Customer Reviews


868 Reviews
5 star:
 (506)
4 star:
 (183)
3 star:
 (74)
2 star:
 (47)
1 star:
 (58)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Small but powerful book
By now, there's little dispute about "Gatsby" being the classic that it is. And if you're not a fan, if nothing else, you didn't have to invest a great amount of time inthe book, for it is not long. But the character of Jay Gatsby is quite unique. Jay Gatsby loves without judgment, without conquest or need. The sad irony is that the object of such noble...
Published on March 28 2006 by Eric L. Neggilfan

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Wealthy
I had to read The Great Gatsby for my 11th grade English class. Now I have read the book four times, and I have yet to understand what makes this novel receive all the praise it does. The plot is like a Beverly Hills 90210 episode in the 1920s. The plot is that Gatsby loved a beautiful socialite Daisy way back when. Then Gatsby had to leave for the war, though Daisy...
Published on March 7 2004 by Carol Vassar


‹ Previous | 1 2 387 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

4.0 out of 5 stars Fitgerald's Great Gatsby, May 25 2004
By 
This review is from: The Great Gatsby (Paperback)
Rich man Jay Gatsby has everything he could possible want, money beyond imagination, a waterfront house on long island sound, and parties at his mansion day and night. The one thing his life is missing is the one thing that he desires most-Daisy Buchanan. Fitzgerald's Great Gatsby tells the story of greedy upper class people who have only desire to get more and further distance themselves from the lower class. Jay Gatsby throws all his extravigant parties but has only one goal in mind-attracting Daisy. Her husband Tom is already wrapped up in an affair with low-life Myrtle. The Rich folks' treatment of each other and disregard for others is at the center of Fitgerald's novel. Other themes to look for are his use of weather to set the mood of the scenes, use of colors(especially yellow and green) to foreshadow upcoming events, and the disparity between the upper and lower class. I recommend this book to all young and old, as it is a classic read that everyone should experience at one point in their life.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A Book to Span the Ages, May 17 2004
This review is from: The Great Gatsby (Paperback)
I am sorry to have waited so long to read this masterpiece. F. Scott Fitzgerald's crowning achievement is a relatively concise, easily readable gem of a story, which goes much deeper than the average genre fiction (obviously), but not in a dull way.
It is very easy to picture oneself as Nick, the protagonist, attempting to piece together this strange character, Jay Gatsby, and the elaborate world he inhabits. Character development is beautifully accomplished as the book progresses, and there is no wasted scenes or characters. In fact, there is a great deal of substance to the entire story, despite its focus on the lack of substance for the characters presented.
The Great Gatsby will help you understand the lives of the fabulously wealthy in the 20s, but more importantly it will help you begin to understand the real world, and what is really important. Gatsby's "Green light" is each of ours as well, if we would only see it.
If you have a soul, you will love this book, and either way, it will certainly make you think.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The quintessential novel, May 15 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: The Great Gatsby (Hardcover)
I believe novels should be accessible to people of all tastes, from those who prefer history and biography (as I do) to those who prefer science fiction. Truly great novels transcend personal preferences and that is exactly what the Great Gatsby is-- a story of human nature, set in a time of recklessness and ambition that seems to parallel, in some ways, our world today. It is written with soft prose and vivid imagery-- the examples are too numerous to be listed here. As most know the plot, I won't delve into that, but just to add that, considering this shouldn't be a spoiler, one question I have always wondered (and wished to the contrary) is, "Why did Gatsby have to die?" Despite his surely illictly-garnered fortune and reckless nature, the reader cheers for Gatsby, who is far from perfect, but represents a small part of each of us. That is truly the magic of Fitzgerald's piece and I hope, especially if you've never read it before, that you find a little enchantment yourself.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Among the top ten American Novels, May 2 2004
By 
Elizabeth (Metairie, LA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Great Gatsby (Paperback)
THE GREAT GATSBY is a beautiful classic that should be read over and over again. Fitzgerald's masterpiece shows the story of the lost American Dream. With much symbolism and beautiful words, this novel tells the story of a man named Jay Gatz who through illegal activity became rich so that he could win back his first love Daisy, who lives on East Egg with her husband Tom. Tom is abusive and cheats on Daisy with Myrtle, and Gatsby watches the green light on Daisy's porch with desire from his mansion on West Egg. Gatsby knows what love is and believes that the only reason she married Tom instead of him is because he did not get back from the war soon enough and Daisy liked Tom because he was rich. With some funny parts but also some very sad parts, this novel paints a beautiful picture of the American Dream that has been lost and torn apart. Although this was written during the twenties, its theme is applicable to our lives today. I highly recommend this book if you are in high school or older so that you can understand the full meaning of this book and see more than the plot because there is a lot of symbolism in this book that borrows from Shakespeare and the Bible. This edition of the book has notes in the back, notes on the text, and a history of the author. A masterpiece that should not be passed by!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars THE GREAT GATSBY IS A GREAT BOOK!!!!, April 29 2004
By 
This review is from: The Great Gatsby (Paperback)
The Great Gatsby, by F. Scott Fitzgerald is a great novel! I would first like to tell you that upon my first reading of the novel I was not impressed. My first reading of the novel was when I was a freshman in high school. I didn't enjoy reading nor did I appreciate writing at that time. My disliking of reading contributed and affected my views on the book drastically. I decided to give the book another try again seven years later and I love it! I think if the book is read by an experienced reader at any age, then one could appreciate the book for the many great aspects and details provided for the readers.
This novel brings to us many feelings. It demonstrates to us how greed, wealth, love, ambition, success, lover's triangles, and one's desire can change life. Once all those things are linked together the plot becomes very intense. I enjoyed that the novel included all of those life's happenings.
The plot to the novel is very exciting. It portrays the early 1900's and the Jazz Age beautifully. I enjoyed that the plot was directed towards what daily life could bring to one's self. The characters, plot, daily occurrences, opportunities, employment, and the struggles in the book were all a very good representation of early American life. I feel the book portrayed real life, real problems, and real people. While reading the book I never thought or found what I was reading to be far fetched.
I enjoyed that the book was told by a character that wasn't the main character. I enjoyed the perspective that it gave by looking into Gatsby's life and not Gatsby simply being informative about his life story. I also enjoyed that the main characters were not the only focus in the book! There were additional characters that were linked in many different ways to the main ones and were introduced and then continuously followed upon. The book became to be a story about many people and how life`s obstacles affected their decisions, choices, and life in general.
I think anyone who enjoys reading should read this novel at least once. The novel has a very nice story line that I think most everyone should enjoy it! I give this book 4 stars!!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars The Great Gatsby Review, April 27 2004
By 
Jess (Seymour, IN USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Great Gatsby (Paperback)
Before I read "The Great Gatsby", I had no prior knowledge of its content. It seemed from the people that I talked with were either fascinated or disappointed with its' story line. So my thoughts were mixed about the author and what he wrote, however, once I read the book I was quite pleased with the story and its' narrator, Nick Carraway, and the experiences he had with his neighbor, Jay Gatsby.
The book is essentially filled with love-hate relationships and suspenseful twists, which enlightened my curiosity page after page. It is no wonder that this book is being used in school curriculums as a required reading, for its material is interesting for many young minds because of its wide range of adventure, mystery, romance, and ambition within the book that kids can relate to in one aspect or another.
Furthermore, upon reading "The Great Gatsby" I would recommend anyone with virtually any reading level to jump at the opportunity to read it, for not only is F. Scott Fitzgerald one of our finest writers, his book "The Great Gatsby" is an American classic, and also the book may enhance your perspective of what New York and its people were like in the nineteen twenties.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars What's the big fuss?, April 22 2004
By 
Luis M. Luque "luquel" (Crofton, Maryland, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Great Gatsby (Hardcover)
This probably sounds like heresy given it's reputation, but I cannot, for the life of me, figure out why "The Great Gatsby" is universally considered one of the greatest novels written in the English language during the 20th Century. I've read it twice trying to figure it out; I'm still at a loss. Just not my cup of tea I guess. To me the story completely lacks drama. I'm not saying Fitzgerald can't write, I'm simply saying that the plot and characters are just plain boring. Stringing words together in a pleasing way is very different from telling an interesting story -- the main reason we read, of course. I feel completely uninvolved, distanced from time, setting, characters, conflict and plot. I couldn't care less what happens. And after two readings I barely remember any of it. I don't think it's that I'm not "smart enough" or "cultured enough" to get it, I can after all, appreciate the likes of Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Faulkner, etc. I'm not some philistine. I do hold advanced degrees and have read many other books of equally great reputation. Fitzgerald just doesn't make me care about these people for some reason.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic.. but what about the ending?, April 19 2004
By 
Claus Hetting (Gentofte, Copenhagen Denmark) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Great Gatsby (Paperback)
Scott Fitzgerald has been showered with praise and celebrated as one of the great authors of the century, and deservedly so. His language is remarkable because he uses quite an extensive vocabulary with the utmost precision, and is able to create vivid characters with a few succint phrases, a few strokes of the artist's brush. However, there are two things that strike me as odd in this novel: the "prologue", that is, the first few paragraphs, which must have been written after the rest of the novel had been completed. This is a strange and ambiguous opening, and I am not sure that it is very good. And secondly the ending itself, because closure is brought about by introducing an accident (Daisy running over Tom's mistress). Somehow this is not satisfactory, at least not to me, because it avoids a final confrontation between the characters. Here Fitzgerald may as well have sent down a bolt of lightning to kill someone! People's fates in literature should be decided by themselves or by some other character, not by something beyond anyone's control. Why? Because that negates that character is fate and action; in fact, EVERYTHING in a novel should stem from character.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Gatsby is Truly Great, April 18 2004
By 
Andrew Desmond (Neutral Bay, NSW Australia) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Great Gatsby (Hardcover)
What a joy it has been to return to a book such as "The Great Gatsby" after an absence of thirty years. I last read this book as a teenager and, although I enjoyed it then, it is a real delight to an adult.
In essence, the book outlines the life and lifestyle of Jay Gatsby who lived on Long Island near New York City in the 1920s. His background is shrouded in some mystery with various reports that he has been a killer, a bootlegger and a fixer of baseball's 1919 World Series. However, the key to his background is unrequited love for Daisy Buchanan who he knew at the time of the First World War and before he was sent away to France. Unfortunately, during his wartime absence, Daisy has married someone else and Gatsby is left yearning for her company. He throws vast and extravagant parties in the hope that Daisy might drop by and their love can be rekindled. His love rules his life as, across the water from his house, he can see the distant green light at the end of the pier at Daisy's home. This distant light epitomises his love for Daisy; it is far away yet still burning.
Without wrecking the plot for those readers who may not be so familiar with the book, Gatsby's life ends with pain and misery and no renewal of love. In this sense, the book takes on the character of a Shakespearean tragedy.
I can recommend this book to all readers of great fiction. "The Great Gatsby" has a timeless quality. It has endured for decades so far and will endure for many more to come.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Novel Is Great In Spite of the Hype, April 13 2004
By 
M. JEFFREY MCMAHON "herculodge" (Torrance, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Great Gatsby (Paperback)
Some works of art are so engrained in our popular consciousness that it's almost impossible to judge them without the interference of all our collective baggage we bring as we approach them. Gatsby is a classic example. Having read the novel ten times over the last twenty years, I have enjoyed a certain distance and just as importantly the opportunity to compare different impressions at different stages of my life. The result is that I am even more impressed with the novel than all the annoying hype and commotion that continues to follow the novel would allow me to have. Without boring you about all the themes that have been hashed over and over, I would like to point out that there is a great question the novel asks us: Why does the narrator Nick have sympathy for Gatsby while loathing all the other chasers of the American Dream? It seems that Gatsby is a contradictory fellow, part ruthless dreamer zealously selling his soul to afford himself the trappings of fame, popularity, and glory. However, Gatsby, unlike the other ambitious characters in this novel, has a certain innocence and vulnerbility. Also, he is a true believer in his own delusion that if he can live a life a wealth and afford parties, he will overcome his childhood limitations and win the love of others. It's his craving of others' love that makes him sympathetic. In a way, he's a spiritual cousin of Citizen Kane who, for all his gaudy possessions, simply wanted the unconditional love represented by "Rosebud" on his sled, the embodiment of childhood belonging. Nick the narrator has the sensitivity to see this wounded child in Gatsby and reserves judgment against him.
Gatsby's pathological hunger for attention and popularity reminds me of all the people who go on Reality TV shows, hoping to promote themselves and be seen by all, grabbing their fifteen minutes of fame even as they debase themselves in various types of tomfoolery that showcase America's blind ambition and back-stabbing competition. Many years earlier, Fitzgerald saw how dangerous it was to blindly embrace American images of success without self-knowledge and without a moral code to keep us sane and he wrote about this theme so elegantly in Gatsby, a masterpiece that transcends all our limiting preconceptions we bring to it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 387 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Great Gatsby
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (Paperback - June 1 1995)
Used & New from: CDN$ 0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews