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5.0 out of 5 stars A revolutionary and yet ancient book!
Thank goodness there is someone out there that doesn't buy the fallacies enforced upon us by our Victorian-hang-over society that says touching is bad, sleeping with your child will turn them into a pervert, and that breasts are sexual objects and shouldn't be for feeding your child beyond 6 months.
This is a wonderful book, I give it out regularly at baby showers to...
Published on July 28 2004 by Ahleemah Joy

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This book insults "thinking" mothers and fathers
I consider myself an "attachment parent" - my son is exclusively breastfed, he sleeps in the Arm's Reach cosleeper and I carry him whenever I can. And, believe me, I love Dr. Sears as much as the next mom. But I found this book to be nothing more than propaganda for Dr. Sears. On top of that, the author makes you feel guilty and stupid if you don't follow her ideas to...
Published on July 10 2002 by Rebecca A. Moore


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This book insults "thinking" mothers and fathers, July 10 2002
This review is from: Attachment Parenting: Instinctive Care for Your Baby and Young Child (Paperback)
I consider myself an "attachment parent" - my son is exclusively breastfed, he sleeps in the Arm's Reach cosleeper and I carry him whenever I can. And, believe me, I love Dr. Sears as much as the next mom. But I found this book to be nothing more than propaganda for Dr. Sears. On top of that, the author makes you feel guilty and stupid if you don't follow her ideas to the T. This book left me feeling like my son would be scarred for life unless I did exactly what it says. Sorry, but parents and children are more complicated than that, and I prefer to think for myself.
If you want to know more about attachment parenting, skip this patronizing and insulting book and go straight to something from the Sears library.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Did not add to my knowledge in any way, Nov. 20 1999
By 
Kiri (Camden, ME) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Attachment Parenting: Instinctive Care for Your Baby and Young Child (Paperback)
I found this book to be really redundant, dogmatic and frankly, insulting in its lack of new information. It just did not contribute any knowledge beyond the other books that are widely available, and that are better-written. Most of the information in the book is a rehash of stuff from Dr. William Sears' books (which I love) and from Our Babies Ourselve, by Meredith Small (another great book!). Please check out those much more interesting and informative works instead of this.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars fairly preachy, May 19 2005
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This review is from: Attachment Parenting: Instinctive Care for Your Baby and Young Child (Paperback)
main point of book is to breastfeed as over half of it dwells on that. also, references are often repeated as they are provided at end of eacfh heading. interesting read but no mysteries solved...
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5.0 out of 5 stars A revolutionary and yet ancient book!, July 28 2004
By 
Ahleemah Joy (Regina, SK, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Attachment Parenting: Instinctive Care for Your Baby and Young Child (Paperback)
Thank goodness there is someone out there that doesn't buy the fallacies enforced upon us by our Victorian-hang-over society that says touching is bad, sleeping with your child will turn them into a pervert, and that breasts are sexual objects and shouldn't be for feeding your child beyond 6 months.
This is a wonderful book, I give it out regularly at baby showers to new moms to counteract the fearful misinformation of those who believe babies need to be controlled and manipulated into becoming human beings, instead of gently unfolded like precious creatures, with just the right amount of loving guidance.
Co-sleeping advocates can find books with better research and references, clearly this book was not meant to be a complication of research, but it's a refreshing change from the infamous Crib industry-sponsored "study" (which managed to lump in drug using mothers passed out on their babies and calling that "co-sleeping") making the uneducated public up in arms about that issue.
All in all, an easy read and a good beginning to point towards more varied and detailed books.
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5.0 out of 5 stars I was skeptical but this book is great, Jan. 23 2003
By 
Laura Reivers (Taylorsville, OH) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Attachment Parenting: Instinctive Care for Your Baby and Young Child (Paperback)
While I was pregnant, I read lots of books on baby and child care. I had heard of "attachment parenting" and it sounded sort of strange to me. A friend with wonderful kids I like a lot recommended this book to me and I read it cover to cover as soon as I brought it home.
Being a nurse, I loved the great medical references backing up all the book's suggestions. Plus, that's really what the author does. She suggests. She never says that there is only one "right" way to do anything. She encourages parents to become informed, get to know their own baby and then parent in the ways that feel right for their family.
She talks about her own chldren and she includes many, many real life examples from other families who talk about how attachment parenting works for them. Basically, the list of chapters serves as a "menu" of potential parenting options. As she says, some people may breastfeed but not sleep with their babies. Some may use a sling *and* a stroller. But if you do choose to nurse past babyhood or sleep with your baby, this book will give you all the info to support and help you with your decision. This would be the perfect book to give a mother in law who keeps bugging you about why you are still nursing or why you don't let the baby cry himself to sleep.
This is a well written, well documented, gentle book. If some other reviewers found it threatening or preachy, it might be their own deeply ingrained prejudices or defenses butting heads with a book that clearly challenges a lot of what we Americans believe to be the gospel truth of child care.
I loved it and highly recommend it.
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3.0 out of 5 stars attachment parenting, Dec 2 2002
This review is from: Attachment Parenting: Instinctive Care for Your Baby and Young Child (Paperback)
I consider myself an "attachment parent" by most standards (although I prefer not to use the term to describe myself) and can relate to the annoying remarks that I was "spoiling" my twins, only making things "harder" for myself, and "need to put them on a schedule". For me it made sense to feed my babies on demand when they were hungry instead of forcing them to be on a "schedule", and co-sleeping allowed my husband and I to care for and stay close to our babies during the night until we feel they are ready to sleep away from us. I commend the author for writing this book and challenging the "norms" of our society, even though most parents and pediatricians don't feel there is a problem or harm in bottlefeeding or putting a newborn in a crib in a separate room/nursery. After careful thought, I changed my previous review and decided to rate this book 3 out of 5 because at times the author did take on a very preachy, defensive, and even slightly radical tone in some of her arguments that came across as a turn off and didn't take into consideration challenging or unexpected circumstances. I feel that taking a more objective approach in marketing attachment parenting to expecting & new parents who are trying to learn more about it could have toned down the "preachy" nature I and a few other reviewers felt was evident in this book; but that's my opinion. Ultimately, my suggestion is that you use this book as a reference and take what you need from it like any other book in your home library. You don't have to agree with the author 100%, but use the advice to follow *your instincts* as a parent.
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3.0 out of 5 stars attachment parenting, Nov. 18 2002
This review is from: Attachment Parenting: Instinctive Care for Your Baby and Young Child (Paperback)
I consider myself an "attachment parent" by most standards (although I prefer not to use the term to describe myself) and can relate to the annoying remarks that I was "spoiling" my twins, only making things "harder" for myself, and "need to put them on a schedule". For me it made sense to feed my babies on demand when they were hungry instead of forcing them to be on "schedule", and co-sleeping allowed my husband and I to care for our babies and stay close to them during the night until we feel they are ready to sleep away from us. I commend the author for writing this book and challenging "the norms" of our society, even though most parents and even pediatricians don't feel there is a problem or harm in bottlefeeding or putting newborns in cribs in a separate room/nursery. After careful thought, I changed my previous review and decided to rate this book 3 out of 5 because at times the author did take on a very preachy, defensive, and even slightly radical tone in some of her arguments that came across as a turn off and didn't take into consideration challenging or unexpected circumstances. I feel that taking a more objective approach in marketing attachment parenting to expecting & new parents who are trying to learn more about it could have toned down the "preachy" nature that I and a few other reviewers felt was evident in this book, but that's my opinion. Ultimately, my suggestion is that you use this book as a reference and take what you need from it like any other book in your home library. You don't have to agree with the author 100%, but use the advice to follow *your instincts* as a parent.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Much on advice for very narrow situations., Jan. 16 2002
By 
Jessica Allan Schmidt (People's Republic of Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Attachment Parenting: Instinctive Care for Your Baby and Young Child (Paperback)
I'm not quite an attachment parent. This has never bothered me. My younger child cannot sleep with anyone touching her (the very same way that her father can't sleep with anyone touching him). My older child was formula fed. But I'm more or less an AP parent, and when I started running into situations I couldn't figure out, I bought this book.
It was useless. Utterly and completely useless.
It wasn't bad, and it would provide good perspective and some ideas for an expectant mother -- one that didn't want to work (the section on being a "working attachment parent" was pathetic), one that had plenty of support for breastfeeding and cosleeping, et cetera. I came to this book when my daughter was eleven months old and refusing to nurse at all, well beyond the nursing strike stage. I flipped through, hoping for some ideas on how to make formula feeding work with her yet still retain the affection that had always dominated our nursing sessions.
Not one word on use of formula was written, unless it was to advise me I may as well be pouring rat poison down my daughter's throat. The book was far too preachy on the value of breastmilk, and breastmilk is great, but with well over 80% of American infants weaned by six months of age, you'd think it would occur to the author that a loving respectful formula feeding relationship may need to be addressed at one point or another.
I continued flipping on through. Why I should never put my child in a "baby cage" (in English, a crib). Why I should never let my child have a bottle (which shows right there what happened to the "working attachment parent" section). Why I should never put my child in a stroller.
This is great for preachiness, but as for actual parents who run across these situations, they are Anathema. There is no excuse for allowing your child <gasp> to sleep anywhere but with you! Or worse, allowing an artifical nipple in your baby's mouth, ever, even if you're pumping breastmilk so you can go back to work and support this baby and yourself! The horror!
The author needs a grip on reality and some advice for integrating actualities of modern living into parenting for the 95% of us in the world that do not insist on perfectionism for our children. Like Sears & Sears, Mothering magazine, and many others, the self-congratulatory tone of "I did this and look how well MY children turned out" dominates, and actual useful advice to raise children with in the event that everything does not go perfectly is conspicuously absent.
By nearly any standard -- babywearing, cosleeping (which did work with my older daughter), breastfeeding (until 11 months, anyway), et cetera, I'm an attachment parent. But good luck to all potential AP people out there who intend to integrate reality with parenting, because I have yet to see the book where the authors will actually offer useful advice unless everything goes Just Perfectly and On Schedule.
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3.0 out of 5 stars An Appendix to Dr. Sears' "The Baby Book", Jan. 14 2002
By 
Orson Wang (Novi, MI) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Attachment Parenting: Instinctive Care for Your Baby and Young Child (Paperback)
This book tries very hard to convince the reader that "attachment parenting" is the best way to take care of your infant. This dogmatism proves to be somewhat problematic for both those sold on "attachment parenting" and for those who are unsure if such an approach is appropriate for them.
On the one hand, this book rehashes a lot of information that William Sears has already championed in his many books (with "The Baby Book" being the best all-in-one reference) but with a more fervent tone. In fact, this book makes very frequent references to Dr. Sears' many books. For example, in discussing the art of using a baby sling, this book refers the reader to diagrams in "The Baby Book". However, this book does add a modern touch, with plenty of references to other resources at the end of every section, including web resources. Also, the authors refer quite often to evidence or research to back their recommendations, although these references frequently are not properly footnoted. Overall, this is an information-dense book.
On the other hand, those who are undecided on "attachment parenting" will likely be turned off by the defensive hard-sell tone. The authors take a much less tolerant view of any other approach, which is slightly ironic considering the "trust your instincts" message which is at the center of "attachment parenting". For example, in the section on breast-feeding versus formula feeding, the authors dutifully cite the enormous evidence regarding the benefits of breast feeding. When it comes to bottle feeding (whether with formula or with pumped breast milk), the authors take a very intolerant stance, virtually discounting all possible reasons to opt for bottle feeding except for medical conditions. If the father feels a little left out, the book only supplies ways for the father to deal with it. Dr. Sears, by contrast, acknowledges the benefits of bottle feeding, including an opportunity for the father to bond during feeding, but gently urges breast feeding. This softer sell is undoubtedly more palatable for the undecided parent.
For the die-hard attachment parent, this book will find a nice home next to any of Dr. Sears' books. For the casual or undecided, Dr. Sears' "The Baby Book" remains the single-volume must-have.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Best parenting book I've ever read...and I've read a lot!!, Nov. 21 2001
By 
Ellen Petty "Leah & Levi's Mommy" (New Berlin, IL United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Attachment Parenting: Instinctive Care for Your Baby and Young Child (Paperback)
I absolutely LOVED this book...and highly recommend it to everyone!
I wish I'd read it before my first child. I bought a bunch of books on attachment parenting after I found out that's what my parenting style is now called. This one was, by far, my favorite because it covered all of the topics in depth, and was a very easy read. I finished it in 2 nights.
I think this book, along with "The Continuum Concept," should be required reading for ALL humans...not just parents! There were parts of both books that made me cry when I thought back at how I allowed my daughter to cry as a baby because I'd been told I would spoil her if I picked her up every time she cried. This book allows you to see things from the baby's point of view. There's even a quote in the book, from an old man who was nursed as a toddler, and could remember with great clarity, the comfort and security and love he felt when his mother carried him in her sling and nursed him on demand. I hope my son can carry the same blissful memories with him for a lifetime.
It gave me the reassurance that my parenting instincts are WAY more important than a lot of the "expert" advice floating around out there!! After reading this book, and mothering my son the way I instinctively knew I should, I now have a beautiful, healthy, 10 month old son who amazes all who meet him by how secure, content, and happy he seems to be...not just on occassion, but ALL THE TIME...thanks, IN NO SMALL PART, to the ideas presented in this book.
Love those babies!! Co-sleeping, nursing on demand, babywearing, child-led weaning...all are the way to go!
I not only recommend that you buy and read this book for yourself, but suggest that you buy at least one extra. As I guarantee you'll want to give one to a friend!
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