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36 Reviews
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5.0 out of 5 stars Just what the doctor ordered
My father bought this book for me and it's been absolutely great to read and take notes from. It isn't deep, it isn't complicated, but it does have some very good information in it. I'm 21, about to graduate from college, and admittedly don't exactly have the best financial practices in the world. This book has already helped me get more organized and on-the-ball with...
Published on Oct. 19 2003 by David R. Munson

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1.0 out of 5 stars Tries to do too much and fails
Her first book was innovative and original--she was the first gen xer trying to speak to our generation.. This sequel is just a rip off. She's too old to be of interest to 20 somethings or 30 somethings for that matter (you might as well read Jane Bryant Quinn's book if you want an old woman's perspective). This is a cheap attempt to cash in on her earlier work and...
Published on June 2 2000


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5.0 out of 5 stars Just what the doctor ordered, Oct. 19 2003
By 
David R. Munson (Chicago, IL, United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
My father bought this book for me and it's been absolutely great to read and take notes from. It isn't deep, it isn't complicated, but it does have some very good information in it. I'm 21, about to graduate from college, and admittedly don't exactly have the best financial practices in the world. This book has already helped me get more organized and on-the-ball with my finances, though, and I think it's something I'll keep around as reference for some time. A previous reviewer complained that the book is shortsighted and only targeted at people in their 20s and 30s. Well, so what? If you want more in-depth, there are more than enough books out there to cover all the things you could possibly want to know. This isn't meant to be a guiding light for your personal finance from now until you die. it is meant for younger people and it serves them quite well, I think. It's not a limitless resource or something for people already well-versed in good personal finance management. If you're looking for a handy book with practical, real-world advice, though, then this should serve you quite well.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Finances made easier, June 20 2003
Finally, a book that doesn't assume your money woes are allowing your heirs to intherit their trust funds with as little tax as possible, finding the best long term care insurance, or how to save money by clipping coupons and doing every house project yourself. (I even read a book on frugality once that suggested getting a goat, because you won't have to mow your lawn anymore and you can have fresh milk everyday)
How about a book for someone who knows that the best time to invest is when you are young, but is intimidated by the purposefully complicated langauge of the financial world? That would be this book. It is written very comprehensively, occasionally so much so that it feels a little "dumbed down", but that is okay.
Get a financial life starts with the basics of the basics. Setting up a checking account and an emergency savings fund, and avoiding bank fees while you do it. I couldn't help but to think, if you are in your thirties and don't have a checking account yet, you need more help than this book could provide...but anyway, this book then goes on to cover credit cards, auto insurance, health insurance, 401k plans vs. IRAs and Roth IRA's, mutual funds. It does it in a way which is not so dry to read that you feel like falling asleep, and not so demanding that you know you will never be able to accomplish your finacial goals without spending your life huddled over a calculator.
I would gladly loan this book to anyone who is going to be on their own for the first time. You HAVE TO know this stuff if you are going to make it in the real world.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Easy Guide to a Financial Life, April 27 2003
By A Customer
Beth Kobliner's guide to getting a financial life is an easy to understand book. Kobliner broke the book up into different chapters such as banking, debt, insurance, etc. so that you can read the book straight through or read the various sections pertaining to you. Also, the first chapter is "Crib Notes" containing eight important steps to having a good financial life for time-pressed readers, or simply those who will never read the whole book.
Although the book is geared to those in their twenties and thirties, it has helpful information for anyone dealing with finances and how to secure your financial future. Kobliner not only advises you on what to do, but also gives you the resources, such as companies to contact for information on loans, insurance, and consolidating your debt.
The book is most helpful, because it gives you all the information that you should know, but probably don't. It covers just about everything one needs to know to establish a good financial life, and it's an easy book to get through.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An easy-to-use reference guide, Jan. 6 2002
I bought the original edition of this book after seeing Ms. Kobliner on a morning news program. I was rather uninformed about my finances at that point. I had several thousands of dollars of credit card debt, was about to finish grad school and get married, and didn't have a job waiting. Worried about merging my bad financial life with my future husband's relatively well-organized one, I bought this book.
Together, my husband and I read it and developed a road map for what we thought we needed to accomplish. It gave us the basics to get our financial life on track, including paying off all the credit card debt (we carry none at all), getting a mortgage, buying a new car, and starting retirement plans. Now that we arethinking about insurance, starting a family, planning for college funds, etc., this was the first place I thought to turn for well-seasoned advice.
This book covers a lot of topics in an accessible format, but I acknowledge that for someone who is already aware of their finances and has some knowledge, it may be repetitive. But I always find myself wanting to go back to it when I have questions--so today I'm buying the updated edition, and letting a financially challeneged friend keep the other one.
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5.0 out of 5 stars This Book Rocks., July 17 2001
By A Customer
Ok, to be frank, I love this book and frequently lend it to my 20/30 something friends. The following well-thought-out review applies to my experiences, too. (Cut and Paste Starts Here)
This updated version of Beth Kobliner's work (5/2000) can help the folks in their 20's and 30's get a handle on their finances. Even with a college education, most students fail to come away with sufficient knowledge on how to manage their dough. This book is an easy read, not filled with useless info. There is special emphasis on paying off college loans, getting credit cards, buying a car, and financing a first house or apartment. Things that you really need to know. The main chapters include: Figuring out Where You Are and Where You Want to Go, Finding the Best Loans and Getting Yourself Out of Hock, How to Get the Most from Your Bank for the Least Amount of Money, All You Really Need to Know About Investing, Living the Good Life in 2030 !!, Getting an Apartment or House of Your Own, What Insurance You Need and Don't, Finding the Right Policies and Forgoing Coverage You Don't Need, Making Your Life Less Taxing. There is info on using the Web to help you save, spend and invest wisely, how to refinance your high-rate debt and avoid hidden fees and traps, taking advantage of the latest tax breaks- including deductions for student loans, and planning your long range savings program. In addition, there are details on car leases, credit reports, mutual funds, and more. A wealth of information available for less than 12 bucks. Highly recommended. A great gift.
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5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent introduction to managing your finances, July 8 2001
By 
Anoop Ghanwani (Rocklin, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I bought an earlier version of this book way back in 1996. I had just gotten my first job and I was looking for information on how to manage money and to find out how much I could "afford" when buying a car and/or other expensive stuff. This book helped with all of that. It helped me understand the basics of personal finance, loans, insurance, 401(k), etc. There's lots of good advice in there, so I'd certainly recommend buying this book. The information is this book is beautifully organized and very easy to digest.
Unfortunately, I haven't learnt a whole lot about personal finance since reading this book. I've read numerous books on personal finance after this one. All of them tend to say more or less the same things as this book, but they haven't said it as well.
Bottomline, if you understand the basics of personal finance (such as the principles of compounding, the importance of investing early in a 401(k), why it's bad to have credit card debt, etc.), you can probably afford to skip this book. Otherwise, it's a must have.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Up-To-Date Edition Of The Popular Personal Finance Work, Aug. 9 2000
By 
Irvin Goodman - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This updated version of Beth Kobliner's work (5/2000) can help the folks in their 20's and 30's get a handle on their finances. Even with a college education, most students fail to come away with sufficient knowledge on how to manage their dough. This book is an easy read, not filled with useless info. There is special emphasis on paying off college loans, getting credit cards, buying a car, and financing a first house or apartment. Things that you really need to know. The main chapters include: Figuring out Where You Are and Where You Want to Go, Finding the Best Loans and Getting Yourself Out of Hock, How to Get the Most from Your Bank for the Least Amount of Money, All You Really Need to Know About Investing, Living the Good Life in 2030 !!, Getting an Apartment or House of Your Own, What Insurance You Need and Don't, Finding the Right Policies and Forgoing Coverage You Don't Need, Making Your Life Less Taxing. There is info on using the Web to help you save, spend and invest wisely, how to refinance your high-rate debt and avoid hidden fees and traps, taking advantage of the latest tax breaks- including deductions for student loans, and planning your long range savings program. In addition, there are details on car leases, credit reports, mutual funds, and more. A wealth of information available for less than 12 bucks. Highly recommended. A great gift.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent gift for those in their early 20s!, July 17 2000
By A Customer
It is a very easy read - and can either be read cover-to-cover, or you can read which chapters you think will help you most. I have had a hard time trying to read Rich Dad, Poor Dad (as it is rather boring), but this book was a great read. It really helps you understand different financial terms and how it effects you. Also, (not to be a dork, but...) it kinda empowers you by showing you how you can control your finanical situation - no matter if you make $10,000 a year or $100,000 a year.
I really, really recommend this book - it completely helped my husband & I figure out how to manage finances post-college and how to better our situation. Which also helps our relationship, because we don't have to argue about money - we developed a sound financial strategy which we both understand. I am not going to pretend it didn't take 7 months of mistakes to realize how important some things are :) Some things you just have to learn on your own!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Advice for young adults, Nov. 21 2002
By 
Mark D. Wolfinger (Evanston, IL United States) - See all my reviews
This book covers many of the basic requirements needed by those in the early stages of their financial lives. The advice is excellent and the author points out the importance of beginning a savings and investing program while still young. In addition, she covers many topics offering good guidance for her readers everyday lives, including how to decide between renting or buying, how to find a bank and choose the right type of account to open, etc. My only complaint with her advice is the suggestion readers "consider mutual funds your entire investment universe, at least for now." That is bad advice. Now is the time for learning how to invest in individual stocks and how to use options to make those investments safer. Learning how to make careful stock selections is worth the time and effort, and IMHO, using mutual funds is not the path to financial success.
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5.0 out of 5 stars This book changed my life, Aug. 14 2001
By 
L. Baptiste "lbaptiste" (Boston, MA) - See all my reviews
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I don't even remember where I heard about it, but I knew as soon as I read it (cover to cover - without hardly putting it down!)that my life was going to be different. From credit cards to renting to insurance to loans to everything else...Get A Financial Life continues to be my number 1 resource for all financial matters I come across and I don't see that changing anytime soon since there are many milestones that I have not yet passed. I keep the book on my desk and reach for it every couple of weeks to look up one thing or another. If all of that does not sell you on this book, I have since purchased 12 copies and I give them out as gifts to everyone that I know as young as 17 for birthdays, graduation and special occations. I think this book can help anyone. I HIGHLY recommend it!
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Get a Financial Life: Personal Finance In Your Twenties and Thirties
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