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5.0 out of 5 stars The Killing Kind
This is another Charlie Parker. It is one of the first and is very violent and there is a lot of torture in it. I was fascinated and abhored with some of the contents. I was very happy with the ending I will say. John Connolly is a very realistic writer. Again, I wouldn't recommend this for everyone.
Published 18 months ago by Linda J. Leclair

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not very plausible
I'm not sure why this book was nominated for the Bram Stoker award. It's not scary or very horrific at all (with the exception of two or three scenes). The book is solidly written, but the story moves along like a TV movie-of-the-week, from one clue to another -- none of which is very believable. The coincidences and connections seem to easy and unrealistic, as if Mr...
Published on March 27 2004 by William M Miller


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5.0 out of 5 stars Outstanding Thriller, Oct. 4 2002
By 
Konrad Kern (OFallon, MO United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Killing Kind (Hardcover)
See book description above.
Mr. Pudd, a violent and truly evil character, is just one of the memorable things about this outstanding thriller. A very well written novel that's vivid and intense, including some very graphic storytelling. John Connolly is indeed an author that goes to the top of my list. Nice Job.
Inside the cover: "This is a honeycomb world, each hollow linked to the next, each life inextricably intertwined with the lives of others. The loss of even one reverberates through the whole, altering the balance, changing the nature of existence in tiny, imperceptible ways."
Highly recommended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!!!, Sept. 27 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Killing Kind (Hardcover)
This is an excellent mystery novel. Connelly keeps getting better and better with each book. His writing is reminiscent of James Lee Burke insofar as his poetic writing style and the reader's identification with the main character, who is complex and has many problems but is still extremely likeable. This book has nonstop action with many twists, and just might be the best novel I have read all year. I didn't want the book to end! Great writing and a fantastic plot--watch out, Jeffery Deaver!
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5.0 out of 5 stars Best thriller you'll read this year, Sept. 23 2002
This review is from: The Killing Kind (Hardcover)
This is another amazing book by John Connolly. He builds on the characters once more, again revealing greater depth to Bird Parker's character. He gives us slightly more insight into Angel and Louis and because of the darkness of this book, the scenes in which they appear serve as some great relief.
Connolly's writing is sheer beauty. His manner of description evokes, with seeming ease, any atmosphere he wishes to create. His prose is lyrical, and his descriptions may stop you in your tracks just for a second while you roll them over in your mind, picturing the image perfectly.
In this novel, Connolly has created a wonderful plot, which seethes with an omnipresent, and almost omnipotent, evil and darkness. Also, he give us two of the best villains fiction has ever produced. Mr Pudd, the enforcer of a shady organisation known as "The Fellowship" who is violent, scary, completely without a drop of humanity, and The Reverend Aaron Faulkner, an egotistical religious maniac, head of a group known as the Aroostook Baptists. Faulkner is a completely venemous characters who just oozes poison from every action. Over the course of the novel, Parker, Angel and Louis, will come into contact with both these men, and this contact will try to drag them down into the depths of an equal hell.
The plot is much less complicated than his debut, Every Dead thing, and the entire novel is much more refined and focused, which adds immense power to the book. It's completely chilling and very scary (an effect aided by the way Connolly likes to blend in subtle elements of the supernatural in with his books) and, almost certainly, the best thriller that will be published in the US this year.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Not for the faint of heart, Sept. 8 2002
This review is from: The Killing Kind (Hardcover)
Charlie Parker is back, on the trail of evil-doers once again; seeing dead people and seeking to avenge their deaths. In The Killing Kind Charlie is asked to look into the death of Grace Peltier and off we go on a dark, spooky ride. As always Connolly writes with great ease, creating villains of unsurpassed creepiness and describing horrific deaths of a vast variety. The horror is eased by the startling bits of humor that pop up when they're most needed--the sure signature of an author who knows that the material needs breaths of fresh air at regular intervals.
The book gallops along, in Connolly's always trim narrative style, with enough heart-stopping moments to warrant having a cardiologist on stand-by while you read--particularly if you pick up this book at night. There is much to be admired in this author's writing: a fine gift for characterization, clean tight prose, and a sense of timing that would do any musician proud.
Most highly recommended, but with a caution. If you're at all bug-phobic, stay well away from The Killing Kind
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5.0 out of 5 stars A very suspensful and creepy thriller., Sept. 6 2002
This review is from: The Killing Kind (Hardcover)
Charlie Parker, having faced much tragedy in his life-the suicide of his father, the murder of his wife and daughter, and the hunt for their killer-has been trying to live a tranquil life until he is called upon to investigate the death of Grace Peltier, a young woman whose untimely death sparks many questions.
Grace's death is ruled a suicide, but her father believes it to be murder so he enlists the help of Charlie to find out what happened, and when a mass grave is discovered Charlie realizes the two seemingly un-related are connected and they lead to a religious group known as the Aroostook Baptists.
The further Charlie digs to uncover the secrets surrounding the religious order he is put at odds with the group's leader, while being tormented by a killer known as 'Mr. Pudd', forcing him to fight for his friends, his lover, and his life.
'The Killing Kind' is another great novel in the Charlie Parker series. The pacing is fast, the plot gripping, and the writing is lyrical and intense. Once begun this novel can't be put down, leaving readers anxious for the next book featuring Charlie Parker.
John Connolly has a gritty, dark, gothic writing style, one that mesmerizes readers with it's exploration of the dark sides of human nature. Expertly blending creepy thrills, fascinating characters, and un-thinkable violence, suspense readers will be hard pressed to find a better novel of this kind.
Nick Gonnella
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5.0 out of 5 stars THIS UNBELIEVABLE SERIES KEEPS GETTING BETTER AND BETTER!!!, Aug. 22 2002
By 
Wayne C. Rogers (Las Vegas, Nevada United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Killing Kind (Hardcover)
Since I read John Connolly's first novel, EVERY DEAD THING, I've quickly become an avid fan of his. His second book, DARK HOLLOW, confirmed my belief that here was a gifted writer who deserves a much larger "fan" base than he currently has in the United States. Now, having read his third novel in the "Charlie 'Bird' Parker" series, I know that this is an author who's on his way to the "bestseller" lists. He's simply that good! Mr. Connolly knows how to create in-depth characters that stand out, weave intricate plots and subplots that keep the reader guessing, and has a style of prose that is almost poetic in its sheer elegance. In THE KILLING KIND, Charlie Parker returns to investigate the death of a young college student, Grace Peltier, and her connection to a religious organization in Maine known as the Fellowship. It seems that she was writing a thesis on small group of religious zealots, the Aroostook Baptists, and their mysterious disappearance in the year of 1963. Her search for information eventually led her to the Fellowship and its founder, Carter Paragon. Shortly there after, she was found in her car alongside a dirt road with a revolver in her hand, a bullet in her head, and a Bible at her side. Grace's father, Curtis Peltier, doesn't believe that his daughter committed suicide, and he wants our New England P.I. to find the killer. As Charlie begins his investigation, however, a mass grave containing the skeletal remains of the Aroostook Baptists is accidentally discovered along a riverbank in northern Maine, and this also seems to be somehow tied in with the Fellowship and Carter Paragon. When Charlie starts to probe a little too deeply into the workings of this supposedly religious organization, Mr. Pudd (a man who is the very essence of evil and loves to kill his victims with deadly spiders) and his mute, female assistant are sent to warn him off the case. Since Charlie has never been one to heed the warnings of other people, he continues to plow ahead and soon people start dropping dead around him. Even when Louis and Angel arrive to offer their help, they prove to be barely a match for our illusive Mr. Pudd, and come to know the true meaning of terror on a first-hand basis. No one will ever be the same again once the evil Mr. Pudd gets his hands on them. THE KILLING KIND carries the writings of John Connolly to a much higher level of expertise than his earlier two novels. Like the first two, it has several plot lines coming from different directions that join together into a smoothly written, utterly satisfying ending. Both the familiar and new characters in the book ring true to the ear, especially the terrifying Mr. Pudd and the Jewish assassin known only as the Golem. Mr. Connolly has a remarkable skill in being able to create killers that stand out in ways other authors can only dream about. That's one of the things that make this series so much fun to read. Another aspect is the main character of Charlie Parker. This is a unique individual trying to make amends for the life he's lived by righting the wrongs done to other people. It also helps that he has friends like Louis and Angel who aren't afraid of doing a little killing, if the situation calls for it. As the series continues to develop, Charlie and the love of his life, Rachel, are drawn closer and closer to each other, and there's a wonderful surprise on the last page of this novel that makes me extremely eager to read the next one when it comes out. What makes this book stand out from EVERY DEAD THING and DARK HOLLOW is the sheer craftsmanship that Mr. Connolly displays as a writer. It's evident that he's now much more comfortable with his characters, plus I love reading his prose out loud. His sentences are written with skill of a poet, and the magic and power of his words continously transport me to a different world that's often difficult to leave. All in all, the three novels in the "Charlie Parker" series are great reads in every sense of the word that leave you starving for more from this extremely gifted author. John Connolly is definitely a writer on his way to stardom!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not very plausible, March 27 2004
By 
William M Miller (Bronxville, NY USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Killing Kind: A Thriller (Mass Market Paperback)
I'm not sure why this book was nominated for the Bram Stoker award. It's not scary or very horrific at all (with the exception of two or three scenes). The book is solidly written, but the story moves along like a TV movie-of-the-week, from one clue to another -- none of which is very believable. The coincidences and connections seem to easy and unrealistic, as if Mr. Connolly is struggling to connect the pieces of the story together. The story does moves rather quickly, but seems to be bogged down by various sub-plots that take our chararacter off in different directions. It's funny that one of Charlie Parker's first leads was the witness Marcy Becker, but conveniently Charlie doesn't get around to looking for her until the end. The book would have been 100 pages long if he had. I also had a problem with the amount of cliches during many of the action /danger scenes. With the exception of the very enjoyable opening involving Alison Beck, I've seen everything in this book before. A much better thriller writer is author Kevin O'Brien. With books like "Make Them Cry" and "Watch Them Die", he leaves John Connolly in the dust.
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The Killing Kind: A Thriller
The Killing Kind: A Thriller by John Connolly (Mass Market Paperback - March 1 2003)
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