Auto boutiques-francophones Simple and secure cloud storage Personal Care Furniture All-New Kindle Paperwhite Music Deals Store NFL Tools

Customer Reviews

68
4.0 out of 5 stars
Raving Fans: A Revolutionary Approach to Customer Service
Format: HardcoverChange
Price:$21.37+Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

on July 27, 2015
very pleased, will deal again!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on October 7, 2014
This was a present.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on January 17, 2014
This book is an easy read with numerous examples of success in business where simple, inexpensive changes have made a considerable difference. It has been used by my employer, a major international retailer, in its training of staff about effective customer service.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 11, 2004
Way too fluffy. It should have been presented as a bulleted list, not a book. If you must get this book, I recommend the print version; Charlie's voice is quite annoying.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on July 2, 2004
The intellectual content of this little book could fit nicely and succinctly in a 500-1000 word magazine or journal venue. Instead, Blanchard sticks to the successful story telling formula that served him well in The One Minute Manager. The concepts are good, and I think their true value lies in their simplicity. They are easily understood and therefore should be easy to apply. Successful implementation may be another matter. If you agree with the concepts, and it's hard to see how you wouldn't, the actual book is a great tool to get them out to your people. The long narrative has the effect of beating the points into your head and the examples leave little to the imagination as to how the concepts can be fleshed out. I have found that people who last raved about Who Moved My Cheese also rave about this book. Those who don't care for this type of cutesy, least common denominator writing style will try to get through it as fast as possible and glean the concepts for further consideration afterwards. It can be read cover to cover in about an hour and a half at a pretty leisurely pace. Regardless of whether or not you like the style of the book I think you will find the concepts and down to earth examples good food for thought in your own enterprise.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on June 17, 2004
I really enjoyed reading this book. It is an easy read and contains some great fundamentals on providing excellent customer service. Readers who enjoy this book may also enjoy reading Time Management is an Oxymoron.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 28, 2004
This book is a great read and a resonable explantion of the importance of customer service in any business. It is especially great if you are new to the world of work and/or customer service. Young students can gain a great deal from this book, from how to treat customers, find customers, knowing what drives customers, to how employees should be treated by a supervisor and the company that employs them. In response to Mike from Utah...exactly who do you think works in the customer service industry? The vast majority of American service providers are minimum wage earners, and, yes, some like their jobs. Employers have to keep them motivated somehow. This book not only provides a peek at how to do that, but, in typical Blanchard style, is a lighthearted, easy to understand read. The book says nothing about "automation employees". Quite the opposite...giving your employees the authority to make the decisions necessary to help a customer frees them from that automation. If you learn anything from reading this book...it is just that.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
In RAVING FANS, authors Ken Blanchard and Sheldon Knowles
concentrated on the importance of delighting customers . . . in GUNG
HO!, they focused on how companies could become the "employer of
choice" and attract the best employees . . . I liked both those
books and thus looked forward to listening to the taped version of
BIG BUCKS! . . . this third book promised me in its subtitle "How
to Make Serious Money for Both You and Your Company," something
that could be done by focusing my time and energy.
Like other works by Blanchard and Knowles, the points are
presented in a parable . . . here, we're introduced to a man struggling
to make ends meet . . . he goes on a journey to discover the secret
to becoming rich and meets three wise (and successful) people
who present simple truths that can be applied to virtually any
situation.
I liked the above fact; i.e., that when listening, I found myself
thinking that this stuff makes sense--and I should and could
apply it to my situation . . . there's nothing overly earth-shattering,
yet I should add that it got me thinking . . . and it made sense.
Also making sense was the conclusion, in which the authors
reviewed the simple tests that should have been learned from
either reading or listening:
The test of joy . . . you can't make money unless you're having fun.
The test of purpose . . .you can't make money unless making money
is more important than having fun.
The test of creativity . . . incomes, less expenses = profit.
And, lastly, there's perpetual prosperity . . . which comes to those
who help others.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on May 13, 2004
Mike from Utah, there is a thing called credibility. I haven't even read this book, yet I noticed your words "You will LOOSE an IQ point..." I have a hard time taking anything to heart from someone who cannot avoid a simple grammatical error. Then again, maybe you did "lose" an IQ point reading the book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on April 20, 2004
I read this book at the request of our manager and I feel as if I have been intellectually molested. Regurgitating trite catch phrases against the backdrop of every managers wetdream of mindlessly devoted automaton employees who seem content with their minimum wage jobs is not the best way to further motivate your own employees. The only thing that I learned from this senseless slaying of trees is that if an old man named Charlie, claiming to be my fairy godmother invites me into his car and tells me to close my eyes and not open them untill he says so, I should turn and run in the opposite direction.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed

One Minute Manager
One Minute Manager by Ken Blanchard (Hardcover - Jan. 1 1982)
CDN$ 21.37