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5.0 out of 5 stars A Must-Read!
'Sons And Lovers' is perhaps the most touching classic by D H Lawrence. The story revolves around the Morel family, a lower-middle class family living on the Nottingham coalfield. Initially, Lawrence vividly describes the hardships faced by Mrs. Morel in raising a family of three sons and a daughter while living from hand to mouth, in face of the frequent beatings...
Published on Nov. 18 2003

versus
1.0 out of 5 stars bad quality paper and print
While I love D.H Lawrence, i should have chosen almost any other copy to read it. This one has terrible paper quality, very small and not a very legible print.
Published 9 months ago by Anastasia


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4.0 out of 5 stars Great!, June 1 2002
By A Customer
I hated most of the characters, but I still loved this novel. It kept me interested the whole three days it took to read. Definitely read this book!
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2.0 out of 5 stars I Guess I Just Don't Like DH Lawrence, May 9 2002
By 
Bill (Albuquerque, New Mexico United States) - See all my reviews
This is the second Lawrence novel I have read, the first being Lady Chatterly's Lover. I didn't really like it to much but I recognized the man had talent. He has some of the most elegant prose I have ever read. I heard this is a superior novel and much more profound so I decided to give it a whirl.
Basically I couldn't stand it. I admit his writing is great, but I just can't get into this. Maybe it's the subject matter which is kind of strange, or maybe it's just personal taste, I don't know for sure. I am a great fan of literature of all kinds, but the period of writing from 1910-1925 I don't seem to enjoy. Sure Joyce wrote some ingenious things, Hemmingway was a great romantic writer but the stuff just doesn't click with me. Oh well, I gave the book 2 stars because I enjoyed the prose, but that is all I enjoyed.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Incredible Piece of Literature, Nov. 26 2001
By 
Taken at face value, this is a high caliber novel. Reading into it and discussing it with others elucidates many otherwise obfuscated themes and story lines. I recommend this book especially for students who are able to devote significant time to it and who are able to analyze it with others. If you do not have time for this pithy tome or have no one with whom to talk, don't bother buying.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Confused emotions of human psyche..., Aug. 18 2001
By 
Ayse (Turkey/Istanbul) - See all my reviews
This review is from: SONS AND LOVERS. (Paperback)
This is really a book of psychological analysis. It's not exactly an autobiography but Lawrence makes a good deal self-eveluation of his childhood.When you read the novel you feel in an instant that someone who can describe human conditions that successfully,must have lived it all himself.Paul's excessive attachment to his mother and how his life became unbearable after her death shows the human helplessness.He tries over and over to LOVE someone other than his mother but each time he finds some missing part which is fullfilled by his mother. He really loves Miriam but somehow love also falls short to live happily-ever-after. When I first started the book I felt that the main character was Mrs.Morel. I was mistaken. Lawrence used all of the characters with nearly equal emphasis.Of course the leading one is Paul. On the other hand you take lots of things from other characters by his clear depiction. Paul,thus Lawrence, is a good psychologist.If you like to find your own thougts and feelings told by an author you should read Sons And Lovers.I finished it in a week.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Freud would have fun with this...., July 9 2001
By 
Jeffrey Leeper "kem2070" (Seattle, WA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: SONS AND LOVERS. (Paperback)
The Wordsworth Classics are a fairly good editions of some of the classics. Being mass-market paperbacks, they are easy to carry around. The only problem I would have with this is that there is not a lot of room in the margins for making notes about the text. There is some room, but you would need to write small. I would recommend this edition above others if you just wanted to read the story with really studying it.
D.H. Lawrence wrote this in a time which also saw Sigmund Freud start with his writings of Oedipal conflict and motivation. A reader from today will start thinking about how much fun Freud would have with this within the first few chapters.
I would have to say that I have not read a lot of D.H. Lawrence, but this book has convinced me to read more. The actions Paul, the main character, takes tell you what is happening, but if you look at the imagery of nature around them, you will have another idea of what is going on. Lawrence is a great writer. Look at the flowers when Paul and Clara have finished walking the slippery path by the river. Look closely at the flowers that are given to Clara when they stop for tea.
I would recommend this book to anyone. If you are a student, I might recommend using a journal for your notes or getting a used copy of another edition which has larger margins.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Pain mixed with happiness, June 19 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: SONS AND LOVERS. (Paperback)
Sons and Lovers tells the story of the Morels, which are the counterpart of the authors own family. It is in this book where D.H. Lawrence explores probably for the first time the circumstances and conditions of his youth in order to set himself free of the shadows of the past. The dominant, omnipresent influence of his mother ­ a tie so strong he is hardly able to bear her death. So strong he almost chooses to follow her into the immense night which engulfed her. «And if he walked and walked for ever, there was only that place to come to» ­ the place where his dead mother was awaiting him. Yet in the end, facing the seduction of death, he turns around and walks towards the light ­ «the faintly humming, glowing town» ­ thus deciding to continue the path of his life, alone but free. The story of a mother with an unfulfilled life and a marriage that was failure, too. A mother that substitutes her own life by the lives of her sons, making their success her victory. The victory that will make her triumph over the share of life she didn¹t get. Mrs Morel takes possession her sons of the lives, especially of Paul¹s (the counterpart of D.H. Lawrence). And by doing so she casts a shadow on all of Paul¹s actions, thoughts, and experiences. Everything he will do he will do it, in the end for his mother. This pressure, this shadow makes it impossible for him to see the light which would lead him along the path of his life and therefore his youth becomes a struggle, a fight against himself. He falls in love, but eventually he isn¹t able to love. The mother, sitting at home, jealous, is his conscience and she wouldn¹t allow anybody to come close to him. And so we see Paul grow up, a person bursting of life yet unable to live. With passion he falls in love, the passion though turns into pain. Pain, the keyword of the book, penetrates every chapter. A sensitive soul, deeply connected with nature, caught in torture. «He felt as if his blood was melting into tears» or his vision of a sunset: «Gold flamed to scarlet, like pain in its intense brightness» make us feel how the world of Paul utterly dissolves into torment and struggle. A book that is the vision of pain, not without any happiness, but always a happiness based on pain. This vision comes to us so real, so profound and sincere that the book seems to me an approach on life itself.
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4.0 out of 5 stars slow start, brilliant end, June 18 2001
By 
K (Maryland) - See all my reviews
The first half of the book I wasn't quite sure what Lawrence was building up to, but the rest is brilliant. I think the Oedipal aspects of the book are overhyped. Though certainly they are important to Paul's character.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Novel, June 4 2001
This review is from: Sons and Lovers (Paperback)
This book renewed my belief in the power of love. D.H. Lawrence seems very romantic, yet tragic at the same time. This was very pleasurable reading. "Sons and Lovers" and "War and Peace" by Leo Tolstoy are my two biggest recommendations for anyone who enjoys classic fiction. I purchased the "Modern Library 100 Best Novels" version of this book, which conveniently lists the rest of Modern Library's 100 Best Novels on the front cover.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Here I Go...., May 23 2001
I know this review is going to sound markedly unintelligent, but I really can't help it in this case. I'm going to say what I need to say about this book, whether it makes a helpful review or not.
Let me get one thing straight first: Sons and Lovers does not flow in the way Lawrence's other works flow. Each scene does not seem to bind itself to the next to make a perfect, seamless whole. The book does lag at times, in fact. It is beautifully written but not 'perfectly' written like Lawrence's other works. I am not rating this book on its composition, though. I'm rating it for something else.
I'm wondering if anyone else felt the same way I felt when I read this novel. I have never before had to lay down a book in mid-paragraph and put my head in my hands for sheer emotional inability to read any further that day. I've read authors whose works hold up a mirror to an entire society, to a clique, to a cult, or a nation, but NEVER have I seen an author hold up a mirror to common individuals like myself. Quite honestly, I have never felt so horrible and so sickened with MYSELF simply because I read a book.
What IS it about this story that makes me feel this way? I can only say that Lawrence must have been an expert at inner self-examination and observance of society. When I say society, I don't mean of 'the English,' or 'the Americans' or 'the-anything.' I mean of 'people.' There must be aspects of all human beings that will never change through time, age, gender, and economic status, because Lawrence captures each and every little thought, feeling, and nuance of human emotion and throws it as us in this book. The effect is a screaming recognition of yourself (at least, of myself.) 'Oh my God, that IS me!' I sympathize with Miriam, I sympathize with Paul, with Lily, with William, with Gertrude, and, God help me, with Walter Morel. I see myself in them.
Lawrence may want us to feel negatively toward Miriam at times, but those are the times when I most identify with her. She may be a 'soul sucker,' but I know that I am, too. Mrs. Morel hates Miriam for this overbearing quality, but there's the clincher:I, too, hate the people who try to suck the souls of the people whose 'souls' I want.
In less ridiculous language, Lawrence uses the relationship between Miriam and Paul to lay the inevitable facts about human jealousy and possessiveness in front of our eyes. We all have thoughts, desires, and jealousies so 'embarrassing' or so shameful that we won't even voice them in our mind's ear. These are the thoughts that will make us weak or despicable if we acknowledge or accept them. Lawrence makes these hidden thoughts and feelings a part of his writing style. When he describes his characters, you'd better BELIEVE he describes them. He leaves nothing out. They are weak, stupid, good, beautiful, and hopeless. I hate to seeing myself in his characters just as much as I hate being like them.
Nearly all of Lawrence's works are like this, it is true, but this was the first of them that really slapped me in the face and made me see myself (and most likely everyone else) for what I really am.
It's a good book. Very powerful, sad, embarrassing, and dangerous. Everyone should read it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic, Feb. 11 2001
By 
Tom Munro "tomfrombrunswick" (Melbourne, Victoria Australia) - See all my reviews
Sons and Lovers is a book that has been set for years in school for children to read. Somehow doing this usually means that most people emerge with a hatred of it but Lawrence's book is of such quality that it is able to survive.
It is about a woman who marries a coal miner someone who is below her class. While he is young there is some joy in her life but as she grows older the class differences create a wall between them. She lives for her two male children who she tried to keep out of the mines and to ensure that they can live middle class lives. As she grows older the children become more important to her. The death of the oldest means that she suffocates the younger son with a love that affects his normal development.
The story is told through the eyes of the younger son. There is little question that the novel is autobiographical and based on the early life of Lawrence. His life is almost identical to the events portrayed in the novel.
Lawrence was a prolific novelist and short story reader but this work is probably his most accessible. His later novels tended to be more about peoples relationships but without the social content.
Nowadays the class issues have receded a bit into the background. At the time of its publication the book would have been seen as revealing the divisions that operated in Britain. Most critics tend to focus on the relationship of Lawrence and his mother as the primary focus of the novel. To some extent this is true but the book is much more. It is a portrait of a society thankfully now gone. It is the portrait of a young man being propelled by his mother to escape his fathers destiny. Unlike Lawrence's other books which have tended to date this book is easy to read and still a classic.
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Sons and Lovers
Sons and Lovers by D. H. Lawrence (Hardcover - Nov. 26 1991)
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