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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing
This is the first book I've read by Mr. Connelly and I found it to be a great read. Jack McEvoy is a crime reporter whose twin brother, a homicide investigator, is brutally murdered. Although the police rule the death a suicide, Jack is unable to accept this and begins his own investigation. This leads to the discovery of similar murders involving other homicide...
Published on July 14 2004 by business-owner

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3.0 out of 5 stars Poe Lives On Evermore
Police officers are committing suicide all over the country. Cops who could never quite solve the murder cases they were on. Strange quotes left by each of the men, lines taken from the famous poems of Edgar Allan Poe. Sound thrilling? Read on.
Edgar Allan Poe was the master of mystery and the macabre. Now there could be a killer on the loose using call signs...
Published on June 7 2004 by D. A. Shuell


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intriguing, July 14 2004
This review is from: The Poet (Mass Market Paperback)
This is the first book I've read by Mr. Connelly and I found it to be a great read. Jack McEvoy is a crime reporter whose twin brother, a homicide investigator, is brutally murdered. Although the police rule the death a suicide, Jack is unable to accept this and begins his own investigation. This leads to the discovery of similar murders involving other homicide investigators across America, and the FBI becomes involved. Jack is allowed to be part of the investigation and becomes involved with Rachel Walling, an agent with the FBI.
This mystery is full of twists and turns and is a fascinating read. The characters are great, the investigation intriguing, and the real Poet a surprise.
Call me a fan.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars EXCELENT TO-CATCH-A-SERIAL-KILLER NOVEL, Sept. 6 2007
By 
NeuroSplicer (Freeside, in geosynchronous orbit) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (HALL OF FAME)   
This review is from: The Poet (Mass Market Paperback)
I remember reading this book in 12 hours. Straight. I just could not put it down. Made the mistake of starting it in the afternoon. It was daylight when I finished.

People (and back-covers) often claim the terms "page-turner" and "will not be able to put it down" and then we have to plow through verbalistic word-stuffing for weeks, succumbing to sleep after only a few pages.

THE POET is tight, precise, imaginative, smart and very well researched.

It defined Michael Connelly and, justifiably, made his career.

You will enjoy it too.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars OMG !!, July 11 2004
By 
Amazon Customer "Zenomia" (Clinton, IA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Poet (Mass Market Paperback)
I had purchased this book mainly due to the reviews that I had been reading. (Note: I do not normally read murder/mystery genra...I tend to lean towards historical and occult fiction, yet as a book fanatic, I try not to limit myself ;)
"The Poet" is the first I have read by M. Connelly, and I have to say of all the books that I have read, this one scared the bejeasus out of me!! I proudly would have stated that I can't be frightened by a book, I had read it all, there wasn't a hack and slash or horror out there I would have been surprised by...until now.
The story is centered around a reporter, Jack McEnvoy. It begins with Jack's need to question the motives surrounding his brothers suicide. In a reporters need to uncover the 'reason' for things happening, Jack finds odd clues that soon lead him to understand that his brother, (a Denver Homicide Detective), was really murdered and his death can be linked with the deaths of other homicide detectives around the country. (It is never that simple in fiction though is it?:) In each death, the detective was working on a high profile case involving the murder of a person/child who was killed in horribly brutal and violent ways, each case lead the investigators to a brick wall. Soon Jack realizes that there may be TWO serial killers out there working together, how could one guy do all this? He scrambles on a journey to 'catch a killer..' and find the answers that have been unanswered surrounding his brother's death.
The story catches your interest, keeps it hanging and blows you from one theory to the next. Just when you think you know the answer to 'who done it', he blows your theory out of the water. His writing is such that you don't get the heads up of what is going on much before the lead character, Jack, does. I found the dialog a bit stilted at times, but overall the book read more like a movie playing out than it did an actual novel.
The reason I had to give 5 stars was the scare factor. Although most of what I tend to read would creep the jadded readers out, MC writes about a horror that could be lurking in your town, right now. Reality, and the perception of the deviant minds of our fellow human beings was portrayed so well, that I was afriad to read the next page, but couldn't force myself to stop. When Steven King prefaced in the intro about 'sleeping with the lights on', he wasn't blowing smoke!! This book creeps you out in a way that no witch, demon, or blood ceremony can!! It makes you think that the guy you ran into at the grocery store or your English Professor could be "him....like that..". It makes you want the ability to read your fellow human minds just to be sure there isn't some kind of disturbed mind lurking in there just waiting to get out to butcher and slaughter you!
Sure that sounds a bit fanciful and a dramatic raving of a book, but as I said, I don't read this genra often. I think I will now though. Nothing says 'I am a 34 yr. old sleeping with the lights on' like a novel about the scariest monster/demon of all....the human!!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Poet, May 4 2004
By 
jeffdunbar (Wichita Kansas USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Poet (Mass Market Paperback)
TITLE: The Poet
AUTHOR: Michael Connelly
PUBLISHER: Hieronymous, Inc.
PAGES: 501
PRICE (paperback): $7.99
PUBLICATION DATE: 7/1996
ISBN: 0-446-60261-2
CATEGORY: Fiction
"Death is my beat." Those are the words used by our narrator Jack McEvoy, a reporter for the Rocky Mountain News. At the beginning Jack finds out his brother a Denver Homicide cop, has just commited suicide. The death of his brother thrusts Jack to begin writing a story over cops and suicide, but during the investigation he starts finding pieces that just dont fit together. Jack has to travel to differnt states so he can piece the puzzle together. First he has to convince the cops to reopen his brothers case. To do this he described the message that had been left by his brother. "Out of space Out of time."
The killer uses a script from an Edger Allen Poe poem, on each of his victims. Each of the homicide cops killed were working on a case, that could not be solved. Because of this and other important evidence Jack was able to convince the cops to reopen the case.
Upon the reopening of the cases, Jack was able to travel to different states in hopes to piece it together. Along the way he is able to convince other law agencies to reopen their cases involving police officers suicides. During his travels Jack runs into Michael Warren an "ex reporter" working at the Law Enforcement Foundation who appears to be very helpful in giving him important files that jack was earlier denied. His journey also took him to the F.B.I'.s Behavioral Science Service, that allows Jack to tag along during the investigation with the stipulation that he does not write anything about the case until it is solved. This is to prevent the "Poet" so the FBI calls him does not escape. In return, Jack gets all the information first in order for him to write the story when it is all said and done.
The novel is well written and worth the time to read. It has one spiral after another. Friends and coworkers turn on each other, as when someone leaks out the story that Jack is doing, even though Jack and the FBI have an agreement. The story is also written with climax after climax, once the FBI and Jack get their man, or do they? The story keeps the reader guessing untill the very end. As for the romantics out there, there is a love story that takes off between Special Agent Rachel and Jack that has a guessing ending.
Reviewer: Jeff Dunbar
Date: May 2, 2004
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful and suspenseful, Aug. 4 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: The Poet (Mass Market Paperback)
THE POET centers around the apparent suicide of a cop, Sean, who has left behind a note that is written on his windshield, it is a line from an Edgar Allen Poe poem, and nobody can quite figure it out. As the plot unfolds he uncovers more and more evidence .One wonders after a while how inept the police could be to have missed it all and what HAD been a suicide now becomes a homicide. If you liked VOID MOON, you'll love this one, though THE POET can easily stand on its own.
Also would recommend another entirely different kind of book, though it too is suspeseful: THE BARK OF THE DOGWOOD.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Connelly's vacation from Harry Bosch, Nov. 19 2008
By 
Paul Weiss (Dundas, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Poet (Mass Market Paperback)
Jack McEvoy is a reporter on the crime scene in Denver. His twin brother, homicide detective Sean McEvoy, has recently been found dead, presumably a suicide, by a shotgun blast to the head. The suicide note is a cryptic excerpt from a macabre Edgar Allan Poe poem, certainly focused on death but so enigmatic as to be almost meaningless as a final message to the world. In the course of gathering material for a feature article he wants to write on the alarmingly high frequency of stress-related police suicides, Jack discovers evidence which leads him to believe that Sean was murdered by the child-killer that he had been investigating. A skilled and resourceful investigative reporter, Jack uncovers a series of puzzling contradictions. Now believing that Sean was not the only victim of this false suicide MO, he takes his evidence to the FBI and the hunt is on for a deranged serial pedophile killer who targets children AND the police officers investigating the murders.

Maybe Michael Connelly wanted a break or perhaps he felt his fans needed a breather. In any event, "The Poet" is a slight departure from his string of runaway success Harry Bosch novels. It certainly takes place in the same gritty US crime atmosphere - FBI agent Rachel Walling is even an import from previous Bosch novels - but McEvoy as a character is a little more grounded, a little more professionally certain of himself, a little less angst ridden, a little less sure of his relationships with the fairer sex and - well, just different than Harry! In short, he's a fine addition to the Connelly pantheon of fascinating characters and I'll certainly be looking forward to a return appearance in a future novel.

I recently wrote a review of Tess Gerritsen's "The Sinner" in which I suggested that she had failed to clear the bar that she had set for herself in her previous novels. I think I can make the same comment about "The Poet". While it was a thoroughly enjoyable read, it simply didn't drag me kicking and screaming into the wee hours reading with bleary eyes the way that his previous Harry Bosch novels did. But a poor day with a Michael Connelly crime novel still beats the stuffing out of most of his competition on their best days and I'm happy to award this one four stars.

Recommended.

Paul Weiss
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4.0 out of 5 stars Meeting Evil Face-to-Face, Sept. 10 2008
By 
Donald Mitchell "Jesus Loves You!" (Thanks for Providing My Reviews over 124,000 Helpful Votes Globally) - See all my reviews
(#1 HALL OF FAME)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Poet (Mass Market Paperback)
Jack McEvoy is a crime-beat reporter in Denver whose twin brother, Sean McEvoy, was found dead of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound after obsessing over the murder and mutilation of a girl. Jack starts asking the kind of questions that only a journalist would think of, and bingo . . . he finds that there's something strange going on: There have been a lot of so-called suicides of police officers who have been investigating the murders of children and those who teach and tend them. The link seems to be that they all left notes that contain quote from Edgar Allen Poe.

Soon, Jack is on the hunt and his investigation draws the attention of the FBI when he tries to access a data base of police suicides. Can Jack find out what's going on . . . or will the FBI stonewall him?

This story doesn't start off as fast as most books about serial killers do. That's a shame. With a more powerful beginning, this story would be a classic. But be patient; the story speeds up as it goes.

One of the most appealing parts of this book is looking at the challenge of investigating crimes as a journalist rather than as a law enforcement professional. I think you'll find the contrast to be interesting.

The book also features lots of opportunities to get to know the serial killer so character development is excellent for building tension and interest.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Spectacular!, July 9 2004
By 
Bookworm Plus "Bill C." (Redondo Beach, CA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Poet (Mass Market Paperback)
Wanting to expand my mystery writer horizons, I picked up The Poet and hit the jackpot. The best word to describe it is SPECTACULAR. The quick pace of a reporter investigating serial murders of children and then the investigating detectives kept the excitement level high throughout the entire book. The effect is enhanced by the superior job at character development by Connelly when compared to most mystery/thriller writers. Several characters such as McEvoy, Wallings, Thorsen, and Gladding will stay in my head for a long time. The Poet deals with a despicable part of the human endeavor in a way that is very tasteful and non-gratuitous. Many books in this genre start out great, but then fizzle at the end. I believe this is because endings tend to be one-track and an effort by the author to simply finish the book. In contrast, The Poet twisted and turned at the end as it went through several plausible endings that turned out to be way stations before the final shocking crescendo. I was delighted to find out that Connolly's latest book, The Narrows, is a sequel. I am sure all of you out there know what author I picked for my next purchase!
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Thriller, June 24 2004
This review is from: The Poet (Mass Market Paperback)
Kudos for Michael Connelly! The Poet is one of his best works yet, and this from a Harry Bosch fan. If it doesn't have Harry in it, it usually doesn't have the same spark. However, The Poet definitely had a spark!
The book is about what appears to be a serial killer, murdering innocent citizens and then moving on to the homicide cop investigating the case. Throughout the whole book you don't know if it's one killer or two, why they're doing it or where they'll strike next. With the twin brother of one of the murdered cops investigating and the FBI's help, the search is on.
This story is a thriller. I find some of the reviews saying that the ending was predictable or that the killer/s were, but I find that hard to believe. I've been reading mysteries and thrillers for about 20 years, and this one came as a shock to me! That doesn't happen much. Anyway, I found the characters very likable and the story exciting, hard to put down. I'd recommend this book to anyone. It's now one of my favorite Connelly's and I can't wait to start on The Narrows!
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3.0 out of 5 stars Poe Lives On Evermore, June 7 2004
By 
This review is from: The Poet (Mass Market Paperback)
Police officers are committing suicide all over the country. Cops who could never quite solve the murder cases they were on. Strange quotes left by each of the men, lines taken from the famous poems of Edgar Allan Poe. Sound thrilling? Read on.
Edgar Allan Poe was the master of mystery and the macabre. Now there could be a killer on the loose using call signs taken from the poet who has been dead for over a hundred years. Michael Connelly is looking to place himself up in the ranks as the master of mystery and the macabre. He has done so with The Poet and will keep you searching around for the next clue in a new twist.
Connelly tells the story from the first person point of view of Jack McEvoy, a reporter from Denver whose twin brother is the latest of the mysterious detective suicides. With the dynamic writing style, the reader is with McEvoy every step as he surrounds himself with some colorful characters of the FBI to help solve the puzzle of his brother's death.
The Poet moves with the grace of a poem and keeps the excitement of a good mystery as you find yourself turning the pages looking for the next clue. At times it seems to slow down but then picks up with a surprising twist or two. Michael Connelly has accomplished one hell of a thriller and this is one you won't want to miss.
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