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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The beauty of thinking
This book should be read by every business student. It is a perfect summary of 20th century's industrial development.
This book also provides a perfect insight to large scale academic programs and reseachs. Every student reading this book will gain much more than taking 2 or 3 courses in an MBA program. This book has much to offer than any of the books that I have...
Published on Nov. 17 2003 by Aydin Ozol

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3.0 out of 5 stars Don't "Machine" - try "Lean" instead
If you are just starting out learning about Lean Manufacturing, and you only have time to read one book, "The Machine that Changed the World" is an historically important book but "Lean Thinking" is the one that actually gets you started toward implementation. It's one of those rare occasions where the sequel was better than the original.
Published on Jan. 2 2003


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The beauty of thinking, Nov. 17 2003
By 
This book should be read by every business student. It is a perfect summary of 20th century's industrial development.
This book also provides a perfect insight to large scale academic programs and reseachs. Every student reading this book will gain much more than taking 2 or 3 courses in an MBA program. This book has much to offer than any of the books that I have read. It makes you think and then gives the answers and at the end it presents with you issues to think further.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Seminal Work, Jan. 4 2012
By 
GLEN (Vancouver, BC.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Machine That Changed the World: The Story of Lean Production-- Toyota's Secret Weapon in the Global Car Wars That Is Now Revolutionizing World Industry (Paperback)
For anyone learning about Lean, this book needs to be a part of your repertoire. It is a bit technical at times but has lots of solid background about how Lean processes are meant to work as taught by the men who coined the term "Lean" in the first place.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great book, introduction to lean production., Sept. 8 2013
By 
german trejo (REDDING, CA, US) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Machine That Changed the World: The Story of Lean Production-- Toyota's Secret Weapon in the Global Car Wars That Is Now Revolutionizing World Industry (Paperback)
A must read book for lean production introduction, the Western, and Japanese culture, Detroit and Japanese way in automotive industry.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Understanting the Toyota Way, Feb. 21 2004
By 
Cleber Favaro "Cleber" (Sao Paulo, SP Brazil) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Since the beginning of the 50's, Toyota has been a making a revolution in the way corporation works. A real unique approach named lean has been allowing the company to achieve superior performance concurrently in manufacturing, product development and suppliers management. The Machine brings to the reader a wide explanation of "Toyota Way". If you are looking for a book about Lean and you'd like to understand Toyota, it certainly should be your first choice!
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4.0 out of 5 stars a Manufacturing Mustread, April 24 2003
By 
J. head (littlteton, nh USA) - See all my reviews
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The Machine That Changed the World; The Story of Lean Production
A great book that although becoming a little outdated portrays the ongoing trends in the automobile production industry in three major cultural areas.
The three areas are;the Asian lean production (Toyota) v.s. the American system,(mass production) v.s. the European craftsman system. On a larger scale it will and is affecting manufacturing everywhere.
Henry Ford was the founder of the American mass production system, and Ford was very successful adopting it to the aircraft and steel industries. American companies adopted this system and it is one of the main reasons for American pre-eminence in many industries worldwide. Toyota has become the founder of the Lean system of manufacturing. Most of the
early adherents to this system were other large Japanese companies, and responsible for the Japanese manufacturing miracle since the 1960's, as it was adapted from automotive to all manner of industries.
The book is well written and interesting even though it is based on an MIT study of global trends in the auto industry. I would like to see an update to this book. The one anomaly I see is the German Automobile industry. If Japan and Korea have some of the most efficient auto manufacturing plants in the world and
North America is becoming more competitive, what is happening in Europe comes as no surprise. Many European automakers have yet to fully embrace American mass production techniques and are now faced with the greater efficiencies of Lean
production. The book does not explain in my mind the success of the German Auto industry. It seems to be the one exception to the rule.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Don't "Machine" - try "Lean" instead, Jan. 2 2003
If you are just starting out learning about Lean Manufacturing, and you only have time to read one book, "The Machine that Changed the World" is an historically important book but "Lean Thinking" is the one that actually gets you started toward implementation. It's one of those rare occasions where the sequel was better than the original.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Lean should be a journey not a destination, Nov. 10 2002
By 
loay sehwail (Stillwater, Oklahoma, United States) - See all my reviews
This is the first book that I planned to read as a part of learning about lean, the other two books are "Lean thinking" and "Becoming Lean" , so far I could say that the "Machine that Changed the World" is a good benchmarking between craft, mass and lean producers. It mainly gives you an insight of the differences between lean and mass producers from the production, sales, marketing, customer relation and other dimensions. If you don't know about lean I really recommend you to start by reading his book because it will make you start to think in a lean way, if you know about lean and convinced about what it can do to you organization start with lean thinking and then go to "Becoming Lean".
This book is aimed at strategic level and as a key tool to convince old timers about the lean-mentality against the push-mentality.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Introductory Book, June 29 2002
By 
kmaverick78 "kmaverick" (Hollywood, FL United States) - See all my reviews
I usually refer to this kind of books as "Open Minds", are written in a very simple way that may seem that the content is simple, BUT IS NOT. This book is in my opinion a must read for any Industrial Engineers, Managers, Supervisors. It can be used also for training and kaizen events.
Silly is that one that reads this book expecting that he will know everything about lean manufacturing, JIT, or modern IE.
In summary, this book is the entrance to a new world with a new way of thinking and doing thins and it is a necessary complement to any technical book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Mistake, June 18 2002
By A Customer
The Machine that Changed the World has been published more than once. Amazon, you're offering a special "buy these 2 titles, and save", but they are the exact same book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars The world has changed, Dec 27 2001
By 
B.Sudhakar Shenoy (India) - See all my reviews
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This book is a classic on the advantages of being lean - Product Design, Manufacturing, Supply Chain Management - the entire gamut from concept to delivery in the Automobile industry.
What Ford's mass production did to craft production and its profound effects on the developed economies in the first half of the last century is an old but interesting story. With the advent of Ford's manufacturing techniques, there was a consolidation in the Auto industry. Within a couple of decades the number of automobile manufacturers fell from over a hundred to less than twenty and the big three cornering over ninety percent of the market share. Detroit became the center of pilgrimage for the rest of the world trying to emulate and replicate this success story in other continents.
Silently, the Japanese led by Toyota were working on a different concept of putting the automobile in the hands of the customer, at better quality, lesser costs, shorter development times and with the ability to offer a wider choice. The statistics collected from these "lean systems" is mind boggling. The competitive advantage that Japan enjoyed over the American system was neither due to lower wages in Japan nor due to higher levels of automation as widely believed. It was primarily the lean machine that was conquering the mass machine.
This book is based on the research done in the 1980's and published around 1990. The authors while acclaiming lean manufacturing as the panacea for the ills of manufacturing systems globally had at the time of the research and the publication of this work, probably ignored the next major change that would sweep across continents. Cars ride on highways, but today's businesses are quickly shifting gear and using a super fast highway for collaborating and for managing their global presence. Thanks to the Internet, the economics of information is transforming the economics of things. Dell is probably a good example of the new business model that could not have been imagined in the 80's. The tearing down of artificial walls across countries and continents also happened in the last decade.
We are badly in need of a repeat research study of the kind done in this book, in the face of the new realities. Global companies run by global citizens serving a global market and using a global currency will probably happen sooner than we expect.
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