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This covers the first two parts of Mr. Vornholt's Genesis Wave trilogy. I'm not going to talk about the implausibility of waves moving at greater than lightspeed. I'm not going to talk about the number of decks on the Defiant or the location of its bridge or its crew complement. But am I the only one who noticed that Maltz's nightmarish experiences with the Genesis Wave could NEVER have happened?? According to "The Wrath of Khan", Khan detonated the only Genesis device in existence, creating the Genesis planet but leaving no working models behind. So Maltz, who didn't come along until "The Search for Spock", could not possibly have had personal experience of the Genesis Effect--he saw only the report the Klingon spy Valkris transmitted to Kruge (and which showed the Effect as red, not green, by the way), and the Genesis planet's self-destruction, which involved nothing like the original wave.
This, of course, makes Maltz's blood quest to destroy the creator of the Genesis Device, Dr. Carol Marcus, a plot contrivance of global proportions.
That massive quibble out of the way, I found much of both books dragged--and considering how fast the Wave was moving through space, that was an unpleasant surprise. Also, the events at which Book One ended, the "To be continued" point chosen, seemed more awkward than suspensful. It truly felt like a single good story padded to make two books. And while most of the non-TNG characters were believable and well-rounded, Picard and Co. came off much less so. (For example, unlucky-at-love Geordi is getting a little old....)
I've enjoyed most of Mr. Vornholt's other TNG novels...I wish these two could have earned the same comment. If I decide to buy Book Three, it'll be the $7 paperback off a used-book rack, not the triple-that-price hardcover.
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This covers the first two parts of Mr. Vornholt's Genesis Wave trilogy. I'm not going to talk about the implausibility of waves moving at greater than lightspeed. I'm not going to talk about the number of decks on the Defiant or the location of its bridge or its crew complement. But am I the only one who noticed that Maltz's nightmarish experiences with the Genesis Wave could NEVER have happened?? According to "The Wrath of Khan", Khan detonated the only Genesis device in existence, creating the Genesis planet but leaving no working models behind. So Maltz, who didn't come along until "The Search for Spock", could not possibly have had personal experience of the Genesis Effect--he saw only the report the Klingon spy Valkris transmitted to Kruge (and which showed the Effect as red, not green, by the way), and the Genesis planet's self-destruction, which involved nothing like the original wave.
This, of course, makes Maltz's blood quest to destroy the creator of the Genesis Device, Dr. Carol Marcus, a plot contrivance of global proportions.
That massive quibble out of the way, I found much of both books dragged--and considering how fast the Wave was moving through space, that was an unpleasant surprise. Also, the events at which Book One ended, the "To be continued" point chosen, seemed more awkward than suspensful. It truly felt like a single good story padded to make two books. And while most of the non-TNG characters were believable and well-rounded, Picard and Co. came off much less so. (For example, unlucky-at-love Geordi is getting a little old....)
I've enjoyed most of Mr. Vornholt's other TNG novels...I wish these two could have earned the same comment. If I decide to buy Book Three, it'll be the...paperback off a used-book rack, not the triple-that-price hardcover.
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on January 1, 2002
I gave this book three stars, mainly due to the fact it is fairly medicore, and would have been two if not for the excellent characterisations of Geordi and Leah Brahms.
The book basically deals with the genesis wave from star trek II and III being enhanced and then unleashed on the Federation after Carol Marcus is abducted.
The actual plot isn't that bad, the wave starts off in the outskirts of the Federation then heads inwards, and after a couple of systems are destroyed, Starfleet responds, realising the wave will eventually threaten Earth as well as a fair chunk of Romulan space.
The writing is fairly solid, I found Picard to be pretty dull in this book, and some of the others were hardly seen or heard, but Crusher did have a nice role, it was good how Vornholt actually had Crusher talking about Wes, we rarely hear Crusher now.
Vornhole really puts some effort into using many of the different races within the Federation, Tellarites, Capellans, Deltans, some of those races are rarely ever seen or heard of.
The part of the book I have a serious problem with is the scale of the destruction. The wave wipes out over thirty million people on the first few planets it wipes out, and Starfleet, Picard in particular, just seem to accept that without any sort of grief or sorrow, while the loss of 10 Enterprise crewmembers is a tremendous tragedy, as if death from genocide is some sort of galactic constant and no more needs to be said on it, completely ridiculous.
I also don't like the format Vornhole has written the book in (or the format the publishers chose, I don't know which). The font change is okay, but at the beginning of each chapter the format is changed, I prefer the old format with the Starfleet symbol.
I also don't like the technical side of the genesis wave, how can a wave be generated from a simple device have enough power to wipe out and recreate an entire planet? But the biggest problem is the travel factor, the wave starts at the edge of the Federation and moves in, and within a week or so is threatening Earth. That's ridiculous, there would have to be a couple of thousand light years distance there, and waves can't travel faster than the speed of light(physics IS constant).
Like I said before, the book isn't a bad read, but it isn't an exceptionally good read either, think twice before buying it.
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