Customer Reviews


10 Reviews
5 star:
 (5)
4 star:
 (4)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:
 (1)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Start, Conclusion Comes Up a Little Short
Riennart and Rogoff list all sorts of financial data. They attempt to identify various financial upheavals, that have occurred throughout the ages. There is information on; banking crises, inflation , deflation , currency crashes, asset prices, and countries defaulting on their debts.
Riennart and Rogoff then list a number of reoccurring themes, that are common to...
Published on June 3 2010 by Patrick Sullivan

versus
2.0 out of 5 stars Too technical to be entertaining.
The over technicality of the book was overly numbing. This made it a very extremely dull book. I recommend purchasing other business book regarding financial crises.
Published 22 months ago by Da Man


Most Helpful First | Newest First

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great Start, Conclusion Comes Up a Little Short, June 3 2010
By 
Patrick Sullivan (Kingston, Ont. Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Riennart and Rogoff list all sorts of financial data. They attempt to identify various financial upheavals, that have occurred throughout the ages. There is information on; banking crises, inflation , deflation , currency crashes, asset prices, and countries defaulting on their debts.
Riennart and Rogoff then list a number of reoccurring themes, that are common to most banking and debt collapse episodes.
After the reader has digested all the historical data. There is quite an anticipation on the analysis on the current Subprime Crisis. I would have liked a detailed breakdown of the US debt levels. There are all sorts of implied government debts such as Social Security, that are not officially listed as a liability. There are also high levels of personal debt such as; credit card debts, student loans, mortgages, and pay day loans, that should have been examined in detail. It would seem the US economy is in a far deeper debt situation, then anything we have seen before. Instead, Reinnart and Rogoff simply refer to US government accounting practices as "opaque".

Reinnart and Rogoff also concluded that a new independent international regulator, would help prevent future banking problems. Personally I laughed at that conclusion, but I am sure some people would agree with the idea.
This book is worth reading. However, the discussion on the current Suprime Crisis should have been more comprehensive.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


23 of 24 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Same old - same old, Jan. 17 2010
The book "This time is different" is well-researched, so well that it could be viewed as a scholarly entertaining, educational textbook. It is not easily read cover-to-cover in one or even a few sittings. Indeed, it is very demanding on the reader.

The book identifies excessive use of debt as the root cause of some of the most severe economic and financial ills of governments, societies and the business-world over many centuries. Lack of spending discipline, caused by ignorance, greed, lack of foresight, massive governmental intervention and/or acts of Dutch courage, is the driver of excesssive indebtedness. On the flip side of borrowers' inability to repay debt in full and on time is the damage visited upon lenders from the fall-out of insolvency. It could be argued that some or most of the causes of the excessive use of debt are, mutatis mutandis, identical with or similar to the causes of excessive lending. In other words, lack of due diligence is leading both borrowers and lenders into financial quagmires.

There is nothing inherently wrong with the use of debt; however, wrong is excessive use of debt.

The book's title is probably chosen to be facetious. It could, perhaps equally well, have read "same old - same old" and it would have hit the nail on the head, and, as such, would have reaffirmed Ecclesiastes 1:2-11: there is nothing new under the sun.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This Economic History Book is Different From All the Others, April 18 2013
Upon receiving the book it was really one so very very different to all the other histories of economic crisis that have been printed that my dismay and shock turned to pleasant surprise. Conditioned to the usual academic rigor of verbose and irrelevant commentary based on borrowed personal commentary from key individuals living during the crisis being reviewed, this book allowed for an easy read supported by solid economic time series presented in a graphical format.

The style is frankly one that takes all the modern tools in the computer age and consolidates the economic information into a useful concordance for the economic historian. The bibliography and references made available are outstanding. The use of graphics and description of relevant time lines for critical events raises the bar for future authors. What is contained between the cover pages is a nicely summarized database that is a useful desk reference for the trader or economic historian.

Most appreciated however is the lack of verbose commentary and personal reflections of personalities who were living through the crises events analyzed. The tone used to describe the events is not the usual PhD scribed analysis or over described rhetoric using obscure economic terms common to other volumes on economic panics. The length of the book also allows for more nights of leisure than the traditional economic history that needs several months or years to get through.

As others have said economic history is not the same read as say Shades of Gray or the latest Stephen King novel of popularized fiction. But this book is by far more readable and allows the reader the opportunity to make their own conclusions of the events and analytical areas under review based on the consolidated economic information presented. For students of economic history it provides a useful reference with comprehensive economic data not easily obtained anywhere else within one volume.

In short a good read and despite recent revelations of errors in the authors other writings, the conclusions and commentary provided in this book are solid and based on well researched economic data that allows the reader to independently arrive at their own conclusions about the theories being proposed by the authors.

A must have for the library of the economic historian.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding Overview of Financial Crises, April 5 2013
By 
Ian Robertson (West Vancouver, Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly (Paperback)
This book is different; already an important and oft-cited contribution to our understanding of financial crises, it will likely endure as both a turning point and a benchmark for economists and policymakers alike. Reinhart and Rogoff compile and synthesize centuries of economic data, draw both facts and inferences, and offer some predictions as to how the global financial crisis that began in 2006 with the US housing collapse might continue to unfold. A truly remarkable and important work. It requires some effort to read, but at the authors’ suggestion readers can skim or skip some of the more technical parts with no loss of continuity. In fact, those with an interest in only the recent financial crisis can read just the final chapters (13-17) and be well rewarded for their time.

Because it is primary research and because of its analytical rigour, this is first and foremost an academic text. Unlike most academic works, though, it is bereft of formulas and statistical analyses, instead relying on readers’ familiarity with a bit of (economic) history and geography. This is the first work to compile such an extensive set of economic data (sixty six countries over almost eight centuries), and differs substantially from earlier academics’ work such as Charles Kindleberger’s Manias, Panics and Crashes: A History of Financial Crises, Sixth Edition, which had previously stood as the best chronicle (i.e. not ‘analysis’) of financial folly. In Reinhart and Rogoff’s book, successive sets of historical data are explained and inferences or lessons drawn. As the lessons progress, we see that indeed it never is different; financial folly has endured for centuries and the card houses have fallen each time.

The authors identify four types of crises: sovereign defaults (domestic and international), banking crises, exchange rate crises, and very high inflation (above 20% annually). Each is explained in detail in different sections or chapters, with additional chapters focussing specifically on the recent sub-prime mortgage meltdown and some prescriptions for today’s policy makers.

With respect to recent policies, Reinhart and Rogoff note that financial sector deregulation results in increased risk taking, and state that “financial innovation is a variant of the liberalization process.” Banks’ self-congratulatory statements about the societal benefit of decades of new financial products suddenly appear in a different light; not just risk management tools (and profitable products for banks), but rather contributors to increased systemic risk. Turning their attention to the inevitable systemic collapse and resultant ballooning government debt levels, the authors note “on average government debt rises by 86% during the three years following a banking crisis.” While the debt levels may be alarming, it appears they are the inevitable short run consequence of a debt bubble.

So it’s not different this time after all: financial bubble, ballooning government debt, and then ... inflation? For those who worry about a recurrence of inflation, the authors illustrate the remarkable similarity over the centuries (even millennia) of currency debasement (the dilution of precious metal content or size of coins) and the modern era’s periodic high inflation. In their words “inflation and default are nothing new; only the tools have changed.” The chart accompanying this section showing 500 years of annual inflation rates is truly astounding, and shows one consistent pattern to the early 1900s, and a quite different one from then on. What changed a century ago to cause this shift; the advent in the US and elsewhere of central banking, the rapid development of our modern fractional reserve banking system, or perhaps the increase leverage?

A remarkable and thought provoking book providing a sweeping historical overview, thoughtful analysis, and relevant commentary on our current economic and financial situation.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A real eye opener - a tough read, but tons of data, Dec 28 2011
By 
R. Zlamal "Modsavant" (Ottawa, ON, Canada) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly (Paperback)
Quick summary - this is NOT a light-reading book. This is doctorate-level, textbook-caliber information that requires a certain amount of passion for the subject, otherwise it is easy to lose focus.

This book clearly had many hours of sweat-labor put into it. The sheer amount of data collected, analyzed and conclusions derived from it is astounding. I commend the authors for committing to such a huge project, and am fully impressed with the results. I don't think I found one spelling, grammar, or other layout error in this book. The overall layout and flow of information was logically presented.

The first 50-60 pages were difficult to read - lots of assumptions and explanations as to how the data was collected, analyzed and presented. Structurally, this is understandable and accepted, but for those that want to "get to the meat" of this book, you can probably just skim this section.

From there on, it was simply brilliant. I will not spoil it for you, but I can assure you that my eyes were opened by the time I finished reading it. I look at the banking and finance industries in a very different view now. A difficult, but almost necessary read for those interested in banking/financial crises of our past.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars The Long View, March 6 2013
This review is from: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly (Paperback)
Based on the empirical evidence, I have retained two lessons from this masterpiece:

1. Sovereign default is absolutely possible, indeed probable. Greece and Iceland type failures happen regularly, at least every 50 to 100 years. A US default is extremely unlikely but not impossible.

2. The recovery from a 2008 style financial crisis does not evolve quickly. The healing process takes time, many years. If you think that the DJIA making a new high in 2013 means that all is well, then you are assuming that "This Time is Different". Disregard the talking heads and assume that we need a decade for the private households/businesses to deleverage. The government fiscal and monetary correction will take even longer.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars Too technical to be entertaining., Feb. 6 2013
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly (Paperback)
The over technicality of the book was overly numbing. This made it a very extremely dull book. I recommend purchasing other business book regarding financial crises.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars great book, Jan. 21 2012
This review is from: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly (Paperback)
but depressing at the same time, how politicians and decision makers don't really understand money. great book for us common folks to manage our financial affairs differently so we don't work for the man our whole lives.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars it is different !, Jan. 20 2012
This review is from: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly (Paperback)
Once you have read this book you no longer have to purchase the many other financial titles out there. 90 % are quoted from in here. This is the most complete read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars It is work but worthwhile work., Dec 28 2011
This review is from: This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly (Paperback)
I checked the book out from the library and started reading it. I am pretty quick when I read but I have no formal economics background. I found myself wanting to understand what I was reading completely so I was going fairly slowly. I only made it through a couple of chapters before the book had to go back and I could not renew it. So I bought a copy to consume at my leisure. It seems that it should be required reading for all capitalists. As something of a capitalist but definitely of the 99%, this nicely sums up what is broken with the capitalist way of doing things. If we fix this then capitalism is no longer the best of a bad lot. It becomes pretty good.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly
This Time Is Different: Eight Centuries of Financial Folly by Kenneth Rogoff (Paperback - Aug. 7 2011)
CDN$ 22.77 CDN$ 15.12
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews