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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An absolutely riveting, unparalleled success
It is quite hard to believe just how good Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is; the first three books, all of which impressed me deeply, seem almost forgettable compared to this intense fourth entry in the series. This is as rich a reading experience as you will find, no matter what your age. The storyline as it exists at the end of this mammoth epic has more of a hold...
Published on June 21 2006 by Daniel Jolley

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3.0 out of 5 stars Inconsistent and morally subversive
Rowling has never been a champion of having characters play by the rules, but in Goblet of Fire, she goes even further. The main plot revolves around the TriWizard tournament, a wizardly contest between the champions of various schools. Harry does not solve one single element of the tournament without either cheating or having some cheat on his behalf - including...
Published on Jan. 7 2002 by Chad M. Brick


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An absolutely riveting, unparalleled success, June 21 2006
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
It is quite hard to believe just how good Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is; the first three books, all of which impressed me deeply, seem almost forgettable compared to this intense fourth entry in the series. This is as rich a reading experience as you will find, no matter what your age. The storyline as it exists at the end of this mammoth epic has more of a hold on me now, as an adult, than the Star Wars saga had on me as a kid, which is saying a great deal, I assure you. One barely knows where to start one's praises of this book; yes, it does have both dark overtones and undertones to it, yet it also boasts some of the funniest moments of the series. We learn a great deal more about the major characters and turn our attention to new attractions such as the unique new Defense Against the Dark Arts professor, Mad-Eye Moody. Events in magical circles outside of Hogwarts increase the landscape of Rowling's magical world many times over as we are given insight into the workings of the Ministry of Magic, are treated to the best seat in the house at the Quidditch World Cup championship, and are introduced to two wholly new magical schools in foreign locations. The pattern one might have come to expect of Harry's fourth year at Hogwarts is thrown immediately out of the window; there are no school Quidditch matches this year, nor is there even an inter-house cup competition. Instead, Professor Dumbledore makes the extraordinary announcement that the Triwizard Tournament has not only been reinstituted after many years, it will take place at Hogwarts. Only sixth- and seventh-year students are eligible to compete, seeming to leave Harry Potter quite out of the mix, which is fine by him. A Goblet of Fire decides which of the volunteers from each school will compete as its Champion, but this quite impartial judge surprises everyone by selecting a certain familiar, fourth year student for the competition. What follows is a roller coaster ride of a year, with Harry enduring more trials and troubles than ever before: his friendship with Ron threatens to end forever, he faces incredibly difficult tasks that may or may not serve as a means by which someone can kill him, a thoroughly sleazy tabloid reporter makes his and his friends' lives all but unbearable on a number of occasions, and he faces perhaps his biggest challenge of all: having to ask a girl to accompany him to the Yule Ball. Oh, a certain arch enemy also rears his ugly head once again.

This is a large book, obviously; it gets off to something of a slow start, taking 171 pages just to get Harry to Hogwarts to start the new year. Have no fear, though, because the novel then sucks you in so deeply that you may be unable to get out of it, should you even want to. The length of the book quickly becomes a comfort to you, as you will not want this book to ever end. End it shall, however, with an incredibly intense final 125 pages that will leave you gasping for breath, roiling in shock, and surging with adrenaline. Anyone unable to understand why untold millions of addicted fans have been climbing the walls for three years waiting for Book 5 have simply not read this book. Events of quite drastic proportions have been set in motion now, and the end of Harry's fourth year at Hogwarts holds little resolution to it. There are dark days ahead and a significant number of plot points appear on the horizon. Harry, Hermione, and Ron are growing up, with normal teenaged issues already beginning to manifest themselves, Hogwarts is in something of a tizzy over the culminating events of the completed school year, and the whole world of magic shows every sign of being in utter disarray. The world of Harry Potter has never been more intense, exciting, and portentous as it is at the end of this unbelievably good book.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars By Far, the Best Book I've ever read!, Feb. 2 2003
Harry gets himself into yet more trouble as his name is drawn to compete against other schools of witchcraft and wizardry as a Hogwarts school Champion. He wishes he were just spectating the tournament, but someone put his name in the Goblet of Fire to get him in trouble! Strange things start happening, but Harry gets help from the new Defense Against the Arts Teacher Mad Eye Moody. Harry has taken a liking to Moody until he realizes the awful truth. In the fourth and final task of the tournament, Harry finds himself tied with Cedric Diggory, the only Seeker ever to beat Harry. He encounters Voldemort where Diggory is killed by the UNFORGIVABLE CURSE Avada Kedavra. Harry meets his parents and Voldemort takes away his only protection given to him by his mother that lead to the temporary downfall of the Dark Lord!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A very famous book, March 6 2006
By 
L.N. (Vancouver) - See all my reviews
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

The author of this series is J.K. Rowling, a very famous women author. Rowling wrote the beginning of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone on some pieces of scrap paper at a local café. She now lives in Edinburgh with her daughter. The book Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the kind of book that's full of magic and power .If you've read the first, second, and third book of the series, then you probably will want to read the fourth book There are six books in the series. Order goes like this: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, and the latest one that just came out, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.
I'll talk a bit about the main characters in this book. The main characters are Harry, Hermione and Ronald (Ron). Harry is very brave and daring because of the competitions. Hermione is very smart and always puts up her hand in class. Ron is terrified of spiders (like me) and he's not too good at doing spells, but he is still a good student. All three of them are good students.

My favourite part of the fourth book is when Dumbledore picks out the contestants of the Triwizard Tournament (a very famous wizard competition) from the Goblet of Fire because everyone was excited about who was going to compete in the dangerous competitions. Unfortunately, Harry was too young to compete, but mysteriously, someone put his name in the Goblet of Fire and it got picked out so he has to compete, too! Not everyone was too pleased about the news that there were going to be two Hogwarts competitors, but Dumbledore said that whoever's name comes out of the Goblet must compete .I really like this part because everyone feels excited and tense about who's name will be picked out from the Goblet of Fire ( including me!)
Now, I'll talk a bit about the spells that are used in the series. There are three Unforgivable Curses. If you use those on other people, you will be given a life sentence in Azkaban, the wizard prison. One is the Imperius Curse. If someone uses it on you, the result is that they will have control over you. They can tell you to lie, jump out the window, or even commit suicide! Another one is the Cruciatus Curse. If you get hit by that spell, you will suffer such pain that it'll make you scream! The last and worst illegal curse is the killing curse, Avada Kedavra. If you get hit by that spell, you will die immediately without a mark anywhere on your body! I really like this explanation from one of the professors who explained about the spells because he explained it in very good detail about how serious it is if someone gets caught doing it or if you got hit by it. Very dangerous!!
When the author, J.K. Rowling, is talking about how Harry is concentrating to try and get the golden egg from the dragon, the author is actually trying to tell the reader that if you concentrate enough to do something, you will succeed in doing so if you keep on believing that you can do it. I think she is trying to say that because Harry knew that everyone is looking at him and he's famous so he knew he can't fail or else everyone will laugh at him.
I'll say that the Harry Potter series will be for anyone above 8 years of age in case there are words that the reader doesn't know the meaning of. The Harry Potter books have some pretty complicated words in them. If you read some of the Harry Potter books, then you should watch the movies. They're just as good, except it's more realistic. I hope that someday you will get to read the whole Harry Potter series. I give the Harry Potter books the ranking of 5 stars out of 5. I give it that ranking because that's my favourite series that I've ever read. My brother, Andy, first got the idea of the Harry Potter series from a friend of his. Andy read first, then I read next, and then my little sister, Sunny, read the series. Andy decided to see which Harry Potter movies came out yet.
I think the Harry Potter stories are very adventurous, magical, and exciting. I think it's very adventurous because have you ever seen anyone fly on a broomstick in real life? No, right? So that's what makes so adventurous, no one in real life has ever done it before. It's definitely very magical because of all the spells the story contains. It's so exciting because will Harry succeed in completing the competitions? Well, that's for you to find out! You will stay up late to finish the whole entire series (if you have the books)!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A very famous book, March 6 2006
By 
L.N. (Vancouver) - See all my reviews
Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

The author of this series is J.K. Rowling, a very famous women author. Rowling wrote the beginning of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone on some pieces of scrap paper at a local café. She now lives in Edinburgh with her daughter. The book Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the kind of book that's full of magic and power .If you've read the first, second, and third book of the series, then you probably will want to read the fourth book There are six books in the series. Order goes like this: Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, and the latest one that just came out, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.
I'll talk a bit about the main characters in this book. The main characters are Harry, Hermione and Ronald (Ron). Harry is very brave and daring because of the competitions. Hermione is very smart and always puts up her hand in class. Ron is terrified of spiders (like me) and he's not too good at doing spells, but he is still a good student. All three of them are good students.

My favourite part of the fourth book is when Dumbledore picks out the contestants of the Triwizard Tournament (a very famous wizard competition) from the Goblet of Fire because everyone was excited about who was going to compete in the dangerous competitions. Unfortunately, Harry was too young to compete, but mysteriously, someone put his name in the Goblet of Fire and it got picked out so he has to compete, too! Not everyone was too pleased about the news that there were going to be two Hogwarts competitors, but Dumbledore said that whoever's name comes out of the Goblet must compete .I really like this part because everyone feels excited and tense about who's name will be picked out from the Goblet of Fire ( including me!)
Now, I'll talk a bit about the spells that are used in the series. There are three Unforgivable Curses. If you use those on other people, you will be given a life sentence in Azkaban, the wizard prison. One is the Imperius Curse. If someone uses it on you, the result is that they will have control over you. They can tell you to lie, jump out the window, or even commit suicide! Another one is the Cruciatus Curse. If you get hit by that spell, you will suffer such pain that it'll make you scream! The last and worst illegal curse is the killing curse, Avada Kedavra. If you get hit by that spell, you will die immediately without a mark anywhere on your body! I really like this explanation from one of the professors who explained about the spells because he explained it in very good detail about how serious it is if someone gets caught doing it or if you got hit by it. Very dangerous!!
When the author, J.K. Rowling, is talking about how Harry is concentrating to try and get the golden egg from the dragon, the author is actually trying to tell the reader that if you concentrate enough to do something, you will succeed in doing so if you keep on believing that you can do it. I think she is trying to say that because Harry knew that everyone is looking at him and he's famous so he knew he can't fail or else everyone will laugh at him.
I'll say that the Harry Potter series will be for anyone above 8 years of age in case there are words that the reader doesn't know the meaning of. The Harry Potter books have some pretty complicated words in them. If you read some of the Harry Potter books, then you should watch the movies. They're just as good, except it's more realistic. I hope that someday you will get to read the whole Harry Potter series. I give the Harry Potter books the ranking of 5 stars out of 5. I give it that ranking because that's my favourite series that I've ever read. My brother, Andy, first got the idea of the Harry Potter series from a friend of his. Andy read first, then I read next, and then my little sister, Sunny, read the series. Andy decided to see which Harry Potter movies came out yet.
I think the Harry Potter stories are very adventurous, magical, and exciting. I think it's very adventurous because have you ever seen anyone fly on a broomstick in real life? No, right? So that's what makes so adventurous, no one in real life has ever done it before. It's definitely very magical because of all the spells the story contains. It's so exciting because will Harry succeed in completing the competitions? Well, that's for you to find out! You will stay up late to finish the whole entire series (if you have the books)!
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2.0 out of 5 stars In favour of Harry, Aug. 18 2003
By 
Michael JR Jose (the UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
It is odd how a chance comment on a radio talk show can spark off a train of thought one had long since parked in a siding. So my interest in HP revived when I heard in discussion of children's books the old saw that, " 'Grimm's Fairy Tales' are for children, but some of them are too scary for children" (and, ergo, best avoided, thus leaving no-one to read them). But Harry's adventures are very obviously a modern day fairy tale, seemingly, he did not belong in this Grimm category. This is a curious blindspot, and I did wonder what lay under this attitude. Personally, I hope in due course J.K. Rowling will receive a well-deserved official honour from the government for services to the UK Exchequer (is being made a 'Dame' is equivalent to a 'Sir'?), and she has my warm praise for boosting childhood reading habits, but the literary questions are something else.
In Grimm most of the stories really strike home. They deliver justice and come-uppance to bullies, snobs, liars, the greedy, and the self-obsessed. They bestow good endings on the good--rather like Potter's tales. The few dull tales amongst them are either disjointed or too slight, they leave you asking, 'And your point is?'--rather like Potter's tales. So the discerning parent, if worried about the few scary stories in Grimm, will merely avoid reading those few out to the child who is too young for them (Grimm's tales are meant to be spoken, as they are a written record of oral tales, whereas HP is silent reading). And if the child is old enough and bold enough to seek out and read Grimm's Tales independently, then they probably are old enough! But does this tell us what the real 'value system' difference is between the worlds of Grimm and Harry?
Harry gets into some murky matters in this book. As promised, the Dark Mark (see chap.9), rises a little stronger as each book is enconjured (q.v., 'learn a Summoning Charm', p.149). However, there is the properly natural magic of 'a hundred Veela...gliding out onto the pitch', casting their near-irresistible cheerleading spell of loveliness on the guys. Then there is that wickedly accurate parody of British journalism, Rita Skeeter of the 'Daily Prophet' (they do like to think they foretell as opposed to just tell), with a Coleopteran sting in the tail. But in fact the overall effect of Voldemort and Co. on the tone of the story is much more maleficent than anything in the venerable Grimm. Even a minor character like Peeves the poltergeist tends to out-grim the traditional tales. ('Peeves the poltergeist, a little man in a bell-covered hat and orange bow-tie, his wide, malicious face contorted with concentration took aim again...Peeves stuck out his tongue...cackling insanely' (p.152-3)). So the wise parent may want to know what it is that really drives these adventures.
It is no plot spoiler, as everyone knows by now, to say that there is a death in this book (and it was extensively trailed before release), and of course Grimm's tales, the daily news on TV, and everyday life contain deaths too. The issue is how you handle it in the literature or chosen medium. The death in the Goblet of Fire does not really matter, it is a bit like terminating a crash test dummy. Paradoxically this is the worrying thing: there is no real tragedy in it. We are not made to care about this character before this book in the series came out, and we do not build up any feeling for or against the character during the book. This is the key flaw. We are meant to care about 'the good': the fact that they do not have a good ending is the essence of tragedy. But in this book the Dark is more real, more dynamic, and more exciting than the Good. In fact, the 'good' in this book really tend to mere neutrality, a secular silhouette of goodness. It explains why the magic is so trumpery. Grimm's tales are of course shot through with a real spiritual strength and life (with many a miracle, but no churches, vicars, bibles, or angels), essentially being of medieval European Christian stock. Had I space we could consider the same way that 'Arabian Nights' are from Islamic stock of AD800. So it is the empowering and guiding worldview that is the real difference between Grimm's tales and Potter's, and it is the underlying reason why some would tend to neglect them in favour of Harry. The preference is probably instinctive as much as conscious. But we must ask ourselves what the real test is, which will endure, which will succeed in the long run--bearing in mind Grimm's headstart, which, being long earned, we cannot discount?
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5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome, June 19 2003
According to me this book , HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE is the best in Harry Potter series(first 4 books) . In the part 'Flesh , Blood and Bone' and 'The Death Eaters' , you will get a shock which will be more powerful than any you had received in any of the books . This is nothing else but the return of the Dark Lord - VOLDERMORT .I love the part 'The Death Eaters'.
Rowling deserves a great round of applause for the climax of the story . She ends it in such a way that you will keep waiting for the 5th book .What will keep u waiting is ur interest to know how will magical world change with the return of Lord Voldermort .
If u have read this one , book ur next one because its going to be real fun .One minute past midnight ,on 21st June 2003 , when HARRY POTTER and the ORDER OF THE PHOENIX goes onsale , there will Potter Parties all over the world with bottles of butterbeer , chocolate frogs and bertie bott's every flavourbeens . Children will ask their parents to let them sleep in the cupboard under the stairs with their pyjamas on .
I have just one thing to say , if you haven't read THE HARRY POTTER SERIES , you ARE missing something .
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5.0 out of 5 stars It depends on your personal taste of course..., June 18 2003
By 
A reader (over the rainbow) - See all my reviews
...but I can't see how you can't like this. It's not bad...
The story is about a normal boy with glasses, green eyes, prblems that are both normal and unusual, and a scar...As Harry grows older, so are the readers expected to. It is no longer only read by children (as if it ever was), but can also be apreciated by teens, as the caracters are now 14.
In the earlier books, some of the action was about succeeding in breaking rools. It appears to be considered cool, doing so at Hogwarts
- although I can only see Fred and George thinking so, really. People are sometimes mad that Harry & Co have no respect for authority figures.
This is an important issue. The thing is, seeing it through kids eyes here, the only authoroty person who repects them in return is the headmaster.
Professor McGonnagal doesn't believe them about the stone in the first book. I suppose it's understandable, but so is The gang's lack of trust in adults.
How can you respect people like Snape? Or Filch? Or the defense against the dark arts teacher, who changes from book to book. There is only one time so far that the teacher has been a good one, but he turned out to be a werewolf.
The wizard world is also afflicted with a corrupt ministry. And look at Harry's past! No doubt, he is mad at the people who put him with those awful relatives. These books weren't written to teach children not to listen to adults. They are not trying to teach anybody anything, they are trying to tell a story...The series grow darker for each book. Book one is lighthearted, only letting darker parts hint a bit here and there. Book two is a bit worse, and the final chapters are more intense. Book three uncovers the truth of his parents past friends, and he finds out how Harry's parents really died. The ending is not as happy as it should be.
And this thing I was supposed to review, the fourth book...What we thought would never happen, it happens here. First, J. K leads us readers into a false sense of security, of thinking this is just an unusually exiting childrens series. And then she strikes us with this book, containing: A student death (he was in the way), the dark lords return, a satanic rite and some nice bit of torturing...Lots of darkness is introduced in this book, hence it's size. Parents should be warned.
As other reviewers thinking it's poisoning our christian minds, we're not all christians. Yes, the story involves magic. And let's face it. This is Fantasy...If there's magic, usually there are certain elements of dark magic...She sort of made sure no-one believed Harry at the end, remember?
And yes, S.P.E.W also had it's reasons. It made us find out Dobby worked there. After the fiends reunited, Dobby gave Harry socks for chrismas. Professor Moody saw those socks. Dobby was able to help Harry whith the second task after that, and the meeting with the house elves also re-introduced Winky. So, yes, it did help proceed the plot.
I agree that it was a bit obvious that Harry was to be picked a champion, but a good writer can get away with almost anything. Rowling writes it masterfully in my opinion, adding bad effects to go with it, such as the whole fight with Ron...Put all predudice about these books aside, and enjoy them. That's mainly what I am trying to say to you here.
I mean, Come on! They are popular for a reason, after all...
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Saga Changes. . ., June 18 2003
"Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire" is my favorite "Harry Potter" book out of the first four parts of the saga. It also is the longest of the first four parts.
Part Four begins with the chilling chapter "The Riddle House," which is not told from Harry's point of view, but from a Muggle's-- Frank Bryce. In this first chapter we find out that Voldermort, although not returned to full power, is not as helpless as he was in the "Sorcerer's Stone." He needs one thing to return to full power. He needs Harry Potter. . .
After "The Riddle House" the attention shifts back to Harry, and all that happened in the first chapter seems to have nothing to do with what's going on-- Harry is going to the Quidditch World Cup. But the subject of Voldermort is brought back into center focus when his mark is fired into the sky. . .
This book follows many storylines: The storyline of Harry being a champion in the Triwizard Tourtament, a tourtament that tests magical skills, against his will. The storyline of Rita Skeeter, the annoying reporter, and her secret. The storyline of Hagrid and his secret. But of course, the main plotline that approaches ever so slowly-- Voldermort's main attempt to get at Harry, and this time he doesn't just want to kill him. . .
In the end, Harry and everyone around him is faced with an approaching war between the light side and the dark side, and they are all, as Dumbuldore says, faced to choose between: "What is right, and what is easy." They are all faced with the challenges of trust and friendship between them all, and if they don't trust eachother, there's no way they'll survive what's to come. A war is coming, and the mysteries of the saga are coming to their peak. After you're done with this fourth installment, read "Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix," to find out what happens next.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Every positive word in the world describes this book., June 13 2003
This book was AMAZING!!! It leaves you with a bit of a cliffhanger, so you can't wait for Book 5. Speaking of which, I will leave you with a few Book 5 excerpts:
Harry's bewilderment deepened with every step he took. What on earth were they doing in a house that looked like it belonged to the darkest of the wizards?
"Mrs. Weasley, what--?"
"Ron and Hermione will explain everything dear, I've really got to dash!" Mrs. Weasley whispered distractedly.
"There!", they had reached the second landing. "You're the door on the right, I'll call you when it's over," and she hurried downstairs again.
Harry crossed the dingy landing, turned the bedroom doorknob which was shaped like a serpent's head, and opened the door. He caught a brief glimpse of a gloomy, high ceilinged, twin-bedded room; then there was a loud twittering noise, followed by an even louder shriek and his vision was completely obscured by a large quantity of very bushy hair.
Hermione had thrown herself around onto him in a hug that nearly knocked him flat, while Ron's tiny owl, Pigwidgeon zoomed excitedly round and round their heads.
"Harry! Ron! He's here! Harry's here! We didn't hear you arrive! Oh, how are you? Are you all right? Have you been furious with us? I bet you have. I know our letters were useless, but we couldn't tell you anything. Dumbledore made us swear we wouldn't. Oh, we've got so much to tell you, and you've got to tell us, the Dementors! When we heard -- and that Ministry hearing, it's just outrageous! I've looked it all up! They can't expel you! They just can't! There's provision in the Decree for the Restriction of the Underage Sorcery for the use of magic in life threatening situations.
"Let him breath, Hermione!" said Ron, grinning, closing the door behind Harry. He seemed to have grown several more inches during their month apart, making him taller and more gangly looking than ever, though the long nose, bright red hair, and freckles were the same.
This was realeased on Amazon.com
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5.0 out of 5 stars J.K. Rowling Does It Again!, June 13 2003
By A Customer
Everyone who has been living on planet earth for at least five years knows who Harry Potter is. Regardless of whether or not they have read the books, Harry Potter is, to everyone, very familiar. Most of the world has been waiting eagerly for each book to arrive. The fourth book, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, is the best yet (that said, the fifth book has not been released yet).
J.K. Rowling creates marvelous characters. I was thrilled to learn more about old favorites, and equally thrilled to read about the escapades of the new characters, such as the ridiculous Ludo Bagman, the severe Mr. Crouch, the pitiable Winky, and of course the notorious Rita Skeeter. In this book, we learn more of Harry and Ron's characters, as their friendship is put to the test through the Dark Lord's conniving schemes. The foundations for several romances are laid down in this book.
This book is, like all of Ms. Rowling's previous books, marvelous. Its events scintillate across the page. When I finished the book (in one sitting...okay, I was on an airplane) I cried knowing it would be a few years before I could read another one.
This book is also scarier than the other Harry Potter books - young readers beware. However, a few possible nightmares are more than worth reading it. Enjoy this tour de force!
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Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire Adult Paperback
Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire Adult Paperback by JK Rowling (Paperback - Jan. 12 2011)
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