Customer Reviews


10 Reviews
5 star:
 (1)
4 star:
 (4)
3 star:
 (3)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


4.0 out of 5 stars Near The Top of the First 10
I started reading these E-books of the various Star Trek incarnations several weeks ago, and, "Genesis Wave Book #1", is the 10th that I have read. It is the first in a trilogy, but if this beginning is an indication of the next 2 books, the series will rank amongst the best I will have read after completing the first dozen Trek books. I will be reading the next 2 books...
Published on Feb. 17 2003 by taking a rest

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars It could have been so much better...
This covers the first two parts of Mr. Vornholt's Genesis Wave trilogy. I'm not going to talk about the implausibility of waves moving at greater than lightspeed. I'm not going to talk about the number of decks on the Defiant or the location of its bridge or its crew complement. But am I the only one who noticed that Maltz's nightmarish experiences with the Genesis...
Published on Feb. 10 2002 by L. S. Mooney


Most Helpful First | Newest First

4.0 out of 5 stars Near The Top of the First 10, Feb. 17 2003
I started reading these E-books of the various Star Trek incarnations several weeks ago, and, "Genesis Wave Book #1", is the 10th that I have read. It is the first in a trilogy, but if this beginning is an indication of the next 2 books, the series will rank amongst the best I will have read after completing the first dozen Trek books. I will be reading the next 2 books in the coming week, so if you wish for a complete impression from one reader of the three part story arc you will not have long to wait.
Project Genesis will be very familiar to all fans who recall one of the earlier films to feature the original crew of the Enterprise. In addition to familiar faces the movie also included the son of Captain Kirk who played a key role in the development of the Genesis project. The book brings back some characters from the original research team, one who remains in her original form, and two who have yet to be explained by book's end. Like many weapons of Science Fiction or in our own world, science can not leave a project alone no matter what the possible consequences may be. The irony here is that after some 90 years of Genesis being kept at the highest levels of clearance requirements it appears once again, but this time seemingly uncontrolled and doing damage exponentially greater than the original.
The chief engineer is an extremely capable Starfleet officer, but as Data humorously reminds him he is inept with women. It could be argued that Data has had more success with carbon-based life forms that Geordi has. And as a side story in this tale Data repeatedly attempts to help his dear friend succeed where he has only failed before. A character that Geordi had once created on the Holodeck and then fell deeply in love with only to be caught with his Holodeck fantasy by the real woman, the real married woman, once again makes an appearance as a critical player in this book and likely in the following two, Dr. Leah Brahms. And she brings with her a Klingon that will be the last Klingon you would expect to see, but does serve to tie this 90 year separation of common Genesis events together.
This tale has many of the great aspects that make for a good Trek tale, a visit from the past by both characters that were enjoyable, and an event long since believed dead, and then the forced cooperation of species like those from Romulus, Klingons, and a variety of peoples from the Federation. In the midst of all this is the charismatic figure of Captain Jean Luc Picard who always adds to whatever situation he is in the midst of. And depending on the outcome of this first cliffhanger of book #1, another question is will he remain a Captain?
So far so good, and I will keep moving toward the middle with Book #2, and the conclusion of Book #3.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Genesis is back, June 1 2004
By 
B. Gale (Davis, CA, USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Fans familiar with the Star Trek movies will recognize the title of the book from events in Star Trek II: The Wrath of Kahn. This book takes the Genesis Device to a whole new level. Someone has stolen the Genesis Device technology, and weaponized it! Along with the technology that was stolen Dr. Marcus is also taken from her secret Federation facility for unknown reasons. Terror reigns on the scale that no one ever dreamed, not just planetary but against entire solar systems. It seems that the Genesis Device works flawlessly, but who started it? And why?
This book is thoroughly enjoyable and a blast to read. It ties in story lines from the original Star Trek and the Next Generation seamlessly.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars A wave of terror sweeps across the galaxy, Jan. 18 2003
An intense page turner, this book is the first of three about a terrible menace, the Genisis Wave. It's creator has been kidnapped, and six months later the wave is unleashed. On the first planet in it's path, Leah Braums is testing a new experimental radiation suit.....she is inside when the wave passes over the planet, changing everything around her and killing billions of people in an instant. She makes a mission to swiftly move before it's path, telling someone who will listen to save lives.
She is found by the Enterprise, after picking up a few survivors, one who has information about what they're up against. Soon after, they race the clock, and must share this secret information with the Romulans and Klingons who all pull in to help with the rescue efforts, although thier intentions aren't entirely benevolant.
This first book leaves you hanging only minutes before the Genisis wave hits the planet, with Starfleet personell, including Geordi LaFordge, on the planet with some special shelters based on the ratiaion suit design. To add to some mystery, another vessel, which Dr. Crusher has taken command of begins behaving erratically, going against orders. I'm glad I had the second book on hand right then!
This is a thoroughly enjoyable read, and a well thought out story, however, I don't really care for the three book delivery method, a giant novel would have been better.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars Comic book-ish, March 10 2002
By 
Dustin D. Berger (Denver, CO United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I was fairly disappointed with this whole series. Of course, the Genesis technology that was introduced in The Wrath of Khan was a great story device. I expected that this novel would be very exciting and rich with "historical" detail.
In my opinion, the challenge with writing for Star Trek characters is to create an engrossing and exciting story, in spite of the familiarity of the characters and environment. In a way, the villains, story lines, and settings need to be even more vivid and realistic when using our familiar Trek settings. This is especially true when an aspect of Trek history, like the Genesis Wave, is selected for the center of the story. Unfortunately, this book focuses almost excluslively on plot; it neglects the care needed with the characters.
All of the regular crew are portrayed in a comic book-like fashion. Their actions and dialog are typical of their characters. Nothing surprising or innovative occurs where the characters are concerned. Geordi, in particular, is dull. He spends most of the time reacting to events and people around him.
There are a few decent characters in the book. The klingon Maltz returns from ST3 to play a large part in this story. Also, Leah Brahms has an interesting part to play. But, Dr. Carol Marcus lacks even the depth that she had in her small role in The Wrath of Khan.
The foe that Vornholt imagines up to wreak the Genesis wave on the galaxy is entirely new. Of course, to wreak such epic havoc on the galaxy, a strong characterization was called for. This was the most critical aspect of the story that was absent. These adversaries simply were not adequately included in the story.
I think that this book was based on an interesting but artificial premise, and the result is a story that feels artificial from beginning to end. For a far better read, try The Rise and Fall of Khan Noonien Singh.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars It could have been so much better..., Feb. 10 2002
By 
L. S. Mooney "Syd (not particularly vicious)" (Montebello, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This covers the first two parts of Mr. Vornholt's Genesis Wave trilogy. I'm not going to talk about the implausibility of waves moving at greater than lightspeed. I'm not going to talk about the number of decks on the Defiant or the location of its bridge or its crew complement. But am I the only one who noticed that Maltz's nightmarish experiences with the Genesis Wave could NEVER have happened?? According to "The Wrath of Khan", Khan detonated the only Genesis device in existence, creating the Genesis planet but leaving no working models behind. So Maltz, who didn't come along until "The Search for Spock", could not possibly have had personal experience of the Genesis Effect--he saw only the report the Klingon spy Valkris transmitted to Kruge (and which showed the Effect as red, not green, by the way), and the Genesis planet's self-destruction, which involved nothing like the original wave.
This, of course, makes Maltz's blood quest to destroy the creator of the Genesis Device, Dr. Carol Marcus, a plot contrivance of global proportions.
That massive quibble out of the way, I found much of both books dragged--and considering how fast the Wave was moving through space, that was an unpleasant surprise. Also, the events at which Book One ended, the "To be continued" point chosen, seemed more awkward than suspensful. It truly felt like a single good story padded to make two books. And while most of the non-TNG characters were believable and well-rounded, Picard and Co. came off much less so. (For example, unlucky-at-love Geordi is getting a little old....)
I've enjoyed most of Mr. Vornholt's other TNG novels...I wish these two could have earned the same comment. If I decide to buy Book Three, it'll be the $7 paperback off a used-book rack, not the triple-that-price hardcover.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars It could have been so much better..., Feb. 10 2002
By 
L. S. Mooney "Syd (not particularly vicious)" (Montebello, CA USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This covers the first two parts of Mr. Vornholt's Genesis Wave trilogy. I'm not going to talk about the implausibility of waves moving at greater than lightspeed. I'm not going to talk about the number of decks on the Defiant or the location of its bridge or its crew complement. But am I the only one who noticed that Maltz's nightmarish experiences with the Genesis Wave could NEVER have happened?? According to "The Wrath of Khan", Khan detonated the only Genesis device in existence, creating the Genesis planet but leaving no working models behind. So Maltz, who didn't come along until "The Search for Spock", could not possibly have had personal experience of the Genesis Effect--he saw only the report the Klingon spy Valkris transmitted to Kruge (and which showed the Effect as red, not green, by the way), and the Genesis planet's self-destruction, which involved nothing like the original wave.
This, of course, makes Maltz's blood quest to destroy the creator of the Genesis Device, Dr. Carol Marcus, a plot contrivance of global proportions.
That massive quibble out of the way, I found much of both books dragged--and considering how fast the Wave was moving through space, that was an unpleasant surprise. Also, the events at which Book One ended, the "To be continued" point chosen, seemed more awkward than suspensful. It truly felt like a single good story padded to make two books. And while most of the non-TNG characters were believable and well-rounded, Picard and Co. came off much less so. (For example, unlucky-at-love Geordi is getting a little old....)
I've enjoyed most of Mr. Vornholt's other TNG novels...I wish these two could have earned the same comment. If I decide to buy Book Three, it'll be the...paperback off a used-book rack, not the triple-that-price hardcover.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3.0 out of 5 stars Not great, but not bad, Jan. 1 2002
By 
I gave this book three stars, mainly due to the fact it is fairly medicore, and would have been two if not for the excellent characterisations of Geordi and Leah Brahms.
The book basically deals with the genesis wave from star trek II and III being enhanced and then unleashed on the Federation after Carol Marcus is abducted.
The actual plot isn't that bad, the wave starts off in the outskirts of the Federation then heads inwards, and after a couple of systems are destroyed, Starfleet responds, realising the wave will eventually threaten Earth as well as a fair chunk of Romulan space.
The writing is fairly solid, I found Picard to be pretty dull in this book, and some of the others were hardly seen or heard, but Crusher did have a nice role, it was good how Vornholt actually had Crusher talking about Wes, we rarely hear Crusher now.
Vornhole really puts some effort into using many of the different races within the Federation, Tellarites, Capellans, Deltans, some of those races are rarely ever seen or heard of.
The part of the book I have a serious problem with is the scale of the destruction. The wave wipes out over thirty million people on the first few planets it wipes out, and Starfleet, Picard in particular, just seem to accept that without any sort of grief or sorrow, while the loss of 10 Enterprise crewmembers is a tremendous tragedy, as if death from genocide is some sort of galactic constant and no more needs to be said on it, completely ridiculous.
I also don't like the format Vornhole has written the book in (or the format the publishers chose, I don't know which). The font change is okay, but at the beginning of each chapter the format is changed, I prefer the old format with the Starfleet symbol.
I also don't like the technical side of the genesis wave, how can a wave be generated from a simple device have enough power to wipe out and recreate an entire planet? But the biggest problem is the travel factor, the wave starts at the edge of the Federation and moves in, and within a week or so is threatening Earth. That's ridiculous, there would have to be a couple of thousand light years distance there, and waves can't travel faster than the speed of light(physics IS constant).
Like I said before, the book isn't a bad read, but it isn't an exceptionally good read either, think twice before buying it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Should be a movie!!!, Dec 7 2001
By A Customer
"The Genesis Wave" is a great story that re-introduces us to the Genesis project from Star Trek II as well as the movie characters of Klingon Warrior Maltz and Dr. Carol Marcus. Good to find out what happened to both characters after the events of Wrath of Khan. This movie depics adventure, mystery, as well as little bit of romance and emotions. Also the story shows some of our Next Generation Characters in some different light. We see Dr. Crusher ,being emotional over her son Wesley and Troi being a little more aggressive with her duties and peers. This was a great story that ,in my mind would have made a great Next Generation film.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2.0 out of 5 stars Too Unlikely, Aug. 21 2001
By 
Thomas Eddy (Fayetteville, GA) - See all my reviews
John Vornholt forgets one of the most important aspects of Star Trek - you have to make the science believable. The problem with the Genesis Wave is that waves cannot travel faster than the speed of light. Vornholt nowhere explains how the wave travels at warp speed. Also, when it goes through a star system it seems to slow down (also unexplained). Lastly, it threatens earth but originates from a far corner of the Federation. It would take months (if not years) to travel that distance at the highest warp speeds. Vornholt does not offer an explanation for this either. This was one of the most disappointing series of Star Trek books that I have ever read.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars Star Trek II meets The Next Generation, Jan. 1 2001
I'm a causal Star Trek fan, seen maybe half-a-dozen episodes of the original series, perhaps thirty of `Next Generation' and `Voyager', and at the most three of `Deep Space Nine' (I'm sorry but Star Trek was meant to be set on a spaceSHIP not a space STATION).
It's a bit different when it comes to the films. Something about their larger scale and them being full of series-changing moments appeals to me more. I'm always felt `Star Trek II' was the best of the lot. The awesome destructiveness of Genesis torpedo was one of a host of ideas that gave us one of science fiction's masterpieces.
I must admit I've always wondered from time to time whatever happened to this technology in the `Next Generation' world. John Vornholt attempts to answer this question in his latest novel `The Genesis Wave'. I listened to the abridged audio version of this book, read by Tim Russ.
Generally, I enjoyed this story, through, like reviews have said, it's ending with the 'To be continued, buy the next book in April 2001.' is very irritating. The act of cutting it into two parts smells heavily of a marketing ploy.
Through, all in all, this is an interesting listen; some points really don't sound true. (WARNING! Spoilers ahead!) An entire section of Federation space goes missing and it takes Georgi LaForge's message not getting a reply before anyone notices? I don't care if it's a backwater section of space, I live in a backwater section of my state and if we went missing people would notice it a lot quicker than this so-called advanced society.
I think Dr. Crusher is a fine officer. She's proven that on innumerable occasions. But why in the heck put her in charge of an abandoned starship? She's a DOCTOR for crying out loud! That just seems really stupid! (Here ends the spoilers)
Tim Russ (best known as Tuvok on `Star Trek; Voyager') gives us a fine performance reading, with an impressive ability to use a different but real-sounding voice for each character without having them sound too much alike. The one major problem with him is that his takes on Data and Piccard are very close but just off-sounding enough to remind us we're listening to someone else play their characters each time we hear them.
All in all, despite it's problems and the fact that it's abridged (which I normally hate), I liked this and recommend you give it a shot as your next Star Trek fix. (Plus it's a couple bucks cheaper than the actual book)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First
ARRAY(0xae741288)

This product

STAR TREK THE NEXT GENERATION: THE GENESIS WAVE: BOOK ONE.
Used & New from: CDN$ 0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews