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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It Works--Thoughts and tips from a dad who taught his 3 kids
Overview: The book does what it says, pretty much. In just 100 lessons you child should learn to read on a first-grade level. Not just decode words, but read and understand. The lessons are generally easy. I wondered how the book would get across difficult concepts such as short and long vowels and letter sometimes having different sounds. These are worked into the...
Published on Jan. 19 2004 by Wayne's wife

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Works, but lessons aren't always "easy"
After using this with my eldest child, I did not use it with my other children. Yes, she was reading very well *before* the 100th lesson, but starting at about lesson 60, the lessons became long and difficult. Also, it does not lay a good foundation for spelling. My eldest child struggled for years with spelling because of the poor foundation laid by this book. And...
Published on Dec 19 2002 by Joan Anne


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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It Works--Thoughts and tips from a dad who taught his 3 kids, Jan. 19 2004
This review is from: Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons (Paperback)
Overview: The book does what it says, pretty much. In just 100 lessons you child should learn to read on a first-grade level. Not just decode words, but read and understand. The lessons are generally easy. I wondered how the book would get across difficult concepts such as short and long vowels and letter sometimes having different sounds. These are worked into the lessons just like everything else-a little bit at a time and in the right order-and they were no problem. There are no big concepts to teach, facts to memorize, etc. Some parts of some lessons might be difficult, but the concepts are broken down into pieces and taught over several lessons, so there are no stumbling blocks. Just 10-15 minutes for a lesson each night.
Other Books: I can't compare this to other books. This was the only one I could find when I started to teach my children and so I've not seen any others to compare it against. I know one book has a title of 20 lessons. After my experiences, I don't think 20 lessons is enough to learn anything useful.
My Experience, Child 1: I started with my oldest when she was 5. I was learning about how to do this while she was learning how to read. She was (and is) strong-willed and got upset easily when she had a problem. With the book's method, when the child makes a mistake you just tell them what they should say and let them try again until they get it right-very little pressure. However, my oldest would get frustrated when she could not get it right the first time. She would get so frustrated we would had to stop in the middle of a lesson and start over in a day or two many, many times. We also did not have a lesson every day. When she started kindergarten, I stopped the lessons because of the problems we were having and the fact that she was learning phonics in school. However, what she did learn gave her a head start and helped her. My experiences with my other two children showed that her experience was an exception. I think the problem was my lack of experience and her strong-willed nature. If I had it to do over, I would have continued the lessons though kindergarten.
Child 2: I started child 2 when she was 5. I had learned a lot from my first attempt and we did just fine. I did not remember to give her a lesson every day so it took a while to finish. We were only at 50 when she started kindergarten but we continued anyway. Starting at about lesson 60 or so she really seemed to catch on and each lesson got easier. She is now reading on level 3.2 half-way through first grade.
Child 3: I just started child 3 when he was 4 1/2. We are at lesson 25 and he is doing even better than child 2. We are having lessons almost every day and he should be finished when he is 5.
Tips:
1. Skip the "Writing Sounds" section of each lesson. This is the last part of each lesson where the child writes the letters they are learning. My first child had a problem with the "Writing Sounds" part of each lesson. She spent more time on this that the rest of the lesson and got frustrated with it very easily. On the advice of an elementary teacher, I started skipping this. She did better after that. I skipped for my other two and they did just fine without it. It does help reinforce learning the sounds, but it is a lot of effort than can discourage the child for a small return in learning.
2. Be on the look out for typos. There are quite a few of them in the book. There were all in the words for the parent, so it's not too bad. Most of them are words in the wrong color-red verses black.
3. Don't be too literal with reading exactly the instructions the parent is supposed to read to the child. In particular, the phrase "Don't get fooled" appeared a lot. This got old very quick and didn't apply anyway so I started leaving it out.
4. The book teaches pronouncing "was" as "wuz." This is an acceptable pronunciation, but I believe that "woz" is more correct. (And I'm from Alabama.) I taught mine to say "woz". You might want to do this also. (This is one of the few words like "is" and "said" that can't just be sounded out.)
5. The hardest thing for my children to learn was the leap from saying the sounds in a word to saying the word-from s (pause) a (pause) m to sam. This is really the only hard thing in the book. If you child has a problem with this, work on this with them. Tell them to try to keep saying one sound until they start the next one. They will eventually get it right. It took my second from lesson 15 until about lesson 40 to get this right. With my third child I knew this going in and emphasized the "rhyming" and other parts in the first 20 lessons and he picked it up a lot quicker.
6. Before you start, read through a few lessons throughout the book to get a feel for how the lessons progress. This would have helped me a lot with the first child.
7. Don't get stressed. It really is 100 easy lessons. If your child has a problem, feel free to backup a few lessons.
8. Try very hard not to skip days. This was really a problem with my first two. I've been better about it with my third and it seems to help.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars structured program, June 5 2004
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This review is from: Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons (Paperback)
This worked well for my five year old son who still had another 6 months to go before starting kindergarten. I felt he had the potential to learn reading basics but although I'm a teacher I wasn't sure how to approach this task with my own child. He didn't seem to be picking it up from my "whole language" approach. A homeschooling mom recommended this to me and I bought it immediately. It is a very scripted program (which goes against my grain and my training!) but I gave it a try. I have to say, the method has worked. I am halfway through the book and my son now knows most letter sounds and blends and can sound out words, it makes sense to him. It is far from "magic" however. It requires a sustained committment, and the child has to focus and concentrate at each session, but the lessons are short enough and there is enough repetition for him to experience success, which is motivating. I also don't follow every script exactly and have skipped the "sounds writing" part of the lessons. I'll go back to that part later. My main focus now is on phonetic awareness, and the book works for that.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Book! One suggestion, Jan. 27 2004
By 
Kelly Stockdale (Cartersville, GA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons (Paperback)
This book is wonderful! My son who is 5 years old is halfway through in three weeks. Yes, three weeks! In the beginning he could not read any words except for the words Yellow and Red - and his name:)
One suggestion that I would HIGHLY recommend is that you start out making sure that when your child sounds out the letters such as "L" to not sound it out like "La" or the letter "D" as "Duh". My son had a hard time in the beginning reading Old because he would say O la dah. Also, what I did that REALLY helped was tell my child to sound out EACH letter slowly and listen to what he just said and then say it FAST. (slow - fast method works VERY well IF you tell the child to listen to himself and then say it fast WITHOUT trying to guess what it says). Many times they do not know the word or never heard of it so...naturally, it confuses them:)
Occassionally, if I felt that it was getting harder for him, I would go backwards without him knowing. This way he would not get frustrated and lose his interest in reading. Homeschooling with this book has been a real blessing!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Works, but lessons aren't always "easy", Dec 19 2002
This review is from: Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons (Paperback)
After using this with my eldest child, I did not use it with my other children. Yes, she was reading very well *before* the 100th lesson, but starting at about lesson 60, the lessons became long and difficult. Also, it does not lay a good foundation for spelling. My eldest child struggled for years with spelling because of the poor foundation laid by this book. And isn't that one of the purposes of a phonics program--to teach spelling as well as reading?
Do *not* use this book to remediate an older child: the introduction clearly states that this program is only for those who have had *no* prior reading instruction. Once you look at the lessons you will see why. A modified alphabet is used, which would be confusing to a child who had already been exposed to our regular alphabet.
On the plus side, lessons are fully scripted, meaning it tells you exactly what to say and when to say it. This is a huge benefit for inexperienced parents. Also, children find the stories and pictures very entertaining.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Results- but did not come easy, April 11 2012
By 
JB (Toronto, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons (Paperback)
I bought this book when my daughter were 4 1/2. She showed an interest in reading and writing, and I wanted something where I was directed step by step. I am not a teacher and did not know how to teach her. Even though the program is easy to follow and progresses at a good pace, it was definately NOT easy. Frankly it was like pulling teeth! We did one lesson per day. It took about 20 minutes, and it was 20 painful minutes. We stopped at lesson 40 when she started JK. I think it gave her a good base to start school. The school sent home sight word sheets to work on and we did those rather lazily. When my daughter turned 5 this january, she asked if we could do the sight word sheets faster. She set a goal for herself. Since she was now not only interested but also eager to learn, I pulled out the book again. We went back a few lessons to review and this time things went sooo well! The lessons now are finished in less than 10 minutes. It's no longer pulling teeth, but a joy to see how she is progressing. It has definately helped her with her sight words. The strategies she has learned in the book, such as stretching sounds, were reinforced at school. Techniques she learned in class, has helped with the book lessons. We are now at lesson 65 and moving along well. She has read Go Dog Go, and Are You My Mother. We also uses the Bob Books series as quick wins, and encouragement.
The intro to the book says the program should not be used if the child can already read. I don't entirely agree with this. Yes, the book uses funny spelling, but that is easy enough to adapt too. I think that the school program, in addition to the book, has really given her tools to learn to read. The 2 programs worked well together and supported each other, to her benefit.
Overall, the program is excellent. We don't do the writing part and I don't follow the silly script, but it doesn't take much to adapt the parent part without affecting the flow or spirit of the lesson.
In conclusion, the program is easy to follow, but in the beginning, the lessons are far from easy, as your child gets frustrated and so do you, as the parent. At some point though, and I think it happened in school, their minds open up, and then things do get much easier, even enjoyable. I am glad we came back to the book and didn't quit when things were hard.
Good luck, you won't regret the hard work, you as a parent put in, and in the end you will be delighted to see your child reading and decoding words using the strategies they learned through the program.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful resource for a child with learning disabilities!, Jan. 15 2004
This review is from: Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons (Paperback)
My husband and I were extremely frustrated with resources that were made available to our daughter at her school. We decided to home school since we saw our daughter giving up in her class due to the difficulties she was having because of dyslexia. After a month of research, we realized this method was a one-on-one version of the highly recommended Distar program. We have been using it and had amazing results!!!! Our daughter is learning to read and is excited about reading! Despite her challenges with dyslexia she is becoming a true reader and comprehending what she is reading. Many students have the ability to read without having learned each individual step, this is not always possible with a learning disable student. It is difficult to develop a love for reading when the child is struggling with each word. Learning to read requires consistent, disciplined work, so don't let the title mislead you into thinking this is a "quick fix." You still need to work, but know that this program is effective! I am a teacher and I specialize in learning disabled children. This is a GREAT program!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This worked for my 2 year and 10 months old daughter, June 3 2001
This review is from: Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons (Paperback)
Since my daughter was born, my husband and I have been reading to her every night. At the age of 2 1/2, there was nothing she would rather do than being read to. Also around that time, she started getting frustrated, because she couldn't say her favorite sentence "I can do it by myself!" regarding to reading her books. And she would frequently ask questions about different words she saw in books, picture cards, TV, etc. At that point I thought that, although a little younger, she might be ready to start learning some basics of reading. After doing some research and finding so many favorable reviews of the "Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons" by Engelmann, I bought it, and started doing the lessons with my daughter. After just three or four lessons we quit, because she was was getting bored and could not do the rhyming sections, where after I said a word (e.g. "eat"), she was supposed to rhyme with a letter such as "m", and tell me "meat". Also she had a hard time doing the last section of every lesson, where the child is supposed to write two or three particular letters as an exercise. The love of learning is inherent in every young child who has not been discouraged in some way or another, and I do believe we should encourage them, but never push them. As a parent you know when your child is not enthusiastic about learning something or is getting bored, and for me that's always been the gauge to stop. If they are not having fun with a certain activity, then they should not be doing it, even if that means learning to read. Four months after having quit the reading lessons with my daughter, she started whinning again that she did not know how to read, and I decided to give it another try. Now we are in lesson 8 and yesterday for the first time, she read the words "mat" and "set" by pointing at and sounding out each letter. There were striking differences this time around, where now she asks me eargerly every day when we are going to do the "reading game". Few days ago, she also got the hang of what she was supposed to do on the rhyming sections of the book. For the letter writing section at the end of the lessons, I will prewrite the letters in dots, so she just has to fill them herself, while she says the sounds out loud. Also what might have helped her is that for the past few months she has been doing more activities with letters and words at her Montessori school, and also she has perfected her pencil hold whenever scribbling something in a piece of paper. We are not in a hurry to finish each lesson, and sometimes we spend two days in a lesson. Before I had to use bribes such as stickers or candies for her to join me for the lessons. Now I use lots of praise, hugs and high fives, and whenever she shows signs of boredom, I stop and ask her if she would like to continue the following day. Sometimes she says yes, other times she tells me she wants to finish the lesson. Besides the obvious wonders of having a child learning to read, also this "reading game" time has given my daughter and I a joyous bonding time together. I work full time outside my home, and I can't think of a more efficient and joyous way of using our precious time together. BTW, there are two other things I would recommend to complement these lessons: the "Bob Books First" (Maslen), where the simple black and white pictures will not distract a child from the real meat of the books which are the wonderful stories; and the award winning PBS Kids show "Between the Lions" and the show's website ([...] which contains lots of fun reading games for children just starting to read. Good luck to everyone.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!, Jan. 27 2004
By 
Karl Houseknecht (Palmyra, VA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons (Paperback)
Have completed 8 lessons so far with our 4.5 year-old and she is sounding out simple 3 letter words on her own.
It's easy! Each lesson outlines in script form exactly what you say and do, and what your child must say and do. There are even scripted explanations of how to correct mistakes. All you need is the book, a pencil and some ruled paper.
Caveats:
You MUST do 1 lesson EVERY day for 100 days. No skipping days or lessons.
You MUST read and understand the introduction and "teachers guide" before doing any of the lessons, or it isn't going to work.
The good news is that the lessons rarely take more than 15 minutes to complete, including preparation time.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book has not hampered our love of reading., Jan. 12 2004
By 
This review is from: Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons (Paperback)
This book helped my three year old DECODE the first couple of books in the Bob Book series after just 10 lessons! My daughter and I have had fun making these lessons our own "one on one" game time.
Children who know how to figure out "code" but have no skills in enjoying a book or comprehending it do not have this book to blame. A book or program can not replace a living example (parent or teacher) who is excited about reading and makes reading an adventure. A parent who reads to their child often will give their child a glimpse into a world full of adventure... and this book helps give the child their own key to that world.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Easy, enjoyable, and effective, Sept. 10 2014
This review is from: Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons (Paperback)
My three-year-old daughter is almost finished this book now. We're on lesson 79 or so I believe. She asked me to teach her how to read. I had an old Hooked on Phonics set and gave it a try, but I found she got into the habit of reading only the first letter and then guessing all of the words she knew that started with that letter. I read a recommendation for this book online, and I thought I would give it a try.
I really like the way this book is structured. It moves ahead so gradually that my child doesn't feel like it's too hard, and yet there is rapid improvement in her reading ability.
The first few times we attempted the book, she wasn't blurring the sounds together properly once they became whole words. I just put the book away and tried again a week or two later. One day it just clicked. I knew she was really ready at that point, and since then we have been doing a lesson everyday, and it has been a breeze.
After a lesson of reading sounds, then words, there is a story for the child to read and picture to test their comprehension. We cover the picture, and I find just wanting to see the picture is motivation enough for her to read through the whole story.
I highly recommend this book to anyone whose child has expressed an interest in reading at a young age or whose child may be struggling with reading at school.
Compared to many of the other products on the market, this book is really a bargain.
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Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons
Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons by Elaine Bruner (Paperback - June 15 1986)
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