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5.0 out of 5 stars Hello, are you reading this!
Markets are converstions. When markets were created, the term market was a place where we came together to exchange goods and services, along with the stories of the grand ventures. Market was a place, not a verb. In the market people exchanged stories with their goods.
The industrial complex built up. Things became automated. Supply and demand seperated.
The...
Published on Oct. 27 2003 by A. M Wall

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars The end of business as usual
Hard to recommend such a small publication when the entire thing is now available for download at the website.
Markets are conversations. This is good.
Mass marketing is not a conversation. That is bad.
The authors leave themselves open to some fair criticism - their ideas aren't fully developed nor are their any clear suggestions as to implementation. It...
Published on Jan. 23 2004 by mbowman2


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2.0 out of 5 stars A foreign country, May 10 2001
By 
Mr. A. Pomeroy (Wiltshire, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Cluetrain Manifesto (Hardcover)
Very much a period piece now, this is separated from the present by a big glass wall. You can read it, and see how people thought things might have been, way back in 1998, a time when it looked as if 'the suits' were on the verge of being replaced by a new breed of business, and a new breed of businessperson. As one of the reviewers above says, "In a turn of events that will send shudders of terror through corporate America, most of the business-as-usual ways of thinking, acting, and talking, of the last century prove absolutely toxic to the would-be successful corporation doing business in this new medium." Except that the 'would-be successful corporations' are going to the wall at a rate of knots, and the 'business-as-usual' ways i.e. making a profit by selling stuff, turned out to be right after all. As for the 'markets as conversaions' model, does anybody actually relish going to the local used car emporium so that they can talk to the sales staff? People simply don't want to talk to Amazon.com as if it was a great friend, they just want to buy books with the minimum of fuss and effort. The future? People at home using digital television to access a handful of hand-picked shopping sites, with no access to, or desire to access, the old-fashioned internet.
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2.0 out of 5 stars Get the abridged version, March 1 2001
By 
Thomas D. Kehoe (Boulder, CO USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Cluetrain Manifesto (Paperback)
I forced myself to listen to the first one-third of the 6-hour Audible version. Get the abridged version instead.
This book has one good point: consumers don't like the way many companies talk -- "mission statements," fluffy advertising pitches, "your call is valuable to us" while they put you on hold for 30 minutes. In contrast, consumers respect companies that let you talk to a real person with the knowledge and power to solve your problem.
The book rightly says that the Internet can help companies to do the latter, instead of the former. That's everything worth reading in this book. Feel free to mail me the $... I've saved you. :-)
The authors take this one good point and repeat it endlessly. They don't give examples of how companies have implemented this good idea. They don't talk about possible pitfalls of taking this good idea too far. All they do is say how smart they are to have this one idea, and how stupid everyone else is. I suspect that the authors are consultants.
Strangely, this book doesn't talk about the Internet, post 1992. The authors rave about how great the Internet was in the 1980s. Newsgroups were populated by Ph.D.s and bright college students, passionate about their fields. This is true. When I got on the 'net in 1983, the people were wonderful. I met two girlfriends online.
But the Internet today is different. Better in many ways, but the chatter of most newsgroups and e-mail lists isn't worth reading. Spending time on-line with customers in my field is a waste of time. Many newsgroups started with smart people, but as stupid people (esp. stupid people with lots of time on their hands) joined and the signal/noise deteroriated, the smart people left to do more useful things, dropping the signal/noise ratio to zero. No mention of this problem in the "Cluetrain Manifesto".
The "Cluetrain Manifesto" doesn't explain how to design a website to improve feedback from customers. They don't talk about (to give three examples of bad design) websites that have no way to contact the company; "contact us" forms where you have to choose from their list of what they want you to say; and websites that make it easy to join, but have no way to quit (e.g., Audible.com, AllExperts.com). I get the impression that the "Cluetrain" authors haven't been in the Internet in the last 8 years.
--
Review by Thomas David Kehoe, author of "Hearts and Minds: How Our Brains Are Hardwired for Relationships"
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4.0 out of 5 stars One Great Thought Beat to Death 190 Times, Feb. 24 2001
By 
Robert David STEELE Vivas (Oakton, VA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Cluetrain Manifesto (Paperback)
There is one great thought in this book, i.e. that the Web makes it possible for everyone to participate in the "great conversation", and that it is the summing and slicing of these conversations that will drive business in the 21st Century.
The authors are quite correct, and helpful, when they point out that in the aggregate, the combined preferences, insights, and purchasing power of all Web denizens is vastly more valuable and relevant to business decisions about production, quality, and services than any "push" marketing hype or engineering presumptions about what people might need.
Sadly, the authors' neither provide an integrated understanding of the true terrain over which the great conversation takes place, nor do they provide any substantive suggestions for how web content managers might improve our access to the knowledge and desires that are now buried within the web of babel. Their cute "tell a story" and equally cute advice to have big boxes for customer stories in the forms provided for input, simply do not cut it with me.
This book is a 5 for the one great idea, a 2 for beating the idea to death, a 3 for presentation, and a 4 overall because it was just good enough to keep me reading to the last page.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Another Enthusiastic Futurist, Feb. 19 2001
By 
"_jlyle" (Decatur, GA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Cluetrain Manifesto (Hardcover)
This book makes a strong case for the way the internet changes all the rules. If you're not skeptical yet, you should be. The points are mostly valid, and you need to understand what they're saying, but as with a lot of other futurists (like Negroponte), the authors tend to forget things like gravity, friction, and market share. Visit the web site; save your money.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Good not great., Jan. 18 2001
By 
C. Winkler "C. Winkler" (Chicago, IL USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Cluetrain Manifesto (Paperback)
This book was insightful at times and over the top often. The book gives a good look at changes that need to take place at the heart of every business and why this is the case. The Internet is for communication. As this book gets older some of the things they observed early are coming true, while others are not. A good read, but slow and repetitive at times.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Worth both the Time and Money, Jan. 12 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Cluetrain Manifesto (Hardcover)
Very good book. It had my attention the whole way through it. It offers a unique perspective of what the Internet has done to change the landscape of 'traditional' business. Their words need to be heard by those running today's businesses, agree (with them) or not. I happen to agree with much of what they say.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars. What more could I say in a title?, Jan. 10 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Cluetrain Manifesto (Hardcover)
Many people happen to think this is a great book and I think it's definitely something that many business majors could benefit from. I'd advise people who don't find this book to be of any use or to be "nothing more than the ramblings of a number of self-appointed dot-com smart guys who have little or no experience in the real world of profit and loss" to stick to lower level reading and I think I'm not alone here judging by the other reviewers. "How-to's" are probably what you should be grazing on, spiteful remarks notwithstanding. As all successful businessmen know, and there are still many on the Web, it takes creative thinking to implement vision in real-world manifestations and this book is a great starting place for spurring that kind of thinking -- the now-cliched "Thinking out of the box." Anybody would rather devote several years of their lives to a project that's original enough to succeed and taking the thoughts in this book to heart is a great way to help assure that.
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1.0 out of 5 stars The Cluetrain Manifesto, Jan. 5 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Cluetrain Manifesto (Hardcover)
If I had seen this book in a bookstore, I would not have bought it, because it is printed in a too small, hard to read font. Besides that, the book is verbose and a waste of money.
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1.0 out of 5 stars Like, duh., Jan. 3 2001
By 
Sydney Rogers (Oceanside, California) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Cluetrain Manifesto (Hardcover)
I originally bought this book thinking that it might contain some useful business information. Surprise! It doesn't! Cluetrain Manifesto is nothing more than the ramblings of a number of self-appointed dot-com smart guys who have little or no experience in the real world of profit and loss. As the recent and ongoing dot-com implosion so aptly demonstrates, this balloon -- and this book -- is filled with nothing more than hot air.
Don't bother.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Finally .... Intelligence in Business!, Dec 13 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Cluetrain Manifesto (Hardcover)
I was extremely pleased to read this book because it was a validation of everything I tried to communicate to my former mindless employers. But for me, this book was too late. Otherwise I could have boldly pushed this book in their 'executive' faces. I know all too well the closed-mindedness, backwards-ness, reductionism, and secretiveness of the corporate business man and their complete ignorance of what the Internet means for business. I think I will send them each a copy of this book for x-mas.
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