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103 Reviews
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very poor and very happy
A wonderful read and very easy to get caught up in! An older Hemingway looking back on the time when he was "twenty-five and living in Paris", really the period from 1921 to 1926. Paris, the moveable feast that one takes with you for the rest of your life.

The book is structured in a series of vignettes and it's like leafing through Hemingway's personal photo...
Published 14 months ago by Daffy Bibliophile

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Happiness ending in regret
I appreciated this memoir of Ernest Hemingway and his first wife, Hadley and their son Bumby, as they experienced Paris (and the occasional excursion to Austria and Spain) in the late 20s. In typical Hemingway fashion, he can make you feel as though you are right there in Paris, seeing what he saw, all the while describing it with sparse and plain prose.

There...
Published on Aug. 12 2010 by D Glover


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5.0 out of 5 stars Sad and inspiring, May 6 2004
By 
This review is from: A Moveable Feast (Paperback)
I used this book for my English practice to prepare to the GMAT and get better at writing essays. I know it is bizarre, but it is a gerat book for international students looking for style. Not a hard one, and a pleasant read. Especially good for RC and SC. Hemingway has good grammar.
I borrowed one from a friend and i really wish I owned a copy... I even wanted to buy it right now from Amazon for $0.85. I love the many moments of Hemingway's student life in Paris. His encounters with many prominent writers, and struggles to have meals regularly. Eventually, as he got broke, he was forced to go to Austria to a ski resourt... I guess that's exactly what I will do when I run out of my loan money. By the way, when you get to the Bschool, make sure to get as much money as you can...it is easier to return than to get.
Great for pensive melancholy evenings after a ding letter ;)
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3.0 out of 5 stars alright..., Jan. 29 2004
This review is from: A Moveable Feast (Paperback)
well as a Hemingway fan,this was one of the reasons why I choose to read it. I enjoy Hemingway's attention to detail which is why I love reading his works, but I must confess I did not see what all the hype was about this book. I was quite frankly bored with it. I finished it, but if you want know Hemingway read any other of his novels and then read this one.
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5.0 out of 5 stars One of Hemingway's Best, Jan. 14 2004
By 
James Sadler (Plano, TX United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Moveable Feast (Hardcover)
This is my 100th review and when I realized I was approaching number 100, I puzzled over what book to make my list as my 100th review. Hemingway immediately came to mind, but then the question was, which one? I finally decided on this, which may well be my favorite Hemingway work.
Even though it was published posthumously, this book does not reek of other hands having been all over it as have some other posthumous Hemingway publications. It has been questioned as to how much of this book is fact and how much fiction. Even Hemingway raised the issue at the beginning of the book. It doesn't really matter. In this book Hemingway is recollecting events that occurred over roughly a five year period which were over thirty years past when he started on the book. So, no doubt of it may well be fiction, given the passage of time.
But the book is monumental in that it is perhaps the quietest and most elegant of Hemingway's books. It is broken into chapters that recount various episodes in his life during that period he dwelled largely in Paris. It is sometimes funny, occasionally sad, but always intriguing. As I write this, I'm slowly convincing myself that it is my favorite work by him.
We are introduced to Hemingway's circle of friends and acquaintances from that period: Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound, James Joyce, Ford Madox Ford, and the always interesting F. Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald. It's amazing how many other literary figures Hemingway came in contact with during his life and he gives interesting tales of all of them.
Even if you normally dislike Hemingway, I truly believe you will love reading this memoir. A true literary triumph and recounting of a time like none we will ever see again.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Poetry in Prose, Sept. 30 2003
By 
Nicole "rockinrenee" (Steubenville, Ohio United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: A Moveable Feast (Paperback)
This was the second book I read by Ernest Hemingway, but it was the book that I most wanted to read. I have always heard how beautiful this novel was, and it was underestimated. This novel is like poetry in prose. The descriptions of Paris are enough to make anyone romaticize about this city and his descriptions of his friends, family, and colleagues will make them seem almost more than human. There is a mixture of happiness, that he obviously felt during these years, and of melancoly of a man remembering a better time in his life. His love for his first wife is so obvious here that it seems so sad when, in the end, it fails. But most of all I loved the idea that Paris was a moveable feast, meaning that no matter where he goes in life he can take the experiences, feelings, and innocence of this time in his life with him to keep him warm. No matter how cold and rainy the winter may be, there will always be a spring.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Celebrity, Sept. 4 2003
By 
Warren Fish (Oregon, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Moveable Feast (Paperback)
A great book for die-hard fans of Hemmingway, A Moveable Feast will disappoint many readers. For the average person, it would make more sense to read his famous novels first. While it is interesting to know what Paris was like between the Wars, and to read about some of the other famous people Hemmingway knew (Fitzgerald, Stein, Joyce, Elliot, Pound), it's not half as engaging as great novels like The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, For Whom the Bell Tolls, or The Old Man and the Sea. So check those out first. And if you already have and are getting into the rest of his stuff, good for you, but I bet there is plenty of other "rest of" to get to ahead of this. Of course, if you are really into Paris, writers from the turn of the century, and/or dirty laundry, then feast away.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful description of Fitzgeralds, June 15 2003
By 
Jennifer B. Barton "Beth Barton" (McKinney, Tx) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Moveable Feast (Paperback)
Honestly, I am recommending this book solely on the last three or four chapters where he talks about the Fitzgeralds. In those pages, Scott Fitzgerald comes to life and is held immortal in its print. The rest of the book is interesting and held my attention even though I don't know who everyone is that he talks about. I recognize their names though - Gertrude Stein, Ezra Pound - and believe those parts would have been a lot more enjoyable if I had already read their work. One thing at a time ... I'll get to them eventually. It would also help to be familiar with the layout of Paris for he describes his the routes of his walks in detail.
It strikes me, though I am not a writer, that this book should be read by anyone who aims to write. He describes the "writing process" and talks about what worked for him and what didn't. More importantly, he talked about being hungry as a new writer ... words of encouragement no doubt when those to follow his footsteps and wonder if hunger is the precursor to failure.
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5.0 out of 5 stars ...beauty is truth, truth beauty., May 10 2003
By 
D. Austin "Stutty" (Germany) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Moveable Feast (Hardcover)
I like a good story as much as the next guy. But this is not a good story.
This is a compilation of encounters between Hemmingway and various well known figures in Paris during the 1920's and his reflections of his own life and those of others. Although the author states that it may be considered a work of fiction, it has the feel of an autobiography, sort of.
No, it is not a good story. As a story goes, it is quite dull. The plot is non-existent and a seemingly enless train of mostly unrelated mundane anecdotes populate the slim novel. A day at the races, the fishermen on the Sein, a full description of every meal eaten in a scene (as well as the extensive list of alcohol imbibed) do not make for riveting fiction. It is brilliant.
Here is a work that is almost all style and no substance. This is art at its most sublime level. What Hemmingway did put in this novel was Truth. Truth with a capital T because I am not referring to the synonym of factual but instead the conveyence of reality. The rythym of the words set the pace of the city. The descriptions of things and places are brought to life with hypnotic clarity and with such consumate skill with words that it is difficult to put the novel down; not because you simply must know what will happen to the hero next, but because it seems a jolt to your own reality to be suddenly extricated from Paris. And yet, the simplistic sparse Hemmingway prose which brings these images to life, seem now as transparent as air. No flowery phrases, no poetry, just Truth.
For anyone who is curious what Hemmingway thought about Ezra Pound or Gertrude Stein, for anyone who is curious what F. Scott Fitzgerald was like, and wonder about Hemmingway's opinion of him as a person and a writer, this should be the next book on your list.
This is truly a work of literature.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Read for Hemingway, not for Paris, May 9 2003
By 
M. K. Krum "Consumer with attitude" (The Great State of Texas) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Moveable Feast (Hardcover)
In preparation for an upcoming vacation to Paris, I thought I'd give "fine literature" a try. I have to admit I'm no fan of Hemingway. I just thought it would be great to see the City of Lights through a writer's eyes. My mistake was choosing an writer I don't really enjoy. Hemingway depresses me and this memoir was no different.
Bottom line: If you are a Hemingway fan, you'll love his take on the city. If you are looking for a book set in Paris and aren't already a Hemingway fan, this may not be the book for you.
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5.0 out of 5 stars This is actually my favorite Hemingway book, May 2 2003
By 
Peggy Vincent "author and reader" (Oakland, CA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Moveable Feast (Paperback)
Written in a welcoming and engaging style, A Moveable Feast reads as if Hemingway wasn't trying to be HEMINGWAY. It's light and funny, a little rambling in spots, which he never was in his 'literature,' and simply delightful. It focuses on that golden era in Paris when starving young artists didn't really have to starve as they gathered in the cafes and discussed life and art and literature and politics.
Peopled with memorable and well-known (try Gertrude Stein and Picasso) characters, Moveable Feast is a delight for modern readers.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Hemingway's truth in 200 pages, April 30 2003
By 
Michael Mott (Buffalo) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: A Moveable Feast (Paperback)
A moveable feast is honest and warm. The tales of a lost generation in Paris. To hear Hemmingway speak of Joyce, Pound, Fitzgerald etc. is almost seeing them there yourself. Living modestly him and his wife in a flat in Paris still have time for the joyous things. He recalls his tribulations as a journalist and a struggling story writer. I'm also delighted by the passage in which Aleister Crowley is walking the streets and is then referred to as "The wickedest man in the world", the entire book is charming.
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A Moveable Feast
A Moveable Feast by Ernest Hemingway (Paperback - May 29 1996)
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