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5.0 out of 5 stars good job again.
First of all i have read most of his books and enjoy them all.
I am impressed with this one because it does give a modern day insight into old cases which did not have this kind of experience and knowledge back then.
okay point number one. I am irish so have little knowledge of the jonbennet case. yes his arguemnt is compelling, and we all must remember that he...
Published on April 9 2006 by kevin farrell

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3.0 out of 5 stars Thoughtful recaps of past mysteries...
The highlights of this book are the recaps of mysteries with which I was unfamiliar, including Jack the Ripper, Lizzie Borden, and especially the Lindburgh Baby Kidnapping. The kidnapping piece was particularly interesting and Douglas' points regarding the involvement of Bruno Hauptmann are believable.
I don't think it is any coincidence that Douglas builds up his...
Published on Dec 29 2001 by M. Rustin


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5.0 out of 5 stars good job again., April 9 2006
First of all i have read most of his books and enjoy them all.
I am impressed with this one because it does give a modern day insight into old cases which did not have this kind of experience and knowledge back then.
okay point number one. I am irish so have little knowledge of the jonbennet case. yes his arguemnt is compelling, and we all must remember that he has the experience,not us, he has been to hell and back with the greatest scum on earth. if you read his other books then you know he detests killers and nearly died trying to catch as many as he could. so do you seriously think that he would side with someone who he believed would do such a horrible thing to a sweet young girl what , over money, i dont
but then again thats just my opinion.
i admit that he could have written it in a more clinical way, his closeness to the parents does come across, but then again his empathy with victims and their families is clearly present in other books. so he is a man of conviction only after testing all the evidence and deciding where to go.
point two the lizzie case, well someone can be innocent and be found guilty we have many examples of that in our history this side of the world, and equally someone can be guilty and be found innocent, there are many examples of that so we are buying the book to get his opinion, we must accept his opinion as his right.
so enjoy the book and keep and open mind.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Another great book from top profiler John E. DOUGLAS, July 1 2004
By 
Manfred Zeichmann (Austria) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Cases That Haunt Us (Mass Market Paperback)
As die-hard true crime buff I have read most of FBI top profiler John E. DOUGLAS' books, so THE CASES THAT HAUNT US was mandatory reading for me.
This time, he revisits some of the most shocking and infamous crimes of the last 120 years, and takes a new approach towards them utilizing modern criminal behavioral analysis and profiling. The book offers a vast array of cases in chronological order, starting with the notorious prostitue killer Jack the Ripper in 1889 's London's Eastend, and encompassing 1892's Lizzie BORDEN case (BORDEN was tried for murdering her father and stepmother with an axe, but aquitted), the tragic case of the LINDBERG kidnapping and the horrifying deeds of the Zodiac killer, a Californian serial killer of the late 1960ies/early 1970ies, up to the murder of six-year old JonBenet RAMSEY on Christmas Eve 1996 (the only case in the book in which DOUGLAS was personally involved).
It is true that several cases were never solved with no perpetrator brought to justice, and it is impossible to prove DOUGLAS's conclusions one way or another. Often decades have passed, and none of the people involved in the crime are alive. However DOUGLAS' conclusions are based on experiences and knowledge gained in a long career in law enforcement as profiler and head of the FBI's Investigative Support Unit (ISU). His observations and conclusions are absolutely convincing. Needless to say that they often contradict popular perceptions of particular cases. Take for example the Jack the Ripper case - I don't want to repeat here what the authors have to say (and hereby spoil your reading pleasure), but unsurprisingly the killer in DOUGLAS' view is NOT the type of "glamourous" murder (like Prince Eddie, the Duke of Clarence, supported by some kind of fancy conspirators) so often found in books and films about this haunting crime.
DOUGLAS'in-depth analysis of the cases with meticulous attention to details makes for fascinating reading.
My favorite chapters are the ones on Jack the Ripper and the horrible murder of JonBenet RAMSEY.
There are some pictures in the books, but with the exception of some maps I did not find them very helpful or interesting.
The book is well-written.
If you are a true crime fan like me, you will dig it!
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4.0 out of 5 stars As always, Douglas gives the reader a lot to think about., Oct. 9 2002
By 
Ian McLeod (Baltimore, MD United States) - See all my reviews
Let me start off by saying that I've read all of John Douglas's books and that excepting Mindhunter and The Anatomy of Motive, this is perhaps the most interesting since it combines two of my greatest passions: history and true crime. Moreover, I've a great deal of respect for the work which, Mr. Douglas does. True, at times he may come off as a being a bit cocky, but it is unquestionably clear that he truely cares about all the victims of violent crime as well as bringing their killers to justice. That is precisely why I find his books so appealing.
In The Cases that Haunt Us, Douglas looks at five fascinating and mostly unsolved cases: Jack the Ripper, Lizzie Borden, Lindbergh, Zodiac and JonBonet Ramsey. First, he comprehensively lays out the known facts and then gives his professional opinion concerning who the culprit was likely to have been or, at least, what type of personality they would have had. In chapter five, Douglas also gives shorter, but interesting accounts of The Black Dahlia, Lawrencia Bemebenek, and the Boston Strangler cases.
The only reason I have not given the book five stars is that I believe that including the JonBenet Ramsey case might have been a mistake. Please don't get me wrong! I do not say this because I disagree with Douglas's conclusion that the killer was someone other than one of the parents. The truth is that while (like so many others) I once believed that either Patricia or John Ramsey must be guilty; after reading this book, I began to doubt that that was indeed the case. And, since it has recently been revealed that a convicted pedophile was staying right down the block at the same time as the murder occured, I have even more doubts than before. Still, perhaps the case is too fresh because so many people have strong (though mostly emotionally based) opinions on the subject. Unfortunatly, it seems that many have concluded that Douglas's professional judgement was clouded by his own emotions concerning the JonBenet case. I disagree entirely. After reading John Douglas for years, I have absolutely no doubts that if the evidence pointed to either Patricia or John Ramsey as the killer of their little girl, he would say so and more importantly do everything in his power to see to it that they eventually paid for their crime.
In closing, The Cases that Haunt Us is a very fascinating and informative read for anyone interested in either true crime or history, so long as they leave any preconceived notions at the door.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A great read!, July 8 2002
By 
Jen Arpin (Somewhere in the Northeast) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Cases That Haunt Us (Mass Market Paperback)
Wow! This book was very enjoyable. John Douglas, with his usual serious yet cocky flair, proceeds to recap some of the most famous crimes in history. He covers Jack the Ripper, Lizzie Borden, the Zodiac, The JonBenet Ramsey murder, the Lindbergh Baby, Black Dahlia, the Boston Strangler, and a few more. He doesn't proceed to recap OJ Simpson or other cases which have received more than their fair share of attention, with the exception of the JonBenet Ramsey case, and this one I think he covers because he feels that the media misrepresented the parents. He gives background of what happened, the accused and their important behavioral traits, trials (if any) and a profile of what the killer would have been like. Fascinating stuff!
I like John Douglas. The writing style of his books, including occasional profanity inserted for emphasis, really keeps your attention. He is not overly graphic, yet doesn't sugar-coat a thing. And although he does seem to like himself an awful lot, he does not profess to be an expert on all subjects, only those he can back up with skills and experience. This book will intrigue you and keep your interest from cover to cover.
One thing I would have changed about this book- I would have added a few more unsolved cases. Perhaps lesser known, yet equally intriguing cases would have been a good addition to this book. It just seemed to be too short a book to me!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating interpretations of historic cases, March 27 2002
By 
THE CASES THAT HAUNT US provides fascinating and convincing insights into some very high-visibility crimes. When Douglas says Jack the Ripper was So-and-So or someone like So-and-So (I don't want to give you a spoiler here), I believe him. Douglas makes solid arguments regarding Jack the Ripper, Lizzie Borden, the Lindbergh kidnapping and the Zodiac. Those chapters kept me turning the pages and then wanting to learn more. I ordered additional Jack the Ripper and Lizzie Borden books and videos...even before I finished reading CASES.
Which brings me to the last chapter, on JonBenet Ramsey. That chapter read too much like a justification of Douglas's controversial defense of the Ramseys, and less like a profile. After all, he didn't have access to the evidence he would normally use to make a profile, so how could he really decide that the Ramseys are innocent? He measures other theorists with the yardsticks: "people don't act out of character. If they appear to, it is only because you don't understand the character well enough," and "'when you have eliminated the impossible, whatever remains, however improbable, must be the truth.'" Douglas would do well to measure himself with those yardsticks, too.
In retrospect, the "look and feel" of the beginning chapters of CASES doesn't seem to match the last chapter, and vice versa. Douglas and Olshaker seem to make careful studies of the historic cases, then quickly zoom over decades to Douglas's defense of his position regarding the Ramseys. Only a few references to the earlier murders tie the chapters together. Perhaps...the earlier chapters were included only as a build-up to JonBenet Ramsey. Alternatively, perhaps Douglas and Olshaker were writing a history, then decided to tack on JonBenet Ramsey. Or, maybe they knew that Jack the Ripper and JonBenet Ramsey would sell, and therefore added some cases in between.
That said, the bottom line is that CASES is a slightly disjointed but intriguing book from beginning to end. There's something here for those interested in history, and those interested in current events.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A fascinating exploration of legendary crimes, Feb. 13 2002
By 
Donna L. Hagen (Nokesville, Virginia USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Cases That Haunt Us (Mass Market Paperback)
This is a great premise: using current profiling techniques to examine crimes from Jack the Ripper to the JonBenet Ramsey murder. John Douglas, "America's foremost expert on criminal profiling", presents the facts of the cases, the crimes themselves and the crime scenes, and the suspects. Then, by applying profiling techniques to the information at hand, he explains what type of UNSUB he would expect would have committed the crime, and outlines whether the suspects fit or don't fit the profile and why. Although he doesn't "solve" any of these crimes, he presents a well reasoned explanation of why he thinks someone was wither guilty or not guilty in each case.
I have read extensively on the Ripper, Lizzie Borden, and Black Dahlia cases, and found his profiles on those to be fascinating. I am, however, disturbed by his profiling in the JonBenet Ramsey case. Here, Douglas doesn't come across as being as impartial as he was in the other cases. Of course, he was brought in by the Ramseys' attorneys to give his opinion as to whether or not he thought either one of them could have killed JonBenet; he does not think that either is guilty. Because of this, and the criticisms that have come his way from his involvement in this case, this chapter comes across as much more strident, more "I'm right! I'm right! Any whoever says I'm not is WRONG!" This quickly becomes annoying. However, that said, I will say that he did give me points to consider about that murder that I had not considered before. But I think the book would have been stronger without this last chapter; it makes you wonder if the rest of the book wasn't just written to allow Douglas to ultimately discuss the JonBenet murder, and to predispose you to believe his presentation of this sad case.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating. A good read., Dec 30 2001
By 
apoem "apoem" (Bosque Farms, NM USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Cases That Haunt Us (Mass Market Paperback)
This is a fascinating read.
The idea behind this book is that John Douglas and Mark Olshanker look at some of the unsolved cases through out history that have continued to be of interest to the public. Through the evidence and accounts of each crime, they try to apply the FBI behavioral science that has been developed since these crimes as a way to 'solve' each crime.
Beginning with Jack the Ripper and ending with the Jon Benet-Ramsey murder with a wide variety of unsolved, famous crimes in between this book is just plain fascinating. They begin with a description of the crime, the crime scene and the people involved. Then they begin to explain and catagorize what they can learn from the known facts on hand. They explore possible solutions that have been provided by other authors and try to decide if these solutions fit the crime through a behavioral science point of view. They then provide what they think might be the appropriate solution.
One thing I appreciated about this book was that these authors constantly stress that they can not prove their solution is correct, only that it fits what they know to be facts and the behavior science views. They do not belittle other authors or police, in fact, they are constantly praising the good job the police have done in each case. The stress that this is an exact science at best due to it being a behavioral science and a people science.
Another thing I appreciated about this book was that it was peppered with a variety of cases that the author had personally worked on and stories of criminal the author had personally interviewed. Rather than being distracting, these short stories only support his theories and go a long ways to explaining exactly what the authors are talking about.
I rated this a four mainly for one reason: I find that many of the sentences are long and convoluted. I find that I have to go back to reread a sentence at times to be sure I understand what the sentence was saying. Maybe others won't find this to be an issue, but it occurs just often enough that it disturbs me.
Overall, this is a very fascinating read.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Thoughtful recaps of past mysteries..., Dec 29 2001
By 
M. Rustin "mrustin" (Colorado, United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Cases That Haunt Us (Mass Market Paperback)
The highlights of this book are the recaps of mysteries with which I was unfamiliar, including Jack the Ripper, Lizzie Borden, and especially the Lindburgh Baby Kidnapping. The kidnapping piece was particularly interesting and Douglas' points regarding the involvement of Bruno Hauptmann are believable.
I don't think it is any coincidence that Douglas builds up his book with sensational mysteries from the past, and then leads into his piece about the JonBenet Ramsey investigation. In stark contrast with the earlier pieces, however, The feel of this read is far more biased. Douglas' writing during this last chapter has a defensive air vs. the exploratory air of the previous chapters. I'm surprised Olshaker let Douglas get away with that type of writing. As far as Douglas' points, I found his claim unconvincing that in no way could Jon-Benet Ramsey's parents have killed her because parents don't kill their kids that way. Douglas also talks about his "small fee" for taking on the Ramsey case, and I think that it would have been more ethical to fully disclose that fee in the book. One man's small fee is another man's fortune. Also, where were the personality profiles of the parents? How can Douglas not mention the possibility of narcissism with a parent who names his daughter after himself?
Overall, I'm disappointed in the lack of full exploration of all of the key suspects in the Ramsey piece of the book -- where was mention of the brother? However, I think the book is worth purchasing in paperbook for the fascinating overviews of old cases.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A View from the other side!, Oct. 14 2001
By 
K. L Sadler "Dr. Karen L. Sadler" (Freedom, Pa. USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I've read some, but not a lot on almost all the cases in this book. I found this fascinating reading, partially because Douglas gives us an edited view into a world most of us are interested in, but really don't want to be immersed in. He has admitted before that his job took a familial and health toll on him, and most of us recognize that we would even be less prepared for what this 'world' requires of those who work in it.
The stories/cases are especially interesting because of the insight which Douglas can give. I thought the histories of the Ripper and Borden cases were especially good. I had no idea of the historical and social context of the area in London where the Ripper resided, and the lack of forensic evidence does not seem to interfere much with the common sense with which Douglas proposes specific possible suspects.
As others have said, all I read on the Jon Benet murder was from the slanted information given through the media. Plus as a mother, I was horrified by the dressing up of this little girl to look like someone older than she was. Douglas provides a different point of view with validity, that I don't see being portrayed in the media. We definitely should not be trying people though the media...we cannot possibly know all the facts, especially when others involved (including the police, the FBI, friends of the family, etc.) all provide divergent views. I am not sure what I believe at this point, but I think I will reserve judgement in most cases from now on and also curtail my exposure to the news media's take on cases like this...
As usual, Douglas and company write a good, and intelligent book for readers. I get a huge kick out of his snide remarks...he tends to write as he thinks and as he talks, which makes it more accessible.
Karen Sadler,
University of Pittsburgh
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3.0 out of 5 stars Douglas Knows His Stuff, But I Don't Know If I Want To, Sept. 28 2001
By A Customer
Reading "The Cases That Haunt Is" it is clear that John Douglas, a former FBI profiler, knows his stuff. His case-by-case breakdown of some of the world's most famous unsolved (or possibly incorrectly solved) murders, including Jack the Ripper, Lizzie Borden and Jon Benet Ramsey, is well-researched and, as far as a lay person like myself can tell, highly accurate. Douglas makes a good case for a likely suspect TYPE in each case, and offers opinions in some as to the identity of the killer and validity of accepted evidence, but remains thoroughly professional and refrains from the lurid speculation often associated with "true crime" books. (He is particularly circumspect in the more modern cases, fearing, I'd assume, legal retaliation.)
In fact, therein lies the problem. Douglas is so professional that reading this book is like reading a police blotter, factual and insightful, but not very interesting. The prose is dry--more proof that Douglas did this (profiling) for a living, not even Mark Olshaker's writing skills can punch up Douglas' fact-by-fact analysis. I'm not usually a true crime fan and I don't obsessively follow serial killers or "big cases" on the news. Actually, I'm not even sure why I picked this book up, as it's a bit out of my typical fiction genre. I guess if I'd been more the audience this book was geared towards, I might have enjoyed it more. As it is, it just sort of creeped me out and made me realize (once again) the frightening number of truly sick individuals our modern world has spawned. Detailed reports on exactly how Jack the Ripper or Borden mutilated their victims (OK, their entire face was gone. Oh goody!) doesn't make for great bedtime reading as far as I'm concerned and as Douglas refers to case after case which has "similar" overtones to the more famous murders chronicled here you get the feeling that there's a serial killer around every corner. Mostly I just found myself wondering, again and again, how anyone can muck through horrors like this for a living. A book on how that affects someone's psyche might be REALLY interesting.
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The Cases That Haunt Us
The Cases That Haunt Us by Mark Olshaker (Mass Market Paperback - Dec 1 2001)
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