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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great foundation for anyone to build off of
I would consider myself young at 20, and discovering this book has changed my life. It provides a great foundation for communication with the people you work with and love. I've given this book as gifts numerous times, and i've read it numerous times myself, always coming out with something new.
I highly recommend this book to anyone looking to change their...
Published on March 5 2004 by Sean Reyes

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A Bill of Judeo-Christian Goods
This book poses as a guide to personal efficacy but is too deeply colored by Covey's religious views. Throughout it he speaks of "correct principals" which our clearly his Christian values. There are many great authors out there who have covered this ground with greater depth and made it more useful to the reader without trying to convert you to a their personal...
Published on Feb. 6 2002 by Jon Wilkerson


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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, Nov. 7 2014
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This review is from: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change (Paperback)
Best business book out there
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, Oct. 21 2014
Everything was good. Thanks
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Everything Covey says is either obvious or wrong, Sept. 1 1998
By A Customer
Anyone who needs a book to tell them that they ought to live life according to their deepest values has bigger problems than Covey--or anyone else--can solve. Are there really that many people who didn't know they could live life according to their personal values until Covey came along?
Covey regularly tries to apply analogies from how science works to how business should work--the problem is, he doesn't really understand how science works.
And he doesn't understand what a paradigm is, either. A paradigm shift involves a major shift in your entire view of the world--realizing the earth revolves around the sun, or that most of solid matter is really empty space--and doesn't apply to more localized revelations such as "I'm going to live a better life" or "I'm going to work the way I always wanted to"--the latter are smaller, localized changes that may be significant in an individual life, but are not on the scale of a true "paradigm shift." Covey, and other business pundits who've applied this word to the localized world of the office, have misused and weakened the language in the process.
I also found it irritating to see the examples Covey gave of how he applied his business knowledge to his own family. Even if his business examples work in a practical way in the office, running a family is not the same as running a company, and I can only hope some of his kids had the sense to get out of that household as soon as they were of age.
As for the business advice itself--well, either you can figure this stuff out yourself, or you're only working by rote anyway. I've seen all the people who say this book changed their lives. I can only think that it's a shame they had such shallow lives to begin with. I'm glad the book helped--but I'm dismayed to imagine people might be such poor thinkers that they need this book in the first place.
And ultimately, that's the real problem workplaces face. Put the self-help books aside, and learn how to think without being given step-by-step instructions for every task. You'll be far more valuable to your employer--and get far more out of your own life--than if you keep looking for someone else to give you rules and systems to follow.
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6 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The trouble with self help book and this one., March 9 2001
By 
"gosibro" (Athens Greece) - See all my reviews
I would like to say a few things about this book and the "genre", the category it fits in, the self help books in general, mainly because each text is a product of its format and its style greatly influences its content.
As with many, if not all, so called self help books this book is marred the following key problems or flaws:
1. It states and then repeats over and over again, overemphasizing to the point of tedium, the obvious and the common sense wisdom, failing to capture the finer details of the proposed subject and thus missing out on all the important variations of life. In this way it midguides the reader, forcing them to believe that the theory is the life they live in and that the map is indeed the territory.
2. It uses in mostly anecdotal (i.e. incidental) evidence and no scientific, philosophical, literary or other basis as a foundation and is thus very unreliable in the information it provides and can only justify its title (i.e. that it is actually helpful for oneself) if the reader accepts the whole system of thought and frame of mind of the author, his beliefs and values, his or her personal history and assigned meaning in life etc, otherwise it is useless. Missing out on the finer details as i mentioned in the first point i made, these book actually demand that the person replicates his or her self as an offshoot of the writer, allowing for little variety and imagination, and creative spirit, in life. The "wisdom" one can possess after reading such books can be found elsewhere in a more scientific and sinsere manner. Which brings me on to my next point.
3. These types of books are full of misconceptions and oversimplifications of psychological, philosophical, religious and otherwise spiritual works. They gratuitously ransack the good library books from their knowledge and wisdom and, with no references, they go about incorporating these elements to their own writing with different name tags or slightly modified content. Hence, the skill to read and understand any form of printed material, ranging from literature to poetry and from philosophy to science, and being able to adjust these skills to the text one is reading, becomes renamed as speed reading and most recently mutates to kevin treudau's ( i don't know if i 've spelt the name correctly) photoreading. Hypnosis skills get a yuppie make-over and turn into nlp, or some new age crap.
4. Most of them attempt to change the readers mind frame with positive hypnosis and affirmations and do not provide a long lasting effect so to speak, so it is not the info they provide that causes any effect one might have but the influence it exerts on the reader
5. Lastly, and this is a key point I am trying to make here, they are nothing but huge public relations enterprises, as other reviewers have mentioned before me, with the sole purpose of making the author rich and famous and his or her books best-sellers.
There are plenty other flaws one can point out but I 'll stay with these due to the lack of time and space.
About this book in particular. It is priviled enough to have each and every one of the above errors and a few unique ones. First of all, the author is in many cases patronising and bosses the reader around into believing his claims. I wonder is such a relationship or reader and auhor, one of command and subordination an "empowering" one to use one of the most loved terms of Covey. When I first read it in my public library I was astounded at how much of this book reads as gospel, a sacred definitive text on the human condition. With not a hint of distrust towards the validity of its claims or its0 historicity (i.e. it being just a product of a certain time and place, a society and a culture, an individual and hir or her souroundings.) For god's sake, even the number seven has mythical connotations as it is a "magic" symbolic number one finds in various cultures around the world. The main ideas of the book, the responsibility of the individual - a main existential idea of choice and commitment one can fully understand, grasp and practise in the works of sartre, neitsche, heidegger, ortega y gasset et al in philosophy and frankl, binswater, rollo may et al. (in fact Covey name drops some of this existential thinkers in but in a fragmeted, quotes out of context fashion) in existential psycotherapy, the second habit the one of "begining with the end in mind" and commiting themselves and "personal meaning" is again an existential offshoot and over-simplification of the human task to enhance the self, act rather than be acted upon, and assigning meaning to ones life, the third one "first things first" i.e. applying some sort of perspective in ones life and prioritizing is just plain common sense and i will not go in it, the next one to think win win, to care for your relationships with other people is straight forward moralism with no substance if applied the way he understands it and to care for the others as a means of achieving your goal of success is just too opportunistic and deceitful for my tastes, next listen empathically - well, well that's an original thought bravo mr. covey now how long did it take you to come to this conclusion, well, not enough space left due to the 1000 word limit, anyway you can imagine the rest...
This book as any other this talentless hack has written is an insult to the human mind and complexity, it chews and digests a wealth of knowledge, our human testament, and spits out an incoherent blather to the reader. Please, if you are not the narrow-minded yuppie sell-out success and control freak, but a wel meaning human being in every sense do not read this, or skim through it at the library at least. Try literature, or theatre or a good therapist or a good friend, or buy a book on existential psychology.
Thanks a lot to amazon for the space and to you for your time and effort, hope this review has something to say
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Patronising drivel, April 18 2000
By 
Simon Freedman (Staines, Middlesex United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
What can I say about this book that has not already been vociferouslysaid? Pure and utter drivel, insincere, self-satisfied, uselessdrivel. ( ) END
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5.0 out of 5 stars Very Good Book........READ IT !!!, March 17 1999
By 
Frank "kpbvi" (Atlanta, Georgia United States) - See all my reviews
This book got me Reading
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Aren't I wonderful and smart?, Feb. 11 2000
By 
Charlie (Joliet, Illinois) - See all my reviews
Stephen Covey likes himself more than I could stand. I tossed the book aside after a few chapters and haven't missed it since.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, Sept. 25 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
A classic for set-help
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Should have been called: "Personal Development For Dummies"!, Feb. 10 2002
How anyone could benefit from this book is beyond me!
Covey misunderstands key concepts of the psychological theories that he uses, and the "preachings" of integrity and personal values should bring nothing new to a fairly normal person.
"Don't lie, or people will eventually lose trust in you" is as groundbreaking and informative as writing "Don't bang your head repeatedly against the wall, or you will end up with a headache"!! This mix of Kant'ian and judeo-christian philosophy with popular psychology and painfully obvious common sense just doesn't cut it! Poor job, Stephen!!!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This book is totally USELESS............., Aug. 4 1999
By A Customer
Like I said in the title, this books really SUCKS. Stephen Covey hadn't helped me at all with the thousand page boredom with everyday common sense in it. When I first saw this book, I thought it was very helpful since so many people bought or recommended this book, but when I began to read it, I thought all of it was totally rubbish and nonsense with absolutely no help for me. All it talked about was beliefs, and it was meant to be something to change you're habits. If you're planning to buy this book, DON'T, as you will regret it. Instead, I would rather recommend "7 Habits for Highly Effective TEENS" for teenagers.
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