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Showing 1-6 of 6 reviews(2 star)show all reviews
on August 7, 2000
Ok, I guess everyone fell asleep in marketing 101. Because I'm amazed at how many people are overjoyed with the obvious concepts this book touts.
First off, this book is boring to the core. The writing style is slow, repetitive, and did I mention...repetitive ? He says the same thing (nothing) over and over again. This book should've been condensed to about 50 pages, which is all it needed.
The concepts he touts are all quite obvious, which leads me to believe marketing as a whole has shifted to a sad state of affairs if they need this book to point out the obvious to them. C'mon people, of course we don't want to get spammed and we would like more control over how marketing is pitched at us. This wins the "DUH!" award.
It's interesting to me that all these marketers are swearing this is the new Holy Bible of the Church of Marketing, yet I doubt more than 10% of those readers have put any of Mr. Godin's observations into practical use. God knows, everywhere I go, I have to OPT OUT of marketing campaigns instead of OPTING IN.
Just look at the recent flap over online retailers sending data to third parties (and you know who you are). It's obvious marketers want to say they are concerned with the customer, and spout out chapters of this book during meetings, but I'll be amazed if they ever do anything about it.
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on June 6, 2003
While Godin astutely details the need to build relationships with customers, that's been amply covered by other authors. My main beefs with this book are its dismissal of all forms of "traditional advertising" and its specious claim that offering prospects incentives is revolutionary. Wasn't John Caples offering how-to booklets to ad respondents sixty years ago?
However, Godin frames these tried-and-true techniques within the context of the Information Age, offering helpful examples of relationship marketing using e-mail, the Net, databases and the like. That may be particularly useful to business-to-business marketers. But anyone marketing to consumers should beware...brand story, great copywriting and broad visibility do matter still.
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on March 24, 2000
If the author would have limited himself to a 2 page article in a magazine, his basic idea of buying permission and upgrading it to increase consumer loyalty would have been fine. But since he chose to write an entire book and keeps repeating himself over and over again it is an insult for any half witted marketeer.
The book is also extremely US foucsed since no other country gets anywhere near the reach via internet that America can achieve. While it will improve in the future, any internet activity can currently only be one part of an overall marketing approach and it seems that the author does not understand 'traditional marketing' at all.
In summary, a nice basic idea but not worth a book!
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on July 6, 2001
He admits, and so his whole theory seems a bit b.s. after he's just said that in today's market you cannot use interruption marketing. A little too high on his own thing, sounds like Tom Vu or a religious evangelist, and you read the whole book, and youve paid your 9.99 and you still don't get the secret. Don't waste your money, there is nothing here that is useful that isn't intuitive.
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on July 6, 2000
Nothing new here. Just lots of old ideas in new Internet wrapping. Will interactive marketing, as it's more often known, eventually replace media advertising? No. Not even close. At least, not for most businesses trying to build a consumer brand presence--nor even for many B2B marketers. Still, this book isn't all bad...just be careful not to mistake it for anything new.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on August 29, 2003
While Godin does a good job retelling an old story about properly targeting, utilizing appropriate messaging and benefiting from modern (post-internet) media, it is not new. Some of his retelling is convoluted in endless metaphores. And, as this book was written before 9/11 and the dot-bomb, much of it is out-of-date and of reduced relevance.
There are more helpful and current books out there about internet and other direct-marketing topics.
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