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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Tale of MNC Domination
Whether you're a high schooler just taking interest in the plight of today's Multinational Corporations, or a member of the black-bloc fighting the front lines in Quebec City, this book is a must read. Klein takes aim at the brand phenomenon by dividing her book into four effective parts; NO SPACE, NO CHOICE, NO JOBS, and NO LOGO, going deep into the brief, yet storied...
Published on May 3 2001 by Jameel

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3.0 out of 5 stars Main arrow doesn't achieve the right target
I think that No Logo has a great hole in his theory. The problem is that Naomi Klein starts to write from this point: big multi-county brands are guilty for all the problems in South-east Asia and other countries where workers are not defended in their social, human and economic rights. Companies such as NIKE or GAP built a new business model where production is not the...
Published on Nov. 30 2001 by Giuseppe Rollino


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Tale of MNC Domination, May 3 2001
By 
Jameel (Toronto, ON, Canada) - See all my reviews
Whether you're a high schooler just taking interest in the plight of today's Multinational Corporations, or a member of the black-bloc fighting the front lines in Quebec City, this book is a must read. Klein takes aim at the brand phenomenon by dividing her book into four effective parts; NO SPACE, NO CHOICE, NO JOBS, and NO LOGO, going deep into the brief, yet storied history of the brand phenomenon, telling us why "superbrand" corporations dominate our economy today. Klein has basically taken everything you need to know about the anti-corporate movement, sprinkled it with some personal experience and great writing style, and has jammed it into one book that needs to be read by anyone even slightly concerned with the growing dominance of today's Multinational Corporations. While the book is quite lengthy and tends to get quite extensive in terms of detail, her anecdotal use is magnificent. The use of superbrand corporations in those anecdotes, such as McDonalds, Wal-Mart and Nike will keep the average reader interested, instead of the theory x/theory y business which I tend to find quite tedious to read. It will be well worth it to invest your time in reading this book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Makes you see the world differently, Feb. 6 2002
By 
Lleu Christopher (Hudson Valley, NY) - See all my reviews
No Logo is a book well worth reading no matter what your political persuasion. It will make you aware, or more aware, of just how pervasive the "branding" of the world has become. Naomi Klein's book is well-researched, well-organized and well-written. It deals with some quite complicated material, such as the interaction between various social and economic forces, while always remaining very readable and never lapsing into simplistic ideological rhetoric or academic-style jargon. No Logo documents the history of the brand in America, then goes on to explore various ways people have resisted the corporate domination of modern life. It's difficult to dispute that these are important issues. Finding a solution, however, is not such a simple matter. Klein is sophisticated enough to be skeptical of the very kind of activism she covers in No Logo. For example, she points out how boycotts of high profile companies such as Nike often benefits other equally guilty (of exploiting its Third World labor force) but lower profile companies. One question that No Logo doesn't directly tackle is whether significant curtailment of corporate power would really benefit people in the Third World. It's likely, for example, that if companies were forced to improve working conditions, they'd simply hire fewer workers. It's a complex situation, and a kind of Catch-22 for the world's poor, including those in affluent nations stuck in "McJobs". However, we can't fault Naomi Klein for not solving such a complex problem. I highly recommend No Logo as a thorough study of modern capitalism's impact on our culture. It also provides insight into a growing protest movement, one this book has certainly helped along. Most of all this book, whether you agree with all of it or not, brilliantly synthesizes many complex issues and reveals the underlying forces that connect them. It's a significant contribution to modern social theory.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I may disagree, but this is a fun and valuable book, Oct. 25 2001
By 
Robert J. Crawford (Balmette Talloires, France) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
WHile I worried that this was a simple ideological diatribe, I was very happily surprized at the intelligence and substance of Klein's book. It is a tough, well-reasoned manifesto for the anti-consumerism left of "Gen X." If you are wondering what was driving many of those protesters at the WTO and other summit meetings - most notoriously Seattle in late 1999 - then this book is the best place I know. It is part cultural critique, part economics and social policy, and partly a call to arms. Reading it has helped me to make sense of so much that I thought was simple, nihilistic anarchism. I was humbled to learn that there is far far more behind the movement than I had granted it.
In a nutshell, Klein argues that the "superbrands" - the huge corporations such as Disney and Nike - are progressively taking over virtually all "public spaces," including school curricula, neighborhoods, and all-encompassing infotainment malls like Virgin Megastores. THey are doing this in an attempt enter our minds as consumers in the most intimate ways, which Klein and others find unbearably intrusive. Moreover, she argues, as they subcontract overseas, the superbrands are leaving first-world workers behind while they exploit those in the developing world under horible conditions. It all adds up, she asserts, into a kind of emerging global worker solidarity that is developing new means (via internet exposes, protest campaigns, etc.) to push the superbrands to adopt more just policies and practices.
What was so amazing and useful for me, as a business writer looking at the same issues, is that Klein so often hones in on the underside of what I think are good and effective business practices: the development of brand values, globalisation of the production/value chain to lower prices, and the like. Often I may disagree with her take on things, but she makes too many insightful points to dismiss her and those whom she speaks for. I came to genuinely respect her as a thinker and writer.
Nonetheless, there were numerous omissions, some of which I must point out. First, while condemning exploitive labor practices in third-world sweat shops (which I do not deny exist), Klein fails to explore what the available alternatives are for these workers. Well, I went to Pakistan to examine one of the cases she addresses - children soccerball sewers - and I can say that their alternatives were all too often brick kilns or leather tanneries, both of which were far more dangerous and beyond the reach of international activists because the superbrands have nothing to do with them. Second, Klein tended to dismiss the efforts of MNCs out of hand, as weak sops designed more for PR purposes than to effect change. This is true for some groups, but again, while in Vietnam, I witnessed what I regarded as real social progress that came from the actions of a superbrand: upon hearing the demands and suggestions of a worker-safety inspector paid by adidas, Taiwanese sewing-machine manufacturers were approaching him for detailed design specifications to enhance their safety (driver-belt covers to protect against hand and hair injuries) and he had lots more ideas. However modest, that is real and concrete progress in my opinion.
Moreover, I believe that many of Klein's assertions are inaccurate or unproven. Is there really a mass movement growing out there? Is the clever defacing of huge advertisement boards really impacting pubic consciousness? Does everyone perceive the thrust of the brands as intrusive and poisonous? Is the World Trade Organization set up in a way that works in favor of the first world and against the third world? These are complex and very difficult questions. Finally, as a passionate activist, Klein rhetoric can get a bit overheated. At one point she says that IBM "otherwise impaled itself"; at another that Milton Friedman is a "architect of the global corporate takeover." What do these things mean? I may regard Friedman as a laughable free-market fundamentalist, but he is only a cloistered academic idoelogue, not a doer of any kind. Does throwing a cream pie in his face do anything more than shock adults?
In spite of these reservations, I can only applaud Klein for stirring up the pot of these issues, which provoke thought and encourage exploration, even by conservatives like me.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Economic feudalism, April 18 2002
By 
C. S. Webster (Auckland, New Zealand) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is a powerful and exceptionally well researched book which documents the economics of globalisation in frightening detail. The globalisation equation goes like this: first, sack as many of your US employees as possible, and certainly all of your employees which actually manufacture anything your company sells. Second, contract out your manufacturing to developing countries while putting political and economic pressure on the governments of those countries to keep the wages at below what anyone could possible live on. Your goods will be made in sweatshops under dangerous and sub-human conditions and each worker will cost you only cents an hour. Contracting out the manufacturing also conveniently distances you from the human rights violations involved. Third, import your goods back to the US and sell them for the same price or higher than you used to when they were made by Americans, but now cream in the 100's of percent higher profit margins. Fourth, pay yourself an annual bonus for increasing profits which is so large that it could support all, or most, of your sweatshop workers (in good conditions) for a decade or more of their lives. Fifth, couch your company's globalisation strategies in terms of increased efficiency and job provision in poor countries - perpetuate the myth that gobalisation is good for everyone. For an example of this equation: that "family values" company Disney pays its CEO $9,783 an hour, while their Haitian manufacturing workers get 28c a hour - at such a rate it would take a worker 16.8 years to earn the CEOs hourly income. In addition the CEO exercised $181 million of his stock options in 1996, which is enough to take care of his 19,000 Haitian workers and their families for 14 years! Welcome to the world of economic feudalism.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Globalisaster..., May 13 2002
By 
Globalisation is a very common word down at the street or in the media these days but you'll find very few in either "location" that can fully tell you what it means or, in the case of the media, are willing to.
But globalisation is supposedly our "future" if the plans of the money lords go as envisioned. This might not be very likely actually but that's a different story.
Ever wondered why your DVD player costs only $[money] or why your sneakers cost $[money] or why certain brand clothes also cost cheap? How could that be possible and what does it mean that most of such products (and others you might not be suspecting) are made primarily in Asia? "Respected" companies like Nike or Adidas contract out the manufacturing of their products to factories in Asia where workers work under , often, brutally unhuman conditions, 14 hour shifts, no benefits, and with shameful wages like 28 cents an hour..At the same time these and other companies try to pass out an image at home that tries to convince us how much they respect the "ideal of sport" or other such noble causes when in reality they are cynical exploiters of people all over the world and they dont omit to rip off their customers "at home"..
"No logo" is an exhaustive study of all this. Reading this book wont leave you the same person afterwards, especially if you dont have a very clear picture of all this situation. It will also leave you disgusted and wondering how many of these companies have actually suckered you.
But the most important message of this book goes out to those (and they are many) that say "hey, nothing can be done, you cant take these multinational giants on" and so forth. Not only does it show that a lot can be done but that a LOT has already been done and it demonstrates in detail what organisations in America and in the rest of the world are doing to change this predicament which is nothing short of a direct throw-back to medieval conditions for 1000s of workers around the world while CEOs are laughing at us, the customers, and on their way to the bank.
A must-read is an utter understatement for "No logo".
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A COncise, Revealing Look At The Branded World We Live In., Oct. 31 2001
By 
"wackytobaccee" (Coral Springs, FL United States) - See all my reviews
I work in the advertising/marketing industry, and, as such, began NO LOGO with a degree of salt: after all...I make my living writing and producing commercials for these so-called "evil" brands...the branding of America has reformed Times Square, promoted sports, and has been a part of our (formerly) strong economy.
What NO LOGO does (and does it with genius) is to reveal the truth beneath the logos...both the obvious truths (that corporations spend more money on image development than product development...overseas sweatshops have replaced American manufacturing) and those truths that are hard to find beneath the surface (that corporations are no longer responsible for their production AT ALL...everything is outsourced...that by eliminating the blue collar US jobs and replacing them with "permatemp" positions at retail outlets, brands/corporations have increased that proverbial gap between the haves and the have nots.)
Most importantly, NO LOGO discusses what is a serious issue affecting nearly every major metropolis in the United States today: the loss of non-branded public space. For example: if Yankee Stadium became Nissan Stadium, New York would be outraged...and yet, across the US, that branding of space is going on in droves...from the American Airlines Arena and the National Car Rental Center in South Florida...to "Busch Boulevard" in Virginia.
In short, NO LOGO changed my life. It certainly changed my career and where I choose to work. And what I choose to buy (although nearly EVERYTHING is made in a sweatshop.) Read it today.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We Love To See You Smile! [Indeed], April 16 2001
By 
Derek John Boland (Arlington, MA United States) - See all my reviews
Every day we are bombarded by the enormo-corp "buy, buy, buy" mantra. Think about it - we have organic billboards for Tommy & Nike in our schools, a clown selling us heart attacks and a perpetually retiring athlete shilling for whoever's offering. It is difficult for us to admit that such relentless marketing practices have burrowed into our psyche - but they have.
In lesser hands, 'No Logo' could have been an endless rant against 'the man'. But it isn't. Klein has fashioned a sane, often humorous book that looks at the extremely innocuous and down right scary marketing/social engineering experiments being conducted in the United States and beyond.
'No Logo' has plenty of spicy little mcnuggets that will get your blood boiling. For example, there is the deal that certain U.S. schools have made with McDonald's and Burger King [every participating school CANNOT have a generic burger available in the school canteen - effectively censoring those kids who can't afford a big Mac or Whopper!] Nice eh?
I can guarantee that once you have read 'No Logo' - you will not be able to pass one of those disturbingly omnipresent Gap billboards without smirking knowingly at the utter vapidity of it all. Take a stand against "the Brand" and read this book!
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Challenging and Sobering, Jan. 9 2004
By 
Jeff Strong (Hamilton, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies (Paperback)
No Logo is a sobering report on the current state of globalization and it's potential future impact. The nature of big business is ruthlessly criticized throughout (and rightly so), but is accomplished in such a mature and intelligent way that by the end of the book I was ready to participate in my first anti-globalization rally.
A must-have book for those seeking to understand this current phenomenon and how this process is unfolding for millions around the world.
A call to caution and economic reform, No Logo deserves a read by intelligent, thoughtful individuals concerned about the nature of society and culture at large.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars no logo; a wake up call for the masses, Dec 4 2001
By 
nikki anderson (liverpool, england) - See all my reviews
read this book and your eyes are opened to the carefully conditioned and constructed lives we live without even realising. Extensive research and a real passion for the subject is shown by the author and this passion is communicated to the reader. I defy anyone to read this book and look at the commercial and advertising world the same way again. You will feel empowered and the quest to further your knowledge, make a change and take control of your life will begin.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Extremely Enlightening, Nov. 5 2003
By 
Mike G Girardin (Kanata, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies (Paperback)
I picked up author Naomi Klein's book on a whim, after seeing it on sale at Amazon.ca. Thinking that it may give me some insight about the annoying protesters that I always hear about whenever there's some major world leaders conference, I brought it to the front and purchased it. I was pleasantly surprised by my purchase.
I've always been an anti-logo person. I wouldn't on my life be caught in a Tommy Hilfiger shirt, or GAP jeans, or even Nike shoes. I also know that personally, I am starting to find the loss of our public space and unbranded areas in my urban setting to be quite offensive. What <b>No Logo</b> did for me, was to help me look deep into these corporations mindsets, to understand what is happening, and figure out exactly what is wrong with these aggressive tactics, and the best means to channel the rage I have against these multinationals.
The book is very well researched, and it is written in a very easy-to-read manner. The ideas flow nicely one into the other, and there are a lot of ideas explored in this book, while more times than not both sides of an argument are presented.
There were times, however, were the author uses the book as her own personal platform for other issues she seems to feel strongly about. From her feminist views to the ones rights for Jewish Lesbians, I sometimes felt that her rants had no place in the book. But these were pretty minimal, and easily overlooked.
During the course of the book, I found myself wondering what I could do to help in many situations, and there are definitely answers to these questions. I was also pleased that these answers didn't come in the form of promoting the radical protests that a lot of boringly average middle-class kids with nothing better to do seem to have embraced.
To reiterate what I wrote at the beginning of this review, it was an interesting and powerful book, and well worth picking up. If not for the research that went into it, at least to understand how each and every one of this huge ruthless corporation are affecting your everyday lives and freedoms.
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No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies
No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies by Naomi Klein (Paperback - Dec 4 2000)
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