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5.0 out of 5 stars If you liked The Rules Of Attraction...
then you will like The Informers. I loved The Rules Of Attraction (and also all of Bret Easton Ellis's books), and I came across this little book and I dove right in. Some of these stories are Easton's best writing, and his characters are STILL unlikable, and they do stupid stuff like drugs, and all that other mess. With these characters; and like most of Bret characters,...
Published on May 14 2004 by Eric

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3.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining Depiction of a Moral Wasteland
The format of this book is a little strange, because it's not exactly a novel or a collection of short stories, but something in between. The book is made up of a series of vignettes told through the viewpoints of a variety of characters who inhabit the same social circles in Los Angelos. The stories often overlap, and a peripheral character in one vignette is often the...
Published on Sept. 27 2003 by Douglas King


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5.0 out of 5 stars If you liked The Rules Of Attraction..., May 14 2004
By 
Eric (El Sobrante, CA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Informers (Paperback)
then you will like The Informers. I loved The Rules Of Attraction (and also all of Bret Easton Ellis's books), and I came across this little book and I dove right in. Some of these stories are Easton's best writing, and his characters are STILL unlikable, and they do stupid stuff like drugs, and all that other mess. With these characters; and like most of Bret characters, they always do coke or smoke a joint afterwards.
In one of the stories, it has a touch of American Psycho which Jamie who is a vampire who drinks human blood and murders his victims brutally, like what Patrick Bateman did. The book mostly contend of characters who live in the same city; Los Angeles, and they get their drugs from the same dealers, and they went to the same school. They dont know each other, but all of the characters in this book have a lot in common which is some of the things I just mentioned. Of course the stories I found out ruled, and it was different because Bret likes to ramble into detail; like he did in American Psycho, but he didnt do it that much. Also you could tell by reading the book that Bret had a couple of problems when writing their characters when they are talking. They would stop. Pause. and begin again. Does this make the book bad? No of course not. But this is some good stuff. Worth checking out, and another point, a couple of names in this book; Tim Price, Sean Bateman, are mentioned and if you read The Rules Of Attraction and American Psycho you would know these two characters already. If you dont, then read TROA and AP.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A novel broken up into short stories.... Perfect!, Jan. 4 2004
By 
Photopro "Mike" (purcellville, va United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Informers (Paperback)
For his fourth book, Ellis once again was able to shock us with his stories of the young and rich in L.A. But this time, with "The Informers" Ellis took a different route to grip us with. Instead of writing a full novel, we get thirteen short stories of several characters that are introduced in the first two chapters, either by being in that chapter, or being a name in passing.
As in his other stories, Ellis brings in names and characters that have been used in other of his works, making all of his books intertwined in small ways. I found this book to read a lot more like "Less Than Zero" than his other works, mainly because the characters go to the same schools and know each other, and are the same age.
The are three main charachters that the short stories are mainly based around and the shorts in this book range over a time period of roughly two to three years, putting you before and after major events.
This book is something only Ellis could achieve. Taking normal lives of teens and adults alike and showing us their rich, corrupt and disappointing lives. From divorce, to random sex with lovers and friends, to the mind of a boy who believes he is a vampire.
This is another perfect piece of literature that will no doubt become another Ellis classic.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining Depiction of a Moral Wasteland, Sept. 27 2003
By 
Douglas King (Cincinnati, OH United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Informers (Paperback)
The format of this book is a little strange, because it's not exactly a novel or a collection of short stories, but something in between. The book is made up of a series of vignettes told through the viewpoints of a variety of characters who inhabit the same social circles in Los Angelos. The stories often overlap, and a peripheral character in one vignette is often the main character in another story. In terms of content, it pretty much follows the same themes as "American Psycho" and "The Rules of Attraction": immoral, spoiled, self-absorbed and mostly soulless people living in the early 80's, and having difficulty connecting with or relating to anyone else. This gives the entire book a depressing, bleak tone, but it is also somehow entertaining. Towards the end of the book, a couple of the stories take on a supernatural turn that neither of the other books did, which makes finishing the book worthwhile. Overall, I found the book entertaining, though it is far from being a masterpiece.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Worth purchasing on Amazon, July 30 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: The Informers (Paperback)
The Informers is a very interesting book. I'm not really sure how to say it outside of that. It doesn't leave a lasting impression as being good or bad, it just exists, interesting in it's own way. There isn't really a plot, it's rather a collection of stories about people who's lives are slightly connected through the people they know (along the line's of Altman's Shortcuts). Ellis' dialogue is fun as always and keeps the book relatively entertaining, but few events really stick in your head. He journey's through the lives of unhappy people in L.A., from rich college kids to unsatisfied housewives to rich homicidal vampires. Mostly he just gives you small glimpses into the lives of these people, their problems relating with each other, themselves, and the world at large. As always, they seem to be lost in an amoral wasteland with very few ambitions other than their shallow goals to look good and be envied. There are some truly frightening characters such as the vampire and his murder victims. Mostly it imparts a sense of having lost touch with reality, not being able to reach happiness because people are chasing things that are intangible. It's an astute observation of our society but it doesn't succeed as well as American Psycho did. All in all, not a bad book but very unfocused.
Also recommended: THE LOSERS' CLUB by Richard Perez
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3.0 out of 5 stars Ellis isn't the best short story writer., June 17 2003
This review is from: The Informers (Paperback)
This complilation has some good and some bad stories but unfortunately I can't really recommend this book and myabe it's because I am not a huge fan of short story complations. There are some characters that appear througout and some continuity but most of these stories are the same versions of each other in one form or another. Ellis' has that ability to replicate that sunshine maliase of Los Angeles known only to its inhabitants and this makes it interesting for So Cal readers like myself as is also the case with Less Than Zero. Ellis needs more than a few pages to set up his characters and that is part of the problem of Informers.
Bottom Line: fans of Ellis should check it out, curious readers should start at the beginnin with Less Than Zero. Reading Ellis' books in order is actually really important for two reasons. First, Less Than Zero is the easiest read of them all and it introduces you to his style in a gradual manner. Second, Ellis uses the amusing literary trick of characters popping up here and there in other novels and you will recognize the most of these by reading his books in chronilogical order.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A Writer depicting an Emotional Wasteland, Sept. 9 2002
By 
R. Morell "Frostwolf" (Albany, NY USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Informers (Paperback)
I think Bret Easton Ellis is getting at something that Americans don't really want to face--that in our emotional deadness and lack of concern for others we might as well be vampires. It was a brilliant turn to include a vampire as just another denizen of this soulless, wealthy L.A., the place where a lot of people want to be, and want to be seen. His vision is at turns horrifying and hilarious, but mostly what I feel is a deep, abiding sadness for the state of humanity in these twilight years of capitalism. (My favorite of his books is actually "The Rules of Attraction" which another reviewer mentioned and has been made into a film due for release in October, 2002.) Perhaps I overstate the case a bit, but what Chekhov did for the Russian aristocracy, Ellis is kindly doing for Los Angeles Decadents. I don't remember the titles of the stories, but the one I liked the best depicted a father taking his son to Hawaii for Christmas, and failing to make a connection. Also liked that the book opened with a quote from John Fante, THE L.A. novelist.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Well written, exhausting to read, Feb. 11 2002
By 
Alexander Zalben (Long Island City, NY United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Informers (Paperback)
Mr. Ellis' strength is in his realistic dialogue and characters, which is well on display here in this collection of character sketches.
I say character sketches, and not short stories, because that's really what they are. A series of interconnected portraits of the different, intermingling layers of society in LA.
And it is pretty impressive at that. Each of the characters in the book are going through very similar feelings, have very similar problems (spiraling depression, enstrangement from their parents, etc.). Luckily, Mr. Ellis is able to differentiate their characters and situations.
As happens with books of this type, the ending seems to rush together more quickly, and feel more connected than the beginning. And frankly, as much respect as I have for Mr. Ellis' writing, it was exhausting to read story after story. The book is an interesting portrait of a city constantly on the edge of destruction, but there's only so much nihilistic fiction a guy can read before you curl up into a ball in the corner.
As always, Ellis is a writer worth reading. But be prepared: it is a short book, but a long haul.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Short Stories...Some Good, Some Average...., July 1 2001
By 
Piers (Melbourne, Australia) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Informers (Paperback)
3 and 1/2 stars leaning towards 4.
Bret Easton Ellis applies his cold Californian brushstroke to another slice of L.A. life. He is still using the same kind of clipped, cold and quick-to-read writing, but the difference here is that is is applied to more marginal members of society (as opposed to highschoolers, uni students and yuppies) such as rock stars, modern-day vampires, murderous dealers as well as possibly more familiar family settings.
Some of these stories are pretty good (The Secrets of Summer, Letters from L.A. & Discovering Japan), others are more average (Water From The Sun), but really if you know Bret Easton Ellis, then you know what you're are getting (bored, cold and uncaring charcters in interesting surroundings), the main difference here is due to the lack of an overall story there is a wider range of terrain and a little less cohesion. If you dig the man, you'll probably dig this book, it's a pretty decent page turner, but not in the same league as "Less Than Zero" or "American Psycho".
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3.0 out of 5 stars a good collection from the Master of Cold..., Nov. 24 2000
This review is from: The Informers (Paperback)
"The Informers" is a collection of short stories that I've read one critic describe as 'soul-dead' among other things. Bret Easton Ellis is sort of like the David Cronenberg (or Lynch) of the literary world, in that fans will recognize and feel at home with the style, while others will most likely be left cold and angry.
This collection (which contains material that was started as early as 1983) possesses the same dense characters, subject matter, and dialogue that punctuated his previous novels. Things are horrific and chaotic, but buffered by moments of mocking humor. Stories like 'In the Islands' (which introduces us to "American Psycho" character Tim Price) and 'Letters from L.A.' (the best story in the collection) display Ellis's rarely-revealed knack for showing the feelings that make and manipulate people. 'The Secrets of Summer' and 'The Fifth Wheel' show off Ellis's lust for sadism (echoes of "American Psycho").
As as whole, "The Informers" is a mixed bag. It won't do anything to sway those who condemned AP, nor will it be anything new or special to fans. It's essentially channel-surfing as literature, and Ellis's run-on sentences help make things pass quickly enough.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Passionate slices of life from Ellis' moral wasteland, Oct. 6 2000
By 
Joshua David (Minneapolis, MN) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Informers (Paperback)
"The Informers" is not billed as a book of short stories though that is how Ellis has often described it. Ellis' stories consist of a desert car wreck, a violent rock star, an older woman who lusts for much younger men, a young man practicing a gothic vampire lifestyle and an innocent girl who is transformed by the allure and temptations of Los Angeles. Those are just a few of the stories; they're not connected literally but all definitely belong in the same book. Perhaps the simplest of all of Ellis' works, but also one of the strongest, and displays one of his central themes as well as any of his books: The use of sex and drugs by his ridiculously wealthy characters to make them feel something other than boredom, greed, and contempt. All of Ellis' characters feel like real people, as morally depraved as many of them (most of them) are. perhaps that is why he is so troubling to so many readers and critics. All in all, "The Informers" is vintage Bret Easton Ellis.
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The Informers
The Informers by Bret Easton Ellis (Paperback - Aug. 1 1995)
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