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7 Reviews
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4.0 out of 5 stars Trench warfare, entrenchment of ideology, battlefield heros
Like Necropolis, Dan Abnett introduces us to the society of the host planet where the story takes place. We meet a worn veteran of the planet's decades-long war traveling to the local capitol. Through personal observations and reflections of this character, we learn about the history and mind set of the locals, which we know will play prevalently in the unfolding of the...
Published on April 25 2004 by Noirceuil le Sombre

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3.0 out of 5 stars Gaunts Ghosts, Straight Sliver
Now this book really sucked compared to any other of the Gaunts Ghosts novels. Personally, the every persistant death threats from Cuu haven't driven my favorite character insane-er and done some serious damage to Mr. Abnetts greatest characters (If you read Guns of Tanith you'll understand, If not hop to it.)
Anywho, it was bad, but read it so you can advance the...
Published on April 20 2004 by Pat "Larkin"


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4.0 out of 5 stars Trench warfare, entrenchment of ideology, battlefield heros, April 25 2004
Like Necropolis, Dan Abnett introduces us to the society of the host planet where the story takes place. We meet a worn veteran of the planet's decades-long war traveling to the local capitol. Through personal observations and reflections of this character, we learn about the history and mind set of the locals, which we know will play prevalently in the unfolding of the plot. Once again, the story truly begins once Imperial Forces arrive from orbit. From there it's an ongoing illustration of the entrenchment of military doctrine going against all attempts to evolve, resulting in stalemate upon the battlefield and nearly contributing to the victory of Chaos forces secretly bolstering the strength and tactics of the local enemies. Once again, Dan Abnett weaves a tale composed of numerous individual experiences where human beings overcome or are overwhelmed by adverse circumstances, emerging from the receding tide as heroes (martyred or surviving as the case may be) or tragic examples of human failings. There is little mention or description of Chaos in this story, rather it's solely about individuals and how they deal with the futility of their situations. It is a collective account of perserverence. There is a segment in the story where Gaunt is able to get half of his regiment taken off the brutal front lines and assigned to some "lighter" duty geared more towards their light infantry skills. In his mind, it is a glass half full - to be able to save at least half of his troops from the mindless butchery of the trenches. There are numerous other character-driven episodes in the book that will add to your appreciation of the story. I could go on, but I will complete this review by saying, that no matter what kind of subject matter you prefer in a novel, you will not be disappointed by this.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Gaunts Ghosts, Straight Sliver, April 20 2004
Now this book really sucked compared to any other of the Gaunts Ghosts novels. Personally, the every persistant death threats from Cuu haven't driven my favorite character insane-er and done some serious damage to Mr. Abnetts greatest characters (If you read Guns of Tanith you'll understand, If not hop to it.)
Anywho, it was bad, but read it so you can advance the story-plot, and get ready for a much needed relief of Sabbat Mytr.
Larks.Signing off. (By the way its kinda cool that some of my friends call me Larks. I'm not just writting it down because I think it sounds cool
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4.0 out of 5 stars A lesser book in the series, still a good military sf novel, Jan. 13 2003
This review is from: Straight Silver (Mass Market Paperback)
Hmm, I nearly fell into the trap of comparing this book with the others in the series, which are easily superior to this one. That is not the issue, though, what matters is: how good is THIS book considered on its own? Again, we find the Tanith First embroiled in a conflict in which they are forced to follow asinine orders which do not use their abilities appropriately. In this manner, Abnett subjects them to one of the more antiquated forms of combat, that being trench warfare as in World War I, with chemical weapons in use. While antiquated with respect to their usual mode of combat (something mentioned explicitly several times), it is occurring on a planet for which that is the level of development. Also, they are constrained to follow the orders of the planetery officials in prosecuting the war. More of that hell that is war, it seems.
Little progress is made in advancing the characters from the state they occupied at the end of the previous novel. It seems almost like Abnett hit a length limit and simply stopped the book, making this novel almost a brief transition in the series. There is more mysticism like that used in Honor Guard, which seems basically to foreshadow something in the next book. The really likable characters do well, though as before a lot of them get shot up. There is one REALLY unlikable character who again comes through (in Guns of Tanith he murdered one of the major characters in the regiment), it seems to me, simply to have a villain in the ranks (nevermind that there are already several who hate the commander, Gaunt; I guess we needed someone for the regular ranks to battle).
All in all, this is the weakest book yet in the series. It does serve well, though, in introducing new readers to the present state of the characters and the setting. Given that this is the sixth in the series, perhaps he and the editors felt such a book was called for. The ending is pretty unsatisfying, since, as I mentioned, this book seems to be simply a setup for the next book. The writing, though, is very well done, in terms of describing the atmosphere and emotions of those in the trenches or in the no-man's-land. Mixing conflict, humor, suspense, sacrifice, triumph and tragedy, Abnett still delivers a great read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Straight Fething Silver!, May 11 2003
By 
T. Harris (Chillicothe, IL United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Straight Silver (Mass Market Paperback)
Straight Silver is my favorite book out of the Gaunt's Ghost's series. The book starts off with the Ghost's arriving at a world which as be engulfed in a 40 year tench war, wow. Straight Silver, like all the other Gaunt's ghosts books has wonderful detailed battle scenes, but that is not the reason why this is my favorite. I felt this book had wonderful character development and emotion. Unlike the other books in the series, Straight Silver was the only one almost to bring me to tears. Rawne, Larkin, Caffran, Criid, Soric, Gaunt, and all the ghost seemed to get a upgrade in this book. The writing and descriptions of the characters and the settings were Abnett at his best.
Some fans of the Gaunt's Ghosts don't really like this book, other like myself,absolutey love this book. So give it a try, but read all the other first.
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2.0 out of 5 stars unfortunately this book doesn't hold up, Jan. 2 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Straight Silver (Mass Market Paperback)
I have really enjoyed the Gaunt's Ghosts series so far, and I have thought that Abnett's use of characters and setting has been imaginitive and enjoyable. In Straight Silver however, the plot never seems to draw the reader in, and the end of the book left me very unsatisfied. Also, the trench war setting seems on an exact par with WWI, and as a result, there are numerous inconsistencies with a 41st millenium battlefield. I guess that I only voice my disappointment, because I felt his other books were so good. I would highly reccommend the previous books, but this one is not as good.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Good warhammer 40k book., June 10 2004
I first read this because Im a fan of warhammer. I played chaos so i was looking for a chaos book. my choices were limited so this was the closest I could get. I thought t was going to be a bore at the beginning. But once the fighting started i couldnt put it down. This was my first warhammer book wich is to bad because Dan Abnitt probably writes the limit of enjoyment warhammer 40k books can go. so I was looking forword to the other four I bought but they just couldnt add up. But if you play warhammer 40k then you will probably like this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A fething good read, Jan. 10 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: Straight Silver (Mass Market Paperback)
I've been a fan of Gaunt's Ghosts from the beginning, and every book has left me with a feeling of awe at Mr. Abnett's writing ability. this one is no different in that respect. A damned good book if there ever was one.
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Straight Silver
Straight Silver by Dan Abnett (Mass Market Paperback - Dec 1 2002)
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