Customer Reviews


17 Reviews
5 star:
 (9)
4 star:
 (5)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An earlier look at Bujold's universe, and highly enjoyable
There are those who consider this below Bujold's usual standard, but I found it quite a fun novel with several highly sensitive sequences, and therefore give it five stars.
It is a story to relax and enjoy, not overly analyze. It takes place 200 years before the Vorkosigan stories, and follows Leo Graf, an engineer sent to the planet Rodeo to be a welding instructor...
Published on July 7 2003 by Neal Reynolds

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars One of her weaker works
In Falling Free Bujold fails to create characters as complex as Aral, Cordelia, or Miles. The story feels very plot oriented, with hard science fiction tendancies. The story distance in time from Miles days makes it an unimportant novel in regards to her other novels. The book ends leaving one waiting for a sequel. Maybe a second story would make this one feel more...
Published on Dec 1 1999 by Randall Miyashiro


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An earlier look at Bujold's universe, and highly enjoyable, July 7 2003
By 
Neal Reynolds (Indianapolis, Indiana) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Falling Free (Mass Market Paperback)
There are those who consider this below Bujold's usual standard, but I found it quite a fun novel with several highly sensitive sequences, and therefore give it five stars.
It is a story to relax and enjoy, not overly analyze. It takes place 200 years before the Vorkosigan stories, and follows Leo Graf, an engineer sent to the planet Rodeo to be a welding instructor to the genetically altered Quaddies.
He immediately discovers an attitude on the part of the administrators on the planet toward these mutated beings, but takes them as they are, a human species most of whom are still developing youngsters.
This is primarily an adventure story with well developed human and mutated human characters. There are tender scenes such as that between Silver who's deeply attuned to music and Madame Minchenko, the project physician's wife who also is deeply musically inclined. But there's also plenty of action, and the underlying plea for respect for all forms of life.
Read for enjoyment and I think you'll quite appreciate it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Visionary Space Adventure, Jan. 12 2003
By 
Jack Gardner "jvg1" (Austin, TX United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Falling Free (Mass Market Paperback)
Richly deserves the Nebula award it received. A true space adventure with superior imagination, original thinking, characterization, psychology, and insight into motivations. Without ever directly mentioning philosophic issues of ethics, natural rights, political rights, justice, individual responsibility, or what makes a human a human, Bujold shows you all of these issues in the actions of the characters. Seemingly without effort. That is great writing. She makes you think simply as part of reading a great, visionary adventure.
Here are some of the insights, not necessarily original, that Bujold illustrates even though she does not state them explicitly. Intelligent beings, however genetically engineered, cannot be molded. They will be individuals, not subordinate parts of a collective. They will necessarily develop through the process of everyday living their own psychologies, goals, and choices suited to their natures as humans. Everyone might be considered a degree of mutant in the sense that we all have different genetics, though the term is intended for more than usually significant differences. Even so, the degree of difference required is somewhat subjective and has no inherent moral significance. Love and sexual attraction are responses to values and virtues seen, or imagined, in others, not simply biological chemistry. The concept of justice includes natural rights and freedom for intelligent beings regardless of their political affiliation or designation. Neither justice nor natural right of freedom necessarily ensures any political protection against violation of your freedom or life by others. Thus, responsibility for providing for oneself (food, self-defense, etc.) is both a natural right and an obligation. People have the power to make, and are responsible for, their own choices and actions.
My favorite insight points out that life is a process of effort and achievement -- tasks suitable to humans. No problems only occurs with death. "...don't be afraid of troubles, Silver. They're a sign of life."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fun sci-fi adventure with some deeper philosophical issues, July 19 2001
This review is from: Falling Free (Mass Market Paperback)
I absolutely love Lois McMaster Bujold; she is one of my all-time favorite authors. But one of the problems I have with recommending her books is that I don't know where to start! It's hard to find the beginning of her Vorkosigan series. Falling Free, although not really part of the series, is the chronological beginning and a good introduction to LMB. In this book (as with all her books), she combines intelligence, humor, drama, and a touch of philosophy and blends them into a rollicking, quick-moving adventure story. This particular novel also has some good, hard science-fictional ideas, ideas which I found fascinating.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Who actually own genetically engineered products?, June 28 1999
This review is from: Falling Free (Mass Market Paperback)
Ms. Bujold's novel won the 1988 Nebula Award for best science fiction novel of the year. It is centered in an orbiting workstation of a megacorporation. The corporation has genetically engineered humans (most of whom are teenagers or younger) having no legs and four arms, called quaddies, so that they are more effective and efficient in a zero gravity environment. The corporation considers them property rather than workers since it was the corporation that actually made them. A visiting welding instructor and engineer named Leo Graf sets out to free them. Actually, this novel is a part of Bujold's science fiction series, most of which are centered around members of the Vorkosigan family. The action in "Falling Free" occurs about 200 years before the action in Bujold's first novel, "Shards of Honor" (1986). The question of who is the real owner of genetically engineered products is a hot topic in biochemistry and molecular biology circles today and, believe it or not, Ms. Bujold's novel has been discussed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Good, but not her best., May 17 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Falling Free (Audio Cassette)
It took a little while to really get into, but this book is a good read. It is not, however, as good as much of Bujold's other work, most of which, for some reason, Amazon does not seem to carry. She has a series of books featuring the very engaging character Miles Vorkosigan (and before that, his parents) that are truly outstanding. 9s and 10s all the way. Some of these have been collected two or three at a time into large-format paperbacks. For the sake of the unitiated (and Amazon stock-holders), I hope Amazon adds all of Bujold's titles to their listings soon
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Better on the Re-Read..., Oct. 28 2001
This review is from: Falling Free (Mass Market Paperback)
This science-fiction book tells the stories of the genetically engineered quaddies (not much of a spoiler -- see the cover... Either of them.), and Leo Graf, who befriends them. My first reading, I was looking for something more like _The Warrior's Apprentice_, with a somewhat manic protagonist, and Leo isn't that. (Nor are the 2 quaddies who get some time as viewpoint characters.) But upon second and third re-readings, I really started to appreciate the characters and enjoy the story for the technology-solution-to-problem-(with-great-characters!) that it is.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent ethical adventure, May 14 2001
By 
Mark Cederholm (Flagstaff, AZ USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Falling Free (Mass Market Paperback)
This fascinating story starts out as a moody, introspective, disturbing glance into the deep, dark, truthful mirror of corporate ethics (or the lack thereof). Suddenly, the next thing you know, the story turns into a rollicking good adventure yarn and an entertaining satire of bureaucracy that will have you laughing and cheering at the end. Not the greatest story in the world, but definitely worth reading.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars One of her weaker works, Dec 1 1999
By 
Randall Miyashiro (San Francisco, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Falling Free (Mass Market Paperback)
In Falling Free Bujold fails to create characters as complex as Aral, Cordelia, or Miles. The story feels very plot oriented, with hard science fiction tendancies. The story distance in time from Miles days makes it an unimportant novel in regards to her other novels. The book ends leaving one waiting for a sequel. Maybe a second story would make this one feel more complete.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Graet story, greater characters., Sept. 21 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Falling Free (Mass Market Paperback)
This book is only marginally in the Vorkosigan Saga, but this does not make it a minor book by Bujold. The story is breath-taking, as are all Bujold stories. But the depth of some characters (Leo Graf in particular) is maybe even better here. Bujold's remarkable humanism, which is a constant throughout her work (Ethan of Athos, Mountains of Mourning, etc.) is here at its best.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars 200 Years Before the Vorkosigan Adventures, Oct. 15 2000
By 
watzizname "watzizname" (Murfreesboro, Tennessee) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Falling Free (Mass Market Paperback)
This delightful book tells of the origin of the Quaddies, one of which turns up in one of the Vorkosigan adventures (I don't recall just which one, but read them all; they are all great fun to read).
It is not necessary to read this before you read "Cordelia's Honor," but this is one of Bujold's best, and every one of her books so far is excellent.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Falling Free
Falling Free by Lois McMaster Bujold (Mass Market Paperback - June 15 1999)
Used & New from: CDN$ 0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews