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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In a word, fun
I would still rate 'South of the Border, West of the Sun' more highly, but this is Murakami's most flat-out entertaining novel. Although it's billed as a sequel to Wild Sheep Chase, and it is about the same character, _all_ of Murakami's novels seem to be about the same basic everyman character, and reading Sheep Chase first isn't neccesary (I read this before I read...
Published on April 10 2004 by Henry Platte

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3.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable novel but...
Murakami has cashed in on the deserved success of A Wild SheepChase by writing what is superficially a sequel. He grabs a couple ofthe old characters, but quickly drops them. He introduces several new people, but he doesn't do much with them either. He's a writer desperately trying to clutch at wacky sub plots to bolster a weak central story. He alludes to everybody from...
Published on April 4 2000 by Amazon Customer


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars In a word, fun, April 10 2004
By 
This review is from: Dance Dance Dance (Paperback)
I would still rate 'South of the Border, West of the Sun' more highly, but this is Murakami's most flat-out entertaining novel. Although it's billed as a sequel to Wild Sheep Chase, and it is about the same character, _all_ of Murakami's novels seem to be about the same basic everyman character, and reading Sheep Chase first isn't neccesary (I read this before I read Sheep Chase). Still, Sheep Chase, as Murakami's first novel, provides a good point of reference.
The characters in Dance, Dance, Dance are almost exponentially more vibrant than those in Sheep Chase, from the bored, occasionally clairvoyant young girl who might have stepped out of a Salinger novel, to the plucky one-armed American poet. There's an almost cartoonish (not in at all a bad way) quality to these people; they stand out that much, and are that sharply drawn. The intriguing criticism of genius offered in Sheep Chase recurs, more subtly and kindly, in the form of a brilliant woman photographer who happens to be a very poor mother. Murakami is also unexpectedly kind to another character, the superificial actor Gotanda, who reveals a sharply human side. In the end, that may be exactly it about this novel; a sense of warmth and quiet joy underneath everything, even the more sinister events, which not many novels of this modernist type can muster. Every stroke of good fortune seems deserved, and every tragedy is lamented.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Never Fails to Captivate - Audio book review, May 3 2012
By 
Heather Pearson "Heather" (Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dance Dance Dance (Paperback)
Most of the time, when I start to read or to listen to a book, I have a number of expectation of what the story will be about and how it might proceed. I have learned not to do this with books by Haruki Murakami. I selected this book based on having enjoyed The Wind-up Bird Chronicles, and decided I would just go with the flow and let the story reveal itself to me as I listened.

That is exactly what happened. Murakami slowly peeled back the layers of the story exposing characters and twists that I couldn't have anticipated. The narrator is a 30 something freelance writer. We find that he is going through the motions of living life; he lives each day, but doesn't really experience any of it. Just a taste here and there just as with the restaurant reviews he write. He'll order a vast assortment of delectable dishes, but only take a bite from each. His job is very much like this as well. He is a free lance writer who accepts pretty well every job that comes his way. He allows the jobs to direct the course of his life. The experiences that he tastes are all the result of these random jobs.

A continuing series of dreams about a run down hotel he once stayed in draws him back to Sapporo to the Dolphin Hotel. The old dump has been replaced by a modern steel and glass construction, though the essence of the old hotel remains. It is here that the narrator connects with the sheep man, who becomes his guide in moving him along the path to really living, to learning how to dance.

He is further aided along his journey by an unusual assortment of companions. Thirteen your old Yuki has been abandoned in Sapporo by her photographer mother and needs and escort back to Tokyo. I've already mentioned the fast talking sheep man. The one armed poet in Hawaii stops our narrator and sets him to wondering how how much that has changed/affected the poet's life. Then there is Gotunda, a former classmate of his who keeps popping back into his life via the movies that he has acted in. I'm still wondering if the narrator has a man-crush on Gotunda.

Rupert Degas was the reader for this story. He does a wonderful job of portraying all the characters. I particularly liked his voicing of the sheep man with his almost none pause speaking. When he spoke for Yuki, I was convinced that I was hearing a thirteen year old girl. Unabridged 12 hours 45 minutes.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I wish I could read this for the first time again!, June 17 2004
By 
Sophie (astoria, ny) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Dance Dance Dance (Paperback)
I think the greatest complement a book can receive is that you actually miss reading it. Often we go to the movies, read a novel, and two months later you can barely remember seeing/reading it. I miss this book, perhaps more than other Murakami's work. If you haven't read anything by him yet, you must try it.
It's hard to describe the style of the book, but I think he has a pretty universal appeal. A little strange and familiar at the same time. Weird things happen, but he describes them in a lightly straight-forward way.
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5.0 out of 5 stars metaphysical triller by Japanese author gives chills, Feb. 12 2014
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From haunted hotels to disappearing call girls this book spans the dark spaces between reality and the spirit world of the Japanese culture.
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4.0 out of 5 stars probably the best. Loved his style, July 22 2014
The first Murakami book I read; probably the best. Loved his style, like a film noir, so cool and weird. Recommend this to everyone.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Another surreal twist in time, March 21 2004
By 
Jim Richards "mr_grumpy" (Sydney, Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Dance Dance Dance (Paperback)
This is a good book. Murakami's writing involves detailed characters who do not always know where they are going nor who they are. The characters and environment are detailed and exquisite, making one want to visit the places written about.
This book includes a sideline into a metaphyical world for the narrator, which helps to drive him and guide him. By the end of the book, typical understanding of all the events and characters may not be achieved but a sense of peace is created.
When you read this book, do not expect typical Western narrative structures, details or a sense of closure. As with other Murakami books consider the leaves, on the trees in the forest.
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4.0 out of 5 stars enjoyable surreal weirdness; amongst Murakami's best, Feb. 21 2004
By 
lazza (Fort Lauderdale, Florida) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Dance Dance Dance (Paperback)
Haruki Murakami mostly writes books that fall into two categories: either the 'confused but in love' bucket, or the 'confused young man finds himself totally weirded-out' bucket. The first category has Murakami classics such as 'Norwegian Wood' and 'South of the Border, West of Sun', and the latter has 'A Wild Sheep Chase' and 'The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle'. 'Dance, Dance, Dance', being a sequel to 'A Wild Sheep Chase', is about as weird as anything published by Murakami. And it is about as good, ... which is to say it is very good indeed.
It is very hard to explain the novel since the story is so .. strange, convoluted, surreal, etc. We have altered realities, a 13 year old spoilt girl with precognition powers, and a befuddled young Japanese man caught in the middle. It all works, sort of. Believable? Not even close.
Bottom line: a book best enjoyed by seasoned Murakami readers. Fans will love it.
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4.0 out of 5 stars So I can dance after all?, July 2 2003
By 
Kevin (Ann Arbor, Michigan United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Dance Dance Dance (Paperback)
Before I start actually reviewing this book, I should note that I haven't read any of Murakami's other books, so I can't comment on how this one compares. I was also unaware until just now that the book was a sequel to "A Wild Sheep Chase." I actually have a hunch that "Dance Dance Dance" works better without having read that book, but obviously I can't say for sure. At any rate, it stands on its own.
Despite containing many impossible things, "Dance Dance Dance" is a very realistic book. I say this because not everything that happens fits neatly into an overarching structure, and some events never end up making sense. Neither of those things are true of most novels, but they almost always apply to real life. The characters, weird as they are, almost all have authenticity. This is especially true of the nameless protagonist.
It's necessary to learn what to expect from this book. If you read it looking for a straight-up mystery that resolves itself in the traditional way, as is tempting, you will be disappointed. What you can expect is an entertaining, darkly surreal, and ultimately reassuring story which probably would have been classified as urban fantasy had it been written by an American or British author or magical realism had it been written by a Latin American. Seen that way, I really can't think of any particular flaws in it. The lack of a fifth star is due to the absence of superlative things, not the presence of bad ones.
The authors this book reminded me of most were Philip K. Dick and Neil Gaiman, though it doesn't resemble either so strongly.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A delicious read...as Yumiyoshi would say... "Fantastic!", May 22 2003
By 
Wil (Toronto, ON Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Dance Dance Dance (Paperback)
In Dance Dance Dance, we are drawn into Murakami's typical murky world where our nameless narrator from "A Wild Sheep Chase" continues to search for his place in a world of "advanced capitalism" - struggling to place meaning behind a world of false values/aspirations and pressures to conform.
Old friends such as Kiki, the Sheep Man, and his copywriting partner surface for a much welcomed appearance - while new warm and fuzzy characters are introduced in familiar places such as the Dolphin Hotel to further propel the plot.
Murakami succeeds in Dance because he forcefully reminds us of the true value of things in everyday life. He tactfully revisits old themes such as - not realizing the value of things until it's too late - the fragility of the human psyche - and the pain of losing loved ones. Further more, only Murakami can compare and contrast the value of Rolex watches, Maserati sports cars with the joys of preparing and savouring simple but rich, mouth watering homemade-meals.

After flipping through the last few pages of Dance, I am glad to say that it feels as though I have fallen in love for the first time all over again.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A more gentle Murakami, April 25 2003
By 
Barbara Klein (Basalt, Colorado USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Dance Dance Dance (Paperback)
If you have not read "The Wind Up Bird Chronicle," I strongly recommend it. It is Murakami's best and most complex novel dealing with the images and themes explored in "Dance, Dance, Dance." This is a sweeter story, a kind of love story, set in the strange landscape of Murakami's parallel universes. Although it is not quite as thought provoking as "Wind Up Bird," it is very engrossing and enjoyable.
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Dance Dance Dance
Dance Dance Dance by Haruki Murakami (Paperback - Jan. 31 1995)
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