Customer Reviews


588 Reviews
5 star:
 (400)
4 star:
 (77)
3 star:
 (26)
2 star:
 (24)
1 star:
 (61)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great foundation for anyone to build off of
I would consider myself young at 20, and discovering this book has changed my life. It provides a great foundation for communication with the people you work with and love. I've given this book as gifts numerous times, and i've read it numerous times myself, always coming out with something new.
I highly recommend this book to anyone looking to change their...
Published on March 5 2004 by Sean Reyes

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars If you have ANY common sense, don't bother with this book.
This is nothing more than a collection of new industry/psycho babble that can be boiled down into one phrase: Use common sense. Covey is affiliated with the Franklin Time Management system which is a practical application for time management principles, but I still haven't figured out what value Covey has added to the organization. I did enjoy Covey's illustrations...
Published on April 22 1999


‹ Previous | 154 55 5659 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

5.0 out of 5 stars Very Good Book........READ IT !!!, March 17 1999
By 
Frank "kpbvi" (Atlanta, Georgia United States) - See all my reviews
This book got me Reading
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Aren't I wonderful and smart?, Feb. 11 2000
By 
Charlie (Joliet, Illinois) - See all my reviews
Stephen Covey likes himself more than I could stand. I tossed the book aside after a few chapters and haven't missed it since.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, Sept. 25 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
A classic for set-help
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Should have been called: "Personal Development For Dummies"!, Feb. 10 2002
How anyone could benefit from this book is beyond me!
Covey misunderstands key concepts of the psychological theories that he uses, and the "preachings" of integrity and personal values should bring nothing new to a fairly normal person.
"Don't lie, or people will eventually lose trust in you" is as groundbreaking and informative as writing "Don't bang your head repeatedly against the wall, or you will end up with a headache"!! This mix of Kant'ian and judeo-christian philosophy with popular psychology and painfully obvious common sense just doesn't cut it! Poor job, Stephen!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This book is totally USELESS............., Aug. 4 1999
By A Customer
Like I said in the title, this books really SUCKS. Stephen Covey hadn't helped me at all with the thousand page boredom with everyday common sense in it. When I first saw this book, I thought it was very helpful since so many people bought or recommended this book, but when I began to read it, I thought all of it was totally rubbish and nonsense with absolutely no help for me. All it talked about was beliefs, and it was meant to be something to change you're habits. If you're planning to buy this book, DON'T, as you will regret it. Instead, I would rather recommend "7 Habits for Highly Effective TEENS" for teenagers.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Barf!, April 9 2001
By A Customer
This book was highly recommended to me by a man I later broke up with which should have been a clue right there.
I couldn't make it through the first chapter of this book without getting a headache largely due to Mr. Covey's unbearable mangling of the English language.
Covey should have first taken a course in the "Seven Habits of Highly Effective WRITING" before crafting this tedious read.
My suggestion? Don't waste your money. Read the classics read, the writings of Marcus Aurelius, read ANYTHING, but this.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A grand waste of time and money., Aug. 3 1998
By 
Robert L. Miller "avid reader" (Irvine, California, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I really wanted to like this book. I was looking forward to this book. The hype was incredible. But what I was treated to was nothing but repetition, repetition, repetition. Sure, things are how you look at it. But where do we go from here? Do I need 100 pages of the old woman/young woman optical illusion that we have ALL seen in school? I don't think so. Covey's statements of personal faith are not going to be agreeable with all religions, and frankly, were irrelevant to the book. The First Habit, for me, is going to be not wasting my time with books such as this. I was severely disappointed.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 30 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars rhetoric combats rhetoric, Oct. 10 2002
By A Customer
We live in a society that teaches us to be passive and rely on experts for our decision making. All our media is based on noninteractive mediums often supplemented by laugh tracks to tell us when we are happy and creepy music to tell us when we are scared. Fear and confusion are the tools by which people are turned into sheep with a checkbook. It begins in compulsory education systems where we are given a question and the answer and then asked the question (how many of those answers have you later found to be lies). Your thoughts are not required but your complacency is demanded. We have our issues framed in such a way that we debate only a list of sanctioned and approved alternatives with no discussion of that which has been deemed counter-revolutionary by the powers that be, and dissent will not be tolerated. Once we were told what to think, now we are simply told not to. The news comes complete with analysis of how it will impact your life so all you need to do is sit back offer blind faith in the mega-corporations that bring you the 5-oclock news and the Seven Habits of Highly Deceptive People.
The motive behind this learned helplessness is to homogenize us into targetable markets and prepare us for the sales pitch offering what we have just been told we need in order to bring fulfillment to our unsatisfying and tame lifestyles of servitude to others. The media has told us what is attractive, what is just and what the good-life is, which avails a new market of telling us how to cope with the frustration of having our thoughts dictated by external profit seekers...Enter the Oprah-Covey-Dr. Phill solution. Tell me I have problems, tell me what they are, tell me how to fix them and I will pretend I believe you care about me more than another ivory back-scratcher you can spend my 3 easy payments on.
We spend millions on infomercial products telling us how to increase our IQ 30 points, reduce cellulite, and make a fortune in real-estate, all by devoting ten minutes a week and sending our check or money order to address on the screen without ever leaving the sofa.
As we watch talk shows bring in the so called 'specialists', we remove ourselves from real problems that cause us real stress and focus on masters of rhetoric peddling easy answers to indirect questions. Do we need to follow the 'correct map', or do we need involve ourselves in direct action and reaction to events and circumstances of our life as is best judged by our own undiluted thoughts. As any good marketing class will teach you, repetition creates truth. The incessant references to ambiguous entities of inner power and paradigm maps along with blurred calls to action involving centering one's self and shifting paradigms offer little certainty when action is called for in our lives.
Eventually a person gets tired of hearing all the ways we are told how to cope and that it's gonna be alright and, only then, real change can happen. It does not require shifting a paradigm map but it might require unleashing the harness we are bound by and going down to city hall. It may require you to develop distrust of the mainstream mass media and question the motives behind those trying to influence you. You might need to make tangible changes to your lifestyle and remove yourself from situations where you are powerless, you might need to question your involvement in systems of exploitation, and you may need to be much less tame.
The most important thing is to believe change in your life will come from yourself and not the expert. The painful truth is that the expert doesn't care about you or your unsatisfying life. They have no idea how to solve your problems and no motivation to do so, particularly when they have a new self help cook-book coming out next spring and have already added your name to their marketing list.
If your life needs change, you need to change it yourself. You are not helpless, and you have everything you need to do it already. If it is self-help you seek, Covey-help will get you nowhere. Everyone has an agenda and most of them need your credit card number. It can be dangerous to believe that this rhetoric will bring you more than the temporary illusion that you have taken control of your life when all you have done is tightened the shackles that bind you the source of dissatisfaction you sought to free yourself from.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Great oncepts buried in personal experiences., Feb. 9 2003
By A Customer
This very popular book provides a wealth of information, unfortunately poorly written and poorly edited. The great concepts are lost with the author boring his readers with his long winded personal examples of his experiences with his wife and son. It becomes obvious that the author does not or cannot follow his own process, or is so emotionally attached to his personal life experiences that he believes he must blather on and on about his life. So the reader yoyo's up and down with interesting thought provoking ideas following by innane personal experiences of the author.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars 7 habits, Dec 30 2011
This review is from: The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change (Paperback)
Book was shipped quickly and arrived in the condition promised by the seller. I'm very satisfied with my purchase. I would purchase from this seller again. Peace peace.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 154 55 5659 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People: Powerful Lessons in Personal Change
Used & New from: CDN$ 4.57
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews