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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Suite Francaise...a war time masterpiece!
A wonderful novel!

This is a war time story by Irene Nemirovsky; Irene Nemirovsky, a Jew, died in a concentration camp in Auschwitz on Aug 17, 1942. This magnificent manuscript remained virtually forgotten for more than 60 years after the authors death. It tells of the early war years (1940-1941) with the Germans having just defeated the French army and...
Published on Aug. 15 2006 by R. Nicholson

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars German invasion of France WWII
While reading Suite Francaise, I was expecting a plot, any plot, to thicken, but was disappointed.
Too many characters, all being members of "the privileged few" looking down on ordinary folks,
thinking that the elite is better than all those poor souls.

I had never read any Irene Nermirovsky and will keep away from her works...
Published 14 months ago by Bridget Moran-Klapwijk


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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Suite Francaise...a war time masterpiece!, Aug. 15 2006
By 
R. Nicholson - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Suite Francaise (Hardcover)
A wonderful novel!

This is a war time story by Irene Nemirovsky; Irene Nemirovsky, a Jew, died in a concentration camp in Auschwitz on Aug 17, 1942. This magnificent manuscript remained virtually forgotten for more than 60 years after the authors death. It tells of the early war years (1940-1941) with the Germans having just defeated the French army and occupying northern France.

The novel is broken into 2 sections. The first section, "Storm in June", deals with the story of about half a dozen persons and their immediate family or associates. Initially, it's an account of these soon-to-be refugees trying to endure the collective humiliation of a nation devastated by their recent defeat in the war; but it is more than this, it is really about the individual changes and personal hardships that are thrust upon hordes of unprepared poor, middle and upper middle class people. Charity, compassion and fair play are thrown out the window and replaced with greed, hoarding and personal survival (at any cost). A striking change in life's values when " the chips are down".

The second part of the novel, "Dolce", was my favorite and I felt, the most beautiful part. It is, in essence, two different love stories. One between a German officer, billeted in a small French home, and a middle class French women and the other, a more generalized affair between the occupiers and the conquered. Over the course of their 3 month occupation the Germans soldiers, despite their attempts to act civilly and integrate with the villagers, have difficulty understanding why the people of the village don't accept them, and in turn, the villagers, who initially will have nothing to do with the invaders, begin to actually like and even admire some of these "foreigners" by the time they depart to the new Russian front. This second section was well written and beautifully told; something to be appreciated and savored, like good wine.

Two appendices contain some hand written notes by the author made while conceiving this novel and also some correspondence between the author and associates dated in 1942. Another section at the back of this book gives a brief resume of the authors life.

All in all a magnificent novel. Highly recommended! 5 stars.

P.S. If you enjoyed this book as much as I did then I'd humbly suggest reading "The Book Thief" by Markus Zusak. Another novel of the same time era; beautifully written, movingly sad, but yet a pleasure to read. R.A.N.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars World War II Historical Fiction, April 12 2009
This review is from: Suite Francaise (Paperback)
Irene Nemirovsky had already published several acclaimed and popular novels during her lifetime before starting Suite Francaise which was published posthumously after her daughter had finally decided to overcome the painful associations and get it to a publisher. The book consists of two novellas, Tempete En Juin and Dolce, which were actually supposed to be part of a series of five novellas. For the third, Captivite, there exists an outline but for the fourth and fifth only titles, Batailles and La Paix, remain. Nemirovsky died at Auschwitz before the series could be completed.
Suite Francaise spans the period from early June, 1940 to July, 1941. The first novella describes the experiences of the French as the Germans swept into France and Paris, easily defeating the French army. Scenes of bombings, families struggling to stay together, individuals trying to acquire gas, food and lodgings to mount a successful escape all fill this section.
The second novella portrays the attempts of the Germans and the French citizens to form some sort of harmonious coexistence and to deal with the inevitable tensions and conflicts that arise. French girls yearn toward young German soldiers as French mothers carefully and fearfully guard their offspring against this sort of intrusion. German soldiers share personal lives and money in attempts at friendship while at the same time posters proclaim a steady series of rules whose violation results in immediate death through the firing squad.
There is a large German celebration that is mounted, and then suddenly a good portion of the troops get ready for redeployment at the Russian front.
The story that links Dolce with the subsequent novellas concerns Benoit who kills a German soldier after one of his hidden rifles is found. He flees and is hidden by a French woman who will later take him to Paris to join the communist, resistance movement.
The book is written from the point of view of the French civilian population as a conquering army intrudes on years of established relationships and customs. There is a haunting and painfully sensitive attention to detail within the narrative.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A gripping story, May 22 2006
By 
Edwin (Phoenix, Arizona, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Suite Francaise (Hardcover)
A moving biographical story of French author Irene Nemirovsky. Beautifully presented by her daughter who survived the horrors of World War II, this biography is a presentation of secretly hidden works and memory of Nemirovsky, a Ukrainian born Jewish woman, who moved to Paris from Kiev with her family as a child. She became popular from her 1929 novel, DAVID GOLDER, which later became a play and a film. Arrested by French police and deported to Auschwitz in 1942, she died that year in Auschwitz , the same camp where her husband was gassed .However, her two daughters survived to reveal their mother's papers in THE WATCHTOWER, one of Irene's daughters tells the story of the family, the suitcase, and her mother's murder. Suite Francaise, the first two parts of what Irene Nemirovsky originally intended to be a five-volume epic, has been hailed by ecstatic French critics as "a masterpiece" and "probably the definitive novel of our nation in the second world war ."That is 62 years after Irene Nemirovsky's murder. Rights to the work have already been sold in 18 countries.Equally captivating are DISCIPLES OF FORTUNE, EXODUS, UNION MOUJIK ,MILA 18 for mirroring the strength in all of us that can be harnessed if given the motivation.
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3.0 out of 5 stars German invasion of France WWII, Jan. 29 2013
By 
Bridget Moran-Klapwijk (Calgary, Alberta Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Suite Francaise (Paperback)
While reading Suite Francaise, I was expecting a plot, any plot, to thicken, but was disappointed.
Too many characters, all being members of "the privileged few" looking down on ordinary folks,
thinking that the elite is better than all those poor souls.

I had never read any Irene Nermirovsky and will keep away from her works.

Sorry, this book has not inspired me one bit!
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4.0 out of 5 stars A compelling gripping book that had me hungry to read more, Oct. 11 2007
This review is from: Suite Francaise (Paperback)
I was transported back to war torn France and walked the dusty roads to the concentration camps with other prisoners or so it seemed. How lucky was I to be able to imagine and not recount from personal experience. The author has a story to tell and elegantly she succeeds allowing generations after her to know what it was like for people caught up in such madness. I took this book along with two others on holiday and settled down on the hot sands to read, I was unprepared for such a brilliant read. I must also recommend THE FATES by Tino Georgiou his book captured my attention as diligently as Suite Francaise.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another side to war, Jan. 20 2007
By 
Ian Gordon Malcomson (Victoria, BC) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Suite Francaise (Hardcover)
Here are some compelling reasons for reading this book:

A. You're looking for a fresh perspective on the psychology of international conflicts like war. This story offers to take you inside the mindset of a French village as it copes with daily grind of living under German occupation during WW II;

B. You need to take a fresh look at some of the issues of war like collaboration as they impact individuals and communities. This story covers both sides of key differences in a very reasonable manner, so that the reader can identify closely with the awkward dilemma accompanying each critical decision.

C. You want to read an account of war that covers every day, down-to-earth affairs, and is not forever dominated by the themes of violence,terror,heroism and political intrigue. Nemirovsky has written just that kind of novel that allows for both a comfortable yet thought-provoking read.

D. Well written and worth the read.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A solid five stars, July 2 2006
This review is from: Suite Francaise (Hardcover)
If you're looking for a "light" summer read---this ain't it. Choose instead something easy and fun--you know, such as "Katzenjammer" by McCrae or the favorite "Secret Life of Bees." Now, that said, SUITE FRANCAISE is popular because of two things: It's well written, and it's a great story. Trust me--the two don't always go hand-in-hand. Nemirovsky was an immigrant from a family that was quite wealthy and who had to flee the Bolsheviks as a youngster. She then went to France and was shipped to Auschwitz at one point. Enter the gist of the story. This, for me, was something like a cross between "The Diary of Anne Frank" and "Schindler's List," though really on its own terms. I would recommend this book, but might also suggest the recent hit "Night" by Weissel.

If you want a great book that will move you, SUITE FRANCAISE is it. If you want a light summer read, might I suggest "Katzenjammer" by McCrae or the book "Life of Pi."
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sweet Francaise, March 11 2007
This review is from: Suite Francaise (Hardcover)
I suppose all the hype over this book didn't help, however, I must say that I was marginally disappointed that it wasn't as great as I thought it was supposed to be. It was well written and interesting. However, it is not necessarily "memorable" in the sense that I'd refer someone to read it. The appendices added value, and perhaps had it not been for them, I would rate it as a three star read. It was interesting to see what direction the book could have taken if it were finished.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Beautiful and moving, April 27 2011
This review is from: Suite Francaise (Hardcover)
I really enjoyed reading these two books (published in one book) set in WWII France, written by someone experiencing WWII France while they were writing. I loved the way that all the seemingly diverse characters intersect and bring you so many different points of view. I wish that the author had survived the war, and been able to share with us the last novels that she had planned.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A work in progress, Aug. 24 2009
By 
Andrea (Ontario, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Suite Francaise (Paperback)
This novel has a really fascinating history and the longer I tried to figure out how to review it, the harder it got because my thoughts about the work itself are so closely tied to its history. How do you review a work that isn't actually finished? Suite Francaise is only two parts of a sweeping novel that Nemirovsky had planned to be a five part, 1000 page epic. She was writing about WWII as it was happening, and died at Auschwitz before completing the remaining three parts. The appendix contains Nemirovsky's notes detailing her plans for Suite Francaise so readers get an idea of how the two parts were to fit into the overall story, but as it is, it is a work in progress.

The first of the two books in the Suite is 'Storm in June', which recounts the experience of various families and couples fleeing Paris during the German invasion in June of 1940. Nemirovsky tells the story mainly from the perspective of the rich, self-absorbed upper classes, who are more concerned about saving their linens and family china than about the fact that life as they know it is ending. It makes for a striking contrast against the refugees they encounter who are forced to leave Paris with nothing but the clothes on their backs, and the ones who had to make the journey on foot, hiding in ditches to avoid the bombs. According to the appendix, this was deliberate, and it works; I really disliked most of the characters and wanted to give their heads a shake. The pace of the story is brisk, not too much description of scenery or too many lengthy meditations, which I felt was appropriate to the circumstances ' people are living minute to minute, never knowing when or where the next bomb will hit or if they'll make it to the next town.

The second story, 'Dolce', takes place a year later in a small country village under German occupation. This one is slower paced, more reflective, giving us a look at brief period of calm during the war. A few of the characters introduced in 'Storm' appear again here, though only in passing. In this one, a young French woman, whose husband has been taken prisoner by the Germans, falls in love with the German officer living with her and her mother-in-law. I liked 'Dolce' better than 'Storm', I think because the characters in this one were more likeable and there was some more depth to the story.

All in all, I think my expectations may have been too high going into this because I came away feeling kind of disappointed. And here is where it gets tough to review properly, because these stories were not meant to stand on their own so I feel like I'm not being fair. After reading the appendix and Nemirovsky's notes, I can see where she was going with the Suite and I think it would have brilliant if she'd been able to complete it. In the context of the overall story that she wanted to tell, 'Storm' and 'Dolce' are a perfect set-up and very smartly done, so I'm basing my rating on that. I read that Nemirovsky's plan for this Suite and the way that she'd structured it was inspired by Beethoven's Fifth Symphony...what a tragedy it is that she wasn't able to finish it.
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Suite Francaise
Suite Francaise by Irene Nemirovsky (Paperback - April 10 2007)
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