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5.0 out of 5 stars Hello, are you reading this!
Markets are converstions. When markets were created, the term market was a place where we came together to exchange goods and services, along with the stories of the grand ventures. Market was a place, not a verb. In the market people exchanged stories with their goods.
The industrial complex built up. Things became automated. Supply and demand seperated.
The...
Published on Oct. 27 2003 by A. M Wall

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3.0 out of 5 stars The end of business as usual
Hard to recommend such a small publication when the entire thing is now available for download at the website.
Markets are conversations. This is good.
Mass marketing is not a conversation. That is bad.
The authors leave themselves open to some fair criticism - their ideas aren't fully developed nor are their any clear suggestions as to implementation. It...
Published on Jan. 23 2004 by mbowman2


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3.0 out of 5 stars The end of business as usual, Jan. 23 2004
This review is from: The Cluetrain Manifesto (Paperback)
Hard to recommend such a small publication when the entire thing is now available for download at the website.
Markets are conversations. This is good.
Mass marketing is not a conversation. That is bad.
The authors leave themselves open to some fair criticism - their ideas aren't fully developed nor are their any clear suggestions as to implementation. It reads more as a protestation against existing norms than a viable alternative.
Find a second-hand copy. It's worth a read but not quite worth the price.
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2.0 out of 5 stars If you've been asleep for the last four years, read this, Dec 22 2003
This review is from: The Cluetrain Manifesto (Paperback)
I think the target audience is somebody who completely missed out on the late nineties, but who would like a very light read to understand the change in openness and freedom in conversations that most folks now take for granted. There's not a lot of content here -- you can skim about 10% of the book and get seemingly 99% of the content. If you're really "clueless", hit the web version instead and save the effort of grabbing this book.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Not bad, but lots missing..., Dec 1 2003
By 
adam872 (Houston, TX USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Cluetrain Manifesto (Paperback)
I have mixed feelings about this book. At the beginning, it makes a lot of sense, with discussions about markets and the power of the Internet. Here it succeeds. The problem is that it runs out of steam. A lot of concepts are repeated over and over and some of them make less sense the more they are repeated. There are some good ideas about using the technology to reconnect with customers, co-workers and the world at large. The case histories are also quite illuminating. These guys have clearly been there and done it. The problem I have is that they think the Internet is somehow a magic cure for a lot of these problems. Technology by itself never fixes anything and I say this as someone who is an IT professional.
I found it an interesting read, but was left wanting more from it in the end. Some of the observations about organisational hierarchy and culture I think are over simplified and at times plain wrong. As a companion to the book, I would recommend readers try "Good to Great" by Jim Collins, which deals with how some organisations make the jump and some don't. It's an interesting counterpoint, as it focusses a lot on effective management of people, any organisation's most valuable asset. Cluetrain is worth a read, but keep some salt handy....
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5.0 out of 5 stars Hello, are you reading this!, Oct. 27 2003
By 
A. M Wall "SEO Junkie..." (state college, pa United States) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Cluetrain Manifesto (Paperback)
Markets are converstions. When markets were created, the term market was a place where we came together to exchange goods and services, along with the stories of the grand ventures. Market was a place, not a verb. In the market people exchanged stories with their goods.
The industrial complex built up. Things became automated. Supply and demand seperated.
The web was created. The barriers between supply and demand erode. All along markets are conversations. Few businesses understand this, do you?
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5.0 out of 5 stars Packed with Knowledge!, Oct. 14 2003
By 
Rolf Dobelli "getAbstract" (Switzerland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Cluetrain Manifesto (Hardcover)
The Cluetrain Manifesto was one of the seminal books of the dot.com bubble era, but reading it now is like waking with a hangover and looking at all of the empty bottles, each of which seemed like a great idea at the time. The Internet changed everything, all right. Those who can bite back the irony long enough to see the big picture and keep reading will find some valuable practical advice on using the now-not-so-new-technology of the Web to do business more effectively. We recommend this pivotal book for the sake of your sense of perspective (or to give you a critically necessary background if you are too young to remember when Amazon was just a river.)
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2.0 out of 5 stars Markets are not conversations., June 16 2003
By 
Scott Harris (Florida, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Cluetrain Manifesto (Paperback)
If you prefer Hotwired to The Economist, James Carville to David Brinkley, and Tom Peters to Peter Drucker, you will probably enjoy this book. It cheers the power of the Internet to create productive informal relationships between people.
The book's primary message is "Markets are conversations." It should have been "Marketing is a conversation."
Economic transactions are the exchange of information as well as economic goods and money. The authors are right to condemn the traditional tendency to focus too much on the exchange of economic goods for money. By overstating their case, the authors imply that we can safely ignore the exchange of economic goods and money. As many dot.com investors learned the hard way, dominating a particular conversational niche on the Internet does not automatically lead to success in business.
As a book about marketing over the Internet, this book deserves four stars. As a book about Internet economics or information age management, it deserves none.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Markets are not conversations., June 16 2003
By 
Scott Harris (Florida, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Cluetrain Manifesto (Paperback)
If you prefer Hotwired to The Economist, James Carville to David Brinkley, and Tom Peters to Peter Drucker, you will probably enjoy this book. It cheers the power of the Internet to create productive informal relationships between people.
The book's primary message is "Markets are conversations." It should have been "Marketing is a conversation."
Economic transactions are the exchange of information as well as economic goods and money. The authors are right to condemn the traditional tendency to focus too much on the exchange of economic goods for money. By overstating their case, the authors imply that we can safely ignore the exchange of economic goods and money. As many dot.com investors learned the hard way, dominating a particular conversational niche on the Internet does not automatically lead to success in business.
As a book about marketing over the Internet, this book deserves four stars. As a book about Internet economics or information age management, it deserves none.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Business Protestantism, April 25 2003
This review is from: The Cluetrain Manifesto (Paperback)
So The Cluetrain Manifesto begins with 95 theses.
I get it, like Martin Luther's 95 theses against the Catholic church in 1517 started Protestantism.
Perhaps these authors mean for their treatise to be equally revolutionary. The format begs high expectations. I just can't help thinking, "Shakespeare said, 'First thing, let's kill all the lawyers.' You'd have to do that for this Openness in Business to work." So where are the lawyers in this groundbreaking philosophy for businesses?
It seems like businesses double-talk & obfuscate to protect themselves against liability. And I notice that none of the authors of this philosophy are lawyers.
And as for openness inside the company, we all know how long that would work. I don't see this book as revolutionary or practical. How do the authors tie in these exhortations to any current management philosophy?
Authors: Come down from your ivory tower and conduct some research in the 8-5 world.
If we need a parable, we'll turn to "Who Moved My Cheese?"
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5.0 out of 5 stars Old business paradigms are out the window! The web rules!, June 8 2002
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This review is from: The Cluetrain Manifesto (Paperback)
This thought-provoking book actually was one of the catalytic influences which dynamited me out of my complacency in terms of my own existing web site. Just like Dr. Martin Luther, posting his similarly disruptive "95 theses" on t"he Power and Efficacy of Indulgences" in 1517, Mssrs. Levine, Locke, Searls, and Weinberger put a definitive stop to the notion of "business as usual" in the newly "wired" world. It kind of reminds me of a next door neighbor I used to have: he predicted that the internet would be "a fad just like CB radio." In a pig's eye!
The co-authors assert that "markets are converstaions" and that they "consist of human beings, not demographic sectors." Much like this site, with the numerous hyperlinks, connecting YOU, the user with more information, logically organized, than you would be able to construct yourself, the authors also assert that "hyperlinks subvert heirarchy." In other words, if the shortest distance between you and the knowledge that you need is a short clickable link on the world wide web, executed by the 1/10th of an inch movement of your index finger on a mouse, the "priesthood of experts" fall.
This is an "in your face" book that should be read by EVERY entrepreneur, EVERY fee-for-service practitioner of ANY profession, and EVERYONE connected with modern networks and the internet. You will never look at the world, or business, the same way afterwards. And you will recognize that "eye candy" web sites with the same old advertising messages will no longer work.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Where's the beef..., June 5 2002
By 
Glenn E. Graham "Glenn Earl" (Pflugerville, TX USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Cluetrain Manifesto (Paperback)
This book starts great. The Author starts with some great insights on how the "business place" will be effected by the coming of the real information age, but instead of pulling all his ideas together he babbles on about his opinions. This book needed more data and concrete examples.
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