order. He must find the courage to discover the voice that wants to be free. It is something as much of Apollo as air. Without that voice, the fleet is doomed and the missing warrior will never be found alive. Will Commander Apollo abandon the Galactica and her crew to chance after someting President Tigh and Athena cannon possibly understand, or will Apollo be willing to give his life to keep the fleet save from the Cylons?
Read Battlestar Galactica: Armegeddon. You'll be glad to did.
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4.0 out of 5 stars So you wanted to know what happens next?, Dec 31 2001
This review is from: Battlestar Galactica (Hardcover)
I enjoyed watching BG on TV. When I first learned that this trilogy was being written by Richard Hatch, I must admit that I snickered at the thought of the man who played Apollo trying to get published! Knowing of infamous on the set battling between the two major stars, I expected Starbuck to be killed off immediately. Boy was I wrong! I couldn't resist the tempation to check back in with these characters, so I picked up the first book and was pleasantly surprised by the content!
Richard Hatch has done an excellent job in maturing the characters without losing any of their charm. Taking place seventeen years from the TV timeline, Adama dies and leaves his son and daughter to take over most of his responsibilities. This puts Athena in as a central and important character.
The author adds some interesting back story such as more information on Kobol and the council, and places most of the emphasis on Starbuck and Apollo's relationship. By the end of the trilogy, we are reunited with our favorite guest characters such as Cain, Baltar, Tigh, Count Iblis, and the Noman, and we are introduced to the mature Troy (aka Boxey) and Dalton (daughter of Cassi and Starbuck). I loved it. Okay, there were some annoying typos and unique backstories used to explain things, but at the end of the book, you will be intrigued by the plot and fascinated at the things you never got to see played out on the show. Any BG fan, closeted or otherwise, should read this.
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4.0 out of 5 stars "Battlestar Galactica: The Second Coming" Part 1, Dec 3 2001
This review is from: Battlestar Galactica (Hardcover)
"Greetings! There's been a cylon civil war. A newer, and more lethal species of cylons has emerged, and only I can lead you to safety!" Baltar said.
That is an excerpt from Richard Hatch's magnificent trailer production, spoken by the late John Colicos himself. This book trilogy is none other than the foundation for that trailer.
Book one sets up the story twenty years after the destruction of the colonies, with the crisis of Adama's death and the struggle for power in the fleet. And there's the return of Count Iblis in the mix.
All in all, I enjoyed this book. Sure, there are a few details that aren't correct, as some other reviewers have pointed out, and some inconsistencies, which is why it only gets 4 out of 5 stars from me. But as William Shatner said before, "Get a life!" I'm joking, btw, no offense intended. :)
It's a great read for Battlestar Galactica fans who've felt cheated by Galactica 1980 for the past 21 years. It's the return of Battlestar Galactica that should have been.
I liked the mix of the original generation with the new generation. Reminds me of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan.
If you are a fan of the original, pick it up. It's worth a read.
--Ken
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4.0 out of 5 stars Return of a legend. Not Campy, May 4 1999
By 
Amazon Customer (Rancho Santa Margarita, ca, United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Battlestar Galactica (Hardcover)
I admit I was a bit skeptical at first. An actor from a defunct campy sci-fi show I loved as a child attempting to continue the voyages of the Galactica.
I bought it anyway for nostalgia's sake, and I was very pleasantly surprised. All you favorites are there, plus an introduction to a few new characters.
It was very interesting to see what has happened after all these years to the fleet, the characters, their children, Baltar, the Cylons and more. The book does a great job in bringing you up to speed, and filling in many blanks they plagued T.V. viewers so many years ago. I liked the origin explanation of the Cylons.
Also, you can see where many themes of the old testament are relevant here as they are also mixed in with Greek mythos. Those that are familar with the bible will appreciate many of the parallel's drwan here in the book.
Decent plot, begs for a sequel. The only reason this did not rate 5 stars was the lack of action in space battles. Though the battles were there, I felt as if I were missing the feel of sitting in a Viper and blasting Cylons.
Kudos to Richard Hatch and Christopher Golden.
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3.0 out of 5 stars The Next Best Thing to A New "Galactica" Movie or Series!, Dec 30 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Battlestar Galactica (Hardcover)
Needless to say, being a fan of "Battlestar Galactica" from way back in childhood (it was the first sci-fi series I was ever exposed to), I was very excited to hear that this book had been published. And even more excited to find it on Amazon.com after fruitless searches in local book retailers.
The story itself is an excellent continuations of the "Galactica" saga and it's obvious that Richard Hatch has a deep and profound love and understanding for the concept. Some might have a problem with the novel's stripped-down, bare bones narrative style which does the job of getting the reader from point "A" to point "B" but doesn't allow for a lot of in-depth characterization.
However, some people (like myself) with a visual mind can picture the action as they read along, as if it were a new episode of this series. Hopefully the fact that it doesn't read like Frank Herbert's "Dune" series (with explanations of explanations and so forth) will not be a turn-off to potential new fans.
Overall, I would say that this novel is a definite must for any "Battlestar Galactica" fan, and an enjoyable, easy read for anyone just interested in a good, escapist yarn.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Battlestar Galactica Shines Again In Engrossing Read, Aug. 5 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Battlestar Galactica (Hardcover)
Much has been written about Battlestar Galactica, the story of a mammoth warship guarding the last survivors of Twelve Worlds seeking the final outpost of humanity - Earth. It began as a television series in 1978, one that lasted but one season due to the show's expense and to network indifference. A spinoff series ran briefly in 1980 but was unsatisfying at most levels.
Battlestar Galactica has often been condemned as poorly conceived and abysmally written. True, it was made into a weekly series when it should have been a series of bi-monthly movies (the original concept creator-producer Glen Larson had in mind) and as a result scripts had a very uneven quality to them. That they nonetheless turned out quite well says a great deal about the concept.
It wasn't until Rob Liefeld and Robert Napton came out with a Battlestar Galactica comic book series in 1995 that the concept truly came into its own. The comic was beautifully written and created, able to explore c! haracters and ideas the show was unable to explore at the time of its initial run, and remains among the finest graphic novels ever put to print.
Richard Hatch, the show's star as Captain Apollo, contributed one of the comic's stories, "Apollo's Journey," a story that served as a rough draft for the novel he has coauthored with Chris Golden. Hatch expands on the basic "Apollo's Journey" storyline and co-fashions a gripping read.
The Galactica and the fleet of refugee ships under her protection are caught in the grip of political turmoil, as Commander Adama, the fleet's leader since the Final Destruction of the Twelve Colonies, dies. The turmoil, it turns out, is the machinations of Count Iblis, a mystical being with a stunning tie to the scourge of the fleet, the Cylons.
The plot and its branches are too extensive to detail here, but they are grippingly laid out, with superb exploration of the huge cast of characters created for Galactica.
Th! ere are minor nits to pick - the novel lists the Galactica ! as only carrying 75 fightercraft, yet the ship's vast size - well over 2,000 feet in length - allows the fielding of nearly 200 fightercraft. But such quibbles don't greatly injure what is an immensely enjoyable story.
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