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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rich book
This is the second James Joyce book I have read and it goes to reinforce the feeling I had after reading the first that that writer is a great storyteller. In fact, I consider
James Joyce's Dubliners as one of the best collection of short stories ever put together. The settings are amazing and the rich and lively characters all combine with the incredible plots to...
Published on July 29 2005 by Sancho Mahle

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3.0 out of 5 stars Not reader friendly
The book is a series of short stories about different groups of people in Dublin, Ireland. Joyce uses these short stories to expose the social wrongs and paralysis of morals around the turn of the 20th century in Dublin. All of the stories end in tragedy, sadness, or continuation of a previous wrong. James Joyce's Dubliners was an interesting book, to say the least. At...
Published on March 23 2001 by Aaron McCoy


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A rich book, July 29 2005
By 
Sancho Mahle (Charlotte, USA) - See all my reviews
This is the second James Joyce book I have read and it goes to reinforce the feeling I had after reading the first that that writer is a great storyteller. In fact, I consider
James Joyce's Dubliners as one of the best collection of short stories ever put together. The settings are amazing and the rich and lively characters all combine with the incredible plots to add credence to the stories. Not only are they true to life in fitting with the atmosphere that one finds in Dublin, the stories are also hilarious, subtle, and inspirational and gripping. The pace of the stories is fast and the voices are rich. This is a highly recommended read along with UNION MOUJIK, FINNEGANS WAKE, THE USURPER AND OTHER STORIES,ICE ROAD, DISCIPLES OF FORTUNE
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yes, the newspapers were right: snow was general all over Ireland., Aug. 8 2012
The title of my review comes from the last paragraph of "The Dead," already mentioned by previous critics as one of the great short stories of English literature. In a way, this line reflects Joyce's collection as a whole: much in the way a newspaper collects concise, level-headed, yet crisp glimpses into the times of a people, his book has tried to achieve a similar feat. 'Dubliners' aims for objectivity that differs slightly from journalism. Quite similar to Hemingway's scientific approach to writing, Joyce has tried to establish an objective approach to fiction that provides minimal judgment of the content, while maximizing the efficacy of its characters, images, and stories.

With the Modernists, literature begins to shift away from the hoity-toity implied authors so popular in the Victorian Era. (Dickens is most famous for this, though I think the words "hoity-toity" are ironic according to his intentions, but right-on in terms of his prose style.) T.S. Eliot was infamous for saying that a writer must banish himself from what he writes. One question I always have is this: can that actually happen? Surely, the very act of writing, where details are selected, ordered, and described has to accord with someone's vision. Perhaps the implied author that readers can picture so clearly from the Victorian Era instead becomes a "ghost author"--or, as Joyce so eloquently puts it in 'A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man": "The artist, like the God of the creation, remains within or behind or beyond or above his handiwork, invisible, refined out of existence, indifferent paring his fingernails." This makes the act of composition one of inevitable consumption, both by the editing process and the reading process.

So the odd type of objectivity Joyce and Eliot herald is actually an objective-subjectivity, if that makes any sense. Richard Ellman wrote a biography on Joyce, and referred to this as sympathetic detachment, making it much more in line with Buddhism.

Back to 'Dubliners'. Why is this kind of authorial approach so important? You could say that Joyce is trying to illustrate Dublin as a city caught in paralysis, and that his "objective" style complements his subject matter. Before Joyce finished writing "The Dead," he felt that his work was perhaps unfair to the city where he used to live. "The Dead" is therefore an attempt by Joyce to elevate his city away from its moments of mistaken love, poetic abandon, romantic tragedy and maternal agony to find whether he can galvanize sympathy for it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Dubliners, Dec 12 2003
By 
HORAK (Zug, Switzerland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Dubliners (Paperback)
Joyce's book depicts episodes of middle-class Catholic life in Dublin at the beginning of last century; "Dubliners" was first published in 1914. The topics related in the opening stories range from the disappointments of childhood, the frustrations of adolescence and the importance of sexual awakening. Joyce was 25 when he wrote this miscellaneous collection of short stories, among which "The Dead" is probably the most famous. Considered at the time as a literary experiment, they are refreshingly original and astonishing ant the beginning of this century as they were at the beginning of last century!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Exile in Loveville, Dec 5 2003
By 
Jimmy Chen (San Francisco) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Dubliners (Paperback)
Exile is Joyce's major theme in both Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Dubliners. In the former, it was self-induced exile, an imperative coming of age story. In Dubliners, the exile is moral and psychological. Each character in these stories linger on the crest of transcendence-- all of them wanting more, but too tired, scared, and resigned to do anything about it. While this may seem cynical and drab, Joyce's love for the human spirit resonates deeply with each described gesture, however sad they may be.
'An Encounter' follows a boy on the beach, having cut a day of school with his brutish friend, who meets an old man and is in turn humiliated by what he witnesses, only to retreat back to his friend, who he secretly despises. In 'Araby' a young boy begs to go to a fair in order to buy a trinket for a girl he is smitten for, and having arrived minutes too late, cannot bring himself to it when he is met by an apathetic saleslady. 'A Painful Case' is about a lonely man who, self-deluded that he is content, rejects his lover after an ephemeral tryst. He continues to bear the isolation, though the outcome for the distraught woman is much more tragic. The last story, 'The Dead', is of a husband who, after a funeral procession, is awakened to his own mortality and the transience of life, and rekindles in his heart a flame for his wife, only to discover she is distracted by her own thoughts of another man.
Joyce is not merely interested in sad stories. When the story ends, the love each character had continues onward after the page is turned. These stories mirror common failures of our own lives and give meaning to them, as if our own stories, however menial and benign, are worth being told.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars under my expectations, Aug. 11 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Dubliners (Paperback)
I was expecting a little more from this work. A few stories I just did not understand the point, they just never reached any climax. On the other hand, even the weakest items still put me in the scene and captured an atmoshphere which most short fiction collections cant.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Liked it so much, I read it again., June 7 2001
By 
L. M Prestwidge (South Pasadena, CA United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Dubliners (Hardcover)
Little snippets of life among the Irish working class. I read this book for the first time in my early 20's. Although I enjoyed it then, I liked it even more ten years later. This is one of those books that you appreciate more when you have some life experiences to compare it with.
Good strong believable characters and a subtle writing style that let's you draw your own conclusions.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Poetry as Prose, April 6 2001
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This review is from: Dubliners (Mass Market Paperback)
This is a wonderful collection of stories by the unique James Joyce. This book reads like impressionism on paper, painting transcendent watercolors with language. Each story is a portrait of Dublin life, but the Dublin portrayed here could have been any city in the world, full of pain, joy, laughter, sadness, regret, and Humanity. This book is the best place to start with Joyce, because the narrative hasn't developed into the ambiguity found in later works such as Ulysses. For first-timers, Dubliners is the Joycean work that is most friendly and affecting. But it's still miles away from any other author's work (Including JOyce's own).
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Huddled by the fire, Jan. 5 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Dubliners (Hardcover)
James Joyce sketches in a few deft words, the lives of characters who inhabit the homes in Dublin a hundred years ago. There are young people who are trapped by tradition, religion, their own limitations. Adults don't fare much better. But it's all in the telling: the marvellous word choice, the weaving of image, the interplay of characters who are unable to set each other free. Joyce can breathe life into players with a few strokes, letting Polly Mooney seduce as a "perverse Madonna", having Mangan's sister play the strings of a young man's heart as she would a harp. Hope for a brighter future flickers in the final story of the collection, where friends and family gather at the feast, their spirits rise and Ireland reaches out to embrace her wounded.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Engaging Short Stories, Feb. 23 2013
James Joyce's short stories render turn of the century Dublin and Dubliners for readers who want to ease into the work of the guy who wrote Ulysses. The Dubliners is highly recommended. A couple of these tales even brought a tear to my eye; wonderfully evocative.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Master Storyteller, June 28 2004
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This review is from: Dubliners (Mass Market Paperback)
James Joyce's Dubliners is one of the best collection of short stories ever penned. The characters are memorable, the plots are subtle, gripping and frequently ironic, the atmosphere of "dear dirty Dublin" rings true, and the writing is eloquent and disciplined. While his novels (e.g. Ulysses) get more attention, Dubliners may be his best work. Highly recommended.
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Dubliners
Dubliners by James Joyce (Hardcover - Nov. 26 1991)
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