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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Josephine Tey - A great "discovery"
Never having heard of Josephine Tey, I purchased this book and another, "Brat Farrar" on the strength of the description.
I have since read several other of the Tey collection, and I find them wonderful. Not a "mystery" in the usual sense, this is a novel which contains a so-called mystery. In other of her works, her Inspector Grant follows more...
Published on April 19 2002

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Painfully dull.
I'm a Ricardian. I don't think Richard did his nephews in. Neither do I think that this book is a classic. It has a rather simple premise, and Tey seems completely set upon raising Richard III to a sort of divine pedestal. The guy had flaws. He was responsible for beheading people, and was a king. He is one of my favorite characters in history, and Tey tries, she...
Published on Aug. 2 2000 by Malice


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Josephine Tey - A great "discovery", April 19 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: The Daughter of Time (Paperback)
Never having heard of Josephine Tey, I purchased this book and another, "Brat Farrar" on the strength of the description.
I have since read several other of the Tey collection, and I find them wonderful. Not a "mystery" in the usual sense, this is a novel which contains a so-called mystery. In other of her works, her Inspector Grant follows more conventional lines of investigating crimes. If you like one of Tey's books, I think
you will like them all. I highly recommend them.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating historical information in charming novel., June 10 2013
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This review is from: The Daughter of Time (Paperback)
Tey's fame as a mystery writer attracted me to this book. The historical information is fascinating, and its presentation in the form of a modern-day take on an old slander is charming. Writing is period from mid-20th century. Nice introduction to the Tudor family and their ruthlessness....it starts here, with Richard III being their scapegoat!
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4.0 out of 5 stars "Truth is the daughter of time" -- glad to see her back!, Dec 2 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: The Daughter of Time (Paperback)
I'm happy to see this book printed once again, and happier still to see so many comments posted on it. My own pleasure in the book was that like only a handful of others -- including In the Beginning by Chaim Potok & Contact by Carl Sagan -- this book manages to dramatize the love of truth and the thrill of the quest for knowledge. It doesn't work for everyone. Some people need more physical chase scenes. But Tey imparts the thrill of the chase to historical research, and has succeeded in getting a number of readers interested in exloring more. That's an accomplishment. If you do want to find out more about the subject, the Richard III Society (mentioned in the book) has a website, including an extensive online library. One thing I keep hoping for in books like this is that they will teach readers about evaluating information and filtering propaganda from fact. Whatever you decide about the guilt or innocence of Richard III, examining what happened to history in the hands of More and Shakespeare and all who read them uncritically points out that now and always -- don't just question authority, question *everything*. Francis Bacon said "Truth is the daughter of time -- not of authority." (The source of the title.) But time itself doesn't uncover the truth -- human minds do. The Daughter of Time is a "research procedural", demonstrating the methods of checking source documents and evaluating written records much like a police procedural demonstrates search patterns and physical evidence collection. The detective novel has always had a core theme of celebrating human reason and advocating that "the truth will set you free." I hope the high popularity of the detective novel these days means that theme is catching on.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of history's true mysteries examined, March 25 2002
By 
J. Carroll "Jack" (Island Heights,NJ) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Daughter of Time (Paperback)
What happened to Richard III's nephews? Josephine Tey takes a look at the tales of Richard, his nephews, and what happened at the Tower of London. Starting with the Richard of Shakespeare and Thomas More, Tey, (through her bed-ridden detective Grant) dissects the stories of Richard III and finds a few problems with the Richard III most people are familiar with. Whether this revisionist view of Richard stands up to scrutiny is up to those with more background in this area than me, but I thoroughly enjoyed Tey's portrayal of the search for truth in the face of legend.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a book to read and re-read (especially history lovers, Aug. 22 2002
By 
Kathylene Privitera (Augusta, WV United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Daughter of Time (Library Binding)
I first read this book 25 years ago and after re-reading it recently, I realize that the view of history as put forth by "Daughter of Time", is the view I have carried with me for the last 25 years. After reading the above reviews, I wanted to put my 2 cents in and say that this is the BEST of the Tey books. It is a mystery for history lovers and leaves an impression that other "light reading" does not. Josephine Tey is unfortunately gone from us, but this book remains a True Classic.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars THERE IS MORE TO THIS THAN MEETS THE EYE..., Dec 8 2003
By 
Lawyeraau (Balmoral Castle) - See all my reviews
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Daughter of Time (Audio CD)
This is a wonderful genre bending book...part mystery, part history. Written by Scotswoman Elizabeth MacIntosh, who wrote under the pen name Josephine Tey, it was first published in 1951. It is tragic that the author died in 1952 and was never to know the pleasure that this book would bring to generations of readers and that the Mystery Writers of America would ultimately rank it fourth among the one hundred best mysteries ever written.
The title of the book is derived from a historical source, as it is attributable to Sir Francis Bacon, "For truth is rightly named after the daughter of time, and not of authority." The book itself is not a traditional mystery but rather an application of deductive reasoning to an actual historical event. The event in question is the murder of the princes in the tower, sons of King Edward IV, allegedly by their uncle, Richard III, who eventually usurped the English throne after the death of his brother. It has been widely held that Richard III did, indeed, murder the two young princes, his nephews, in order to secure his claim to the throne.
The reader is introduced to Scotland Yard Inspector Alan Grant, who is hospitalized and recovering from injuries sustained in the line of duty. While convalescing, he becomes intrigued by a picture of a portrait of Richard III, a likeness with which he is unfamiliar. Grant is puzzled that someone with such a sensitive face could have been such a monster as to murder his two nephews in cold blood. So, our intrepid Inspector decides that he will reconsider the evidence upon which such a dastardly assumption has been based. With the help of an American researcher doing the necessary legwork, Grant compiles enough archival historical fact that incrementally helps him formulate a new theory as to who actually may have murdered the princes in the tower.
This analysis and reformulation is done as though it were being argued to a jury. Indeed, so persuasive is Inspector Grant through the application of some insightful deductive reasoning and clever dialogue that the reader comes away thinking that Grant has solved one of the most intriguing historical mysteries of all time. This is certainly an unusual book conceptually but one that succeeds brilliantly. It should appeal to those readers who enjoy having a mystery unraveled, as well as to those who harbor a love of English history. Bravo!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Painfully dull., Aug. 2 2000
This review is from: The Daughter of Time (Paperback)
I'm a Ricardian. I don't think Richard did his nephews in. Neither do I think that this book is a classic. It has a rather simple premise, and Tey seems completely set upon raising Richard III to a sort of divine pedestal. The guy had flaws. He was responsible for beheading people, and was a king. He is one of my favorite characters in history, and Tey tries, she does...but it falls flat. Carradine got on my nerves as well. Sorry.
If you want an admittedly romanticized (but far more interesting) book about Richard III, I would wholeheartedly suggest "The Sunne in Splendour". It is a finely crafted novel in which Sharon Kay Penman goes to show you that it is indeed very possible that Richard III was not the brute Will Shakespeare makes him out to be. Penman stays well within the historical boundaries (her reasearch is almost without boundaries).
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Expand your knowledge of history, July 23 2002
By 
Eduardo Bilbatua (Mexico) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Daughter of Time (Paperback)
A very interesting idea about using a modern investigative approach to a 500 year old case. I learned a lot about the
Richard III era. I would like to know if the facts presented
are verifiable because the evidence and analysis presented seem solid.
I read about this book and author in a text by Christopher Hitchens, he seems to be a fan.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Ricardian Argument, With Delightful Training Wheels, Feb. 10 2002
By 
Paul Frandano (Reston, Va. USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Daughter of Time (Paperback)
What thoughtful reader hasn't experienced Shakespeare's Richard III and wondered about the accuracy of the Bard's portrayal? Thus did Josephine Tey, near the close of her authorial career, delve into some of the lost nooks and crannies of English history in an effort to recover "the real Richard."
The well-known hurdle for all would-be Ricardians is, of course, the utter absence of source material contemporary to Richard's reign, and most of all anything that discusses the fate of the "princes in the Tower." All that is generally counted as "authoritative," it turns out, is the product of Tudor dynasty information factories. Tey, however, very likely had in her possession the writings of Sir Clements Markham, a late Victorian-era civil servant, whose careful revisionist argument is here unfolded in a lively, compelling narrative of incremental discovery.
Prompted by a reproduction of a famous portrait of Richard, Tey's laid-up sleuth, with the help of an American researcher, marshalls from his bed an archival assault on the estimable Sir Thomas More, Henry (the VII) Tudor, and the entire phalanx of worthies who have reported, for the last half a millennium, that Richard was the demonic crookback murderer of Shakespeare's characterization. Happily for us, there's more (sic) to the story than the traditional record, and those not already sucked into the revisionist Ricardian argument may very well be converted. Tey's engaging "fiction" is not only a great boon to all Ricardians--who, with Richard III Societies on both sides of the pond, must surely win hundreds if not thousands of new converts yearly as a result of this 50-year-old work--but the perfect place to begin your own exploration of this great historical proto-conspiracy.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Paradoxical, Sept. 16 1999
By 
This review is from: The Daughter of Time (Paperback)
A pleasant little historical screed, Daughter of Time seems to be in love with revisionism for its own sake. To the detriment of its thesis, it presents all arguments against Richard III's villainy as good arguments, and all arguments for his villainy as bad arguments. While the factual arguments set out in the book, such as the unreliability of More's account of Richard III's reign and the lateness of the accusations against Richard, are persuasive, Tey also places great reliance upon her (and her characters, Grant and Carradine's) ability to judge a man's character and motives from his face and his actions after 400 years. This kind of "a person like X would never have done Y" argument counts for beans with me -- people are way too complex for such simple and subjective judgments.
When it is not writing in full-out polemic mode, Tey's dialogue is urbane and fun to read. If she had only had the sense to separate the good arguments for her thesis from the bad ones, she would have been convincing as well as entertaining.
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